Limits...
Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 55-year-old man was referred due to marginal recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma at the site of a previous radiofrequency ablation. Arterial phase (A) and portal venous phase (B) axial CT scans show a marginally enhancing lesion (arrowheads in A) with wash-out (arrowheads in B) at the periphery of the previously ablated site (arrow) in the lateral segment of the left lobe of the liver. Initially, repeat radiofrequency ablation was considered for this recurrent mass. However, the coronal MPR image (C) revealed close proximity between the suspected viable tumor (arrowheads) and the inferior pericardium (thin black arrow). To avoid thermal damage to the pericardium and to guarantee a safe and clear margin from the viable tumor, the patient underwent surgery. The lesion was separated from the pericardium and pathologically proven to be a recurrent cholangiocarcinoma. This case demonstrates the role of MPR images as a guidance to determine which procedure is appropriate. MPR : multiplanar reconstruction
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747398&req=5

Figure 0014: A 55-year-old man was referred due to marginal recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma at the site of a previous radiofrequency ablation. Arterial phase (A) and portal venous phase (B) axial CT scans show a marginally enhancing lesion (arrowheads in A) with wash-out (arrowheads in B) at the periphery of the previously ablated site (arrow) in the lateral segment of the left lobe of the liver. Initially, repeat radiofrequency ablation was considered for this recurrent mass. However, the coronal MPR image (C) revealed close proximity between the suspected viable tumor (arrowheads) and the inferior pericardium (thin black arrow). To avoid thermal damage to the pericardium and to guarantee a safe and clear margin from the viable tumor, the patient underwent surgery. The lesion was separated from the pericardium and pathologically proven to be a recurrent cholangiocarcinoma. This case demonstrates the role of MPR images as a guidance to determine which procedure is appropriate. MPR : multiplanar reconstruction

Mentions: The incidence of biliary complications has ranged from 11 to 25%. They are a major cause of morbidity following orthotopic liver transplantation and affect graft survival, the duration of hospital stay, recovery, and overall cost of care. The most common complications are biliary leaks, strictures, and stones.[25] Portal vein stenosis or thrombosis occuring during the early posttransplantation period can be devastating, resulting in loss of the graft.[26] Therefore, knowledge of these complications and early detection are important. The development of therapeutic endoscopic and percutaneous radiologic methods has made it possible to manage these complications in a less invasive manner. MPR images can be helpful in determining these therapeutic approaches [Figures 11–14].


Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

A 55-year-old man was referred due to marginal recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma at the site of a previous radiofrequency ablation. Arterial phase (A) and portal venous phase (B) axial CT scans show a marginally enhancing lesion (arrowheads in A) with wash-out (arrowheads in B) at the periphery of the previously ablated site (arrow) in the lateral segment of the left lobe of the liver. Initially, repeat radiofrequency ablation was considered for this recurrent mass. However, the coronal MPR image (C) revealed close proximity between the suspected viable tumor (arrowheads) and the inferior pericardium (thin black arrow). To avoid thermal damage to the pericardium and to guarantee a safe and clear margin from the viable tumor, the patient underwent surgery. The lesion was separated from the pericardium and pathologically proven to be a recurrent cholangiocarcinoma. This case demonstrates the role of MPR images as a guidance to determine which procedure is appropriate. MPR : multiplanar reconstruction
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747398&req=5

Figure 0014: A 55-year-old man was referred due to marginal recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma at the site of a previous radiofrequency ablation. Arterial phase (A) and portal venous phase (B) axial CT scans show a marginally enhancing lesion (arrowheads in A) with wash-out (arrowheads in B) at the periphery of the previously ablated site (arrow) in the lateral segment of the left lobe of the liver. Initially, repeat radiofrequency ablation was considered for this recurrent mass. However, the coronal MPR image (C) revealed close proximity between the suspected viable tumor (arrowheads) and the inferior pericardium (thin black arrow). To avoid thermal damage to the pericardium and to guarantee a safe and clear margin from the viable tumor, the patient underwent surgery. The lesion was separated from the pericardium and pathologically proven to be a recurrent cholangiocarcinoma. This case demonstrates the role of MPR images as a guidance to determine which procedure is appropriate. MPR : multiplanar reconstruction
Mentions: The incidence of biliary complications has ranged from 11 to 25%. They are a major cause of morbidity following orthotopic liver transplantation and affect graft survival, the duration of hospital stay, recovery, and overall cost of care. The most common complications are biliary leaks, strictures, and stones.[25] Portal vein stenosis or thrombosis occuring during the early posttransplantation period can be devastating, resulting in loss of the graft.[26] Therefore, knowledge of these complications and early detection are important. The development of therapeutic endoscopic and percutaneous radiologic methods has made it possible to manage these complications in a less invasive manner. MPR images can be helpful in determining these therapeutic approaches [Figures 11–14].

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus