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Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 70-year-old man with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer. MinIP (A) and inversion mode (B) images show that the intrahepatic ducts (IHD) and CBD are severely dilated due to a distal CBD lesion (arrow in B). The inversion mode tool transforms anechoic voxels into solid areas. MinIP : minimum intensity projection, RIHD = right intrahepatic duct, LIHD = left intrahepatic duct
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Figure 0003: A 70-year-old man with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer. MinIP (A) and inversion mode (B) images show that the intrahepatic ducts (IHD) and CBD are severely dilated due to a distal CBD lesion (arrow in B). The inversion mode tool transforms anechoic voxels into solid areas. MinIP : minimum intensity projection, RIHD = right intrahepatic duct, LIHD = left intrahepatic duct

Mentions: Inversion mode is a new post-processing tool that uses a rendering algorithm for the 3D analysis of fluid-filled structures[6] and transforms echolucent structures into solid voxels. Thus, anechoic structures, such as the lumen of the great vessels, bile duct, and gallbladder, appear echogenic on the rendered image, whereas structures that are normally echogenic prior to gray-scale inversion (e.g. bones) become anechoic. Examples are shown in Figure 3.


Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

A 70-year-old man with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer. MinIP (A) and inversion mode (B) images show that the intrahepatic ducts (IHD) and CBD are severely dilated due to a distal CBD lesion (arrow in B). The inversion mode tool transforms anechoic voxels into solid areas. MinIP : minimum intensity projection, RIHD = right intrahepatic duct, LIHD = left intrahepatic duct
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747398&req=5

Figure 0003: A 70-year-old man with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer. MinIP (A) and inversion mode (B) images show that the intrahepatic ducts (IHD) and CBD are severely dilated due to a distal CBD lesion (arrow in B). The inversion mode tool transforms anechoic voxels into solid areas. MinIP : minimum intensity projection, RIHD = right intrahepatic duct, LIHD = left intrahepatic duct
Mentions: Inversion mode is a new post-processing tool that uses a rendering algorithm for the 3D analysis of fluid-filled structures[6] and transforms echolucent structures into solid voxels. Thus, anechoic structures, such as the lumen of the great vessels, bile duct, and gallbladder, appear echogenic on the rendered image, whereas structures that are normally echogenic prior to gray-scale inversion (e.g. bones) become anechoic. Examples are shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus