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Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 52-year-old man who had undergone a liver transplantation presented with fever. Coronal MPR CT scan (A) shows dilated IHDs and a loculated fluid collection near the CHD (arrow). Bile leak at the anastomotic site of the CHD and communication between the biloma and CHD was suspected. ERCP (B) in the same plane, reveals bile leak at the anastomotic site (arrow). Endoscopic CBD stent insertions (C, D) were performed. MPR: multiplanar reconstruction, CHD: common hepatic duct, IHD; intrahepatic duct
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Figure 0011: A 52-year-old man who had undergone a liver transplantation presented with fever. Coronal MPR CT scan (A) shows dilated IHDs and a loculated fluid collection near the CHD (arrow). Bile leak at the anastomotic site of the CHD and communication between the biloma and CHD was suspected. ERCP (B) in the same plane, reveals bile leak at the anastomotic site (arrow). Endoscopic CBD stent insertions (C, D) were performed. MPR: multiplanar reconstruction, CHD: common hepatic duct, IHD; intrahepatic duct

Mentions: The incidence of biliary complications has ranged from 11 to 25%. They are a major cause of morbidity following orthotopic liver transplantation and affect graft survival, the duration of hospital stay, recovery, and overall cost of care. The most common complications are biliary leaks, strictures, and stones.[25] Portal vein stenosis or thrombosis occuring during the early posttransplantation period can be devastating, resulting in loss of the graft.[26] Therefore, knowledge of these complications and early detection are important. The development of therapeutic endoscopic and percutaneous radiologic methods has made it possible to manage these complications in a less invasive manner. MPR images can be helpful in determining these therapeutic approaches [Figures 11–14].


Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

A 52-year-old man who had undergone a liver transplantation presented with fever. Coronal MPR CT scan (A) shows dilated IHDs and a loculated fluid collection near the CHD (arrow). Bile leak at the anastomotic site of the CHD and communication between the biloma and CHD was suspected. ERCP (B) in the same plane, reveals bile leak at the anastomotic site (arrow). Endoscopic CBD stent insertions (C, D) were performed. MPR: multiplanar reconstruction, CHD: common hepatic duct, IHD; intrahepatic duct
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747398&req=5

Figure 0011: A 52-year-old man who had undergone a liver transplantation presented with fever. Coronal MPR CT scan (A) shows dilated IHDs and a loculated fluid collection near the CHD (arrow). Bile leak at the anastomotic site of the CHD and communication between the biloma and CHD was suspected. ERCP (B) in the same plane, reveals bile leak at the anastomotic site (arrow). Endoscopic CBD stent insertions (C, D) were performed. MPR: multiplanar reconstruction, CHD: common hepatic duct, IHD; intrahepatic duct
Mentions: The incidence of biliary complications has ranged from 11 to 25%. They are a major cause of morbidity following orthotopic liver transplantation and affect graft survival, the duration of hospital stay, recovery, and overall cost of care. The most common complications are biliary leaks, strictures, and stones.[25] Portal vein stenosis or thrombosis occuring during the early posttransplantation period can be devastating, resulting in loss of the graft.[26] Therefore, knowledge of these complications and early detection are important. The development of therapeutic endoscopic and percutaneous radiologic methods has made it possible to manage these complications in a less invasive manner. MPR images can be helpful in determining these therapeutic approaches [Figures 11–14].

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus