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HbA1c is associated with severity of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in nondiabetic men.

Papanas N, Steiropoulos P, Nena E, Tzouvelekis A, Maltezos E, Trakada G, Bouros D - Vasc Health Risk Manag (2009)

Bottom Line: Finally, glucose and HbA(1c) levels showed a significant negative correlation with average SpO(2) (P = 0.013 and P = 0.012, respectively) and, additionally, glucose levels with minimum SpO(2) (P = 0.027) during sleep.In conclusion, severity of OSAS among nondiabetic men is associated with increased HbA(1c) levels and increased fasting glucose.However, further work is needed to confirm the clinical significance of these observations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Outpatient Clinic of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism at the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece. papanasnikos@yahoo.gr

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine the potential correlation of sleep characteristics with glucose metabolism in nondiabetic men with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Included were 31 male patients (mean age 46.7 +/- 11 years), recently diagnosed with OSAS by full polysomnography. There was a significant correlation of fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels with arousal index (P = 0.047 and P = 0.014, respectively). Moreover, HbA(1c) levels were correlated with apnea hypopnea index (P = 0.009), a widely accepted marker of the severity of OSAS, and with percentage of sleep time with saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO(2)) < 90% (t < 90%) ( P = 0.010). Finally, glucose and HbA(1c) levels showed a significant negative correlation with average SpO(2) (P = 0.013 and P = 0.012, respectively) and, additionally, glucose levels with minimum SpO(2) (P = 0.027) during sleep. In conclusion, severity of OSAS among nondiabetic men is associated with increased HbA(1c) levels and increased fasting glucose. Thus, severity of OSAS may be an additional marker of cardiovascular risk, as well as of future diabetes, in these subjects. However, further work is needed to confirm the clinical significance of these observations.

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Correlations of HbA1c levels with AHI (A), AI (B), average SpO2 (C) and percentage of sleep time with SpO2< 90% (D).Abbreviations: AHI, Apnea Hypopnea Index; AI, Arousal Index; HbA1c, glycosylated hemoglobin; SpO2, saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry.
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f1-vhrm-5-751: Correlations of HbA1c levels with AHI (A), AI (B), average SpO2 (C) and percentage of sleep time with SpO2< 90% (D).Abbreviations: AHI, Apnea Hypopnea Index; AI, Arousal Index; HbA1c, glycosylated hemoglobin; SpO2, saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry.

Mentions: A significant correlation between HbA1c levels and apnea-related parameters (AHI, average saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry [SpO2], percentage of sleep time with SpO2 < 90%, ie, t < 90, and AI) was revealed (Figure 1). Moreover, fasting glucose levels were significantly correlated with AI and average and minimum SpO2 (Figure 2). As shown in Table 2, correlations were independent of BMI.


HbA1c is associated with severity of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in nondiabetic men.

Papanas N, Steiropoulos P, Nena E, Tzouvelekis A, Maltezos E, Trakada G, Bouros D - Vasc Health Risk Manag (2009)

Correlations of HbA1c levels with AHI (A), AI (B), average SpO2 (C) and percentage of sleep time with SpO2< 90% (D).Abbreviations: AHI, Apnea Hypopnea Index; AI, Arousal Index; HbA1c, glycosylated hemoglobin; SpO2, saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747393&req=5

f1-vhrm-5-751: Correlations of HbA1c levels with AHI (A), AI (B), average SpO2 (C) and percentage of sleep time with SpO2< 90% (D).Abbreviations: AHI, Apnea Hypopnea Index; AI, Arousal Index; HbA1c, glycosylated hemoglobin; SpO2, saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry.
Mentions: A significant correlation between HbA1c levels and apnea-related parameters (AHI, average saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry [SpO2], percentage of sleep time with SpO2 < 90%, ie, t < 90, and AI) was revealed (Figure 1). Moreover, fasting glucose levels were significantly correlated with AI and average and minimum SpO2 (Figure 2). As shown in Table 2, correlations were independent of BMI.

Bottom Line: Finally, glucose and HbA(1c) levels showed a significant negative correlation with average SpO(2) (P = 0.013 and P = 0.012, respectively) and, additionally, glucose levels with minimum SpO(2) (P = 0.027) during sleep.In conclusion, severity of OSAS among nondiabetic men is associated with increased HbA(1c) levels and increased fasting glucose.However, further work is needed to confirm the clinical significance of these observations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Outpatient Clinic of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism at the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece. papanasnikos@yahoo.gr

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine the potential correlation of sleep characteristics with glucose metabolism in nondiabetic men with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Included were 31 male patients (mean age 46.7 +/- 11 years), recently diagnosed with OSAS by full polysomnography. There was a significant correlation of fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels with arousal index (P = 0.047 and P = 0.014, respectively). Moreover, HbA(1c) levels were correlated with apnea hypopnea index (P = 0.009), a widely accepted marker of the severity of OSAS, and with percentage of sleep time with saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO(2)) < 90% (t < 90%) ( P = 0.010). Finally, glucose and HbA(1c) levels showed a significant negative correlation with average SpO(2) (P = 0.013 and P = 0.012, respectively) and, additionally, glucose levels with minimum SpO(2) (P = 0.027) during sleep. In conclusion, severity of OSAS among nondiabetic men is associated with increased HbA(1c) levels and increased fasting glucose. Thus, severity of OSAS may be an additional marker of cardiovascular risk, as well as of future diabetes, in these subjects. However, further work is needed to confirm the clinical significance of these observations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus