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Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

3-D surface-rendering image of a gallbladder polyp (arrow) in a 30-year-old man. On pathologic examination after cholecystectomy, this lesion was confirmed to be an adenomatous polyp
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Figure 0001: 3-D surface-rendering image of a gallbladder polyp (arrow) in a 30-year-old man. On pathologic examination after cholecystectomy, this lesion was confirmed to be an adenomatous polyp

Mentions: 1. Surface-based rendering: The most commonly used 3D display technique is based on the visualization of surfaces of structures or organs. This technique can be performed manually, with the operator determining the boundaries of the structures, or by automated techniques.[3] After the tissues or structures have been classified, a surface-rendering algorithm shades and illuminates the surface representation, at times adding depth cues, so that topography and 3D geometry can be more easily comprehended. An example of 3D surface rendering is shown in Figure 1, which demonstrates a small polyp in a distended gallbladder. The operators may view the anatomy from different perspectives using either automatic rotation or user-controlled motion.


Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

3-D surface-rendering image of a gallbladder polyp (arrow) in a 30-year-old man. On pathologic examination after cholecystectomy, this lesion was confirmed to be an adenomatous polyp
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747398&req=5

Figure 0001: 3-D surface-rendering image of a gallbladder polyp (arrow) in a 30-year-old man. On pathologic examination after cholecystectomy, this lesion was confirmed to be an adenomatous polyp
Mentions: 1. Surface-based rendering: The most commonly used 3D display technique is based on the visualization of surfaces of structures or organs. This technique can be performed manually, with the operator determining the boundaries of the structures, or by automated techniques.[3] After the tissues or structures have been classified, a surface-rendering algorithm shades and illuminates the surface representation, at times adding depth cues, so that topography and 3D geometry can be more easily comprehended. An example of 3D surface rendering is shown in Figure 1, which demonstrates a small polyp in a distended gallbladder. The operators may view the anatomy from different perspectives using either automatic rotation or user-controlled motion.

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus