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Age-related differences in muscular capacity among workers.

Hamberg-van Reenen HH, van der Beek AJ, Blatter BM, van Mechelen W, Bongers PM - Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2009)

Bottom Line: Cross-sectionally, static endurance of the neck/shoulder muscles was highest among older workers, but decreased longitudinally among all age groups.Younger workers who participated in sports frequently had the best muscular capacity.For aging workers, moderate sports participation seems to be effective in keeping them suitable for the relatively growing work demands.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, Work and Health, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To quantify the age-related changes in muscular capacity in a working population, and to investigate whether these changes are dependent on sports participation.

Methods: Data were used from the longitudinal study on musculoskeletal disorders, absenteeism, stress and health (n = 1,800). At baseline, isokinetic lifting strength and static muscle endurance were assessed, and endurance measurements were repeated after 3 years of follow-up. Sports participation was assessed using a questionnaire.

Results: Cross-sectionally, static endurance of the neck/shoulder muscles was highest among older workers, but decreased longitudinally among all age groups. Younger workers who participated in sports 3 h per week or more had the best performance, but older workers who participated between 0 and 3 h per week had better performance than those who participated in sports more frequently.

Conclusions: There were age-related differences on muscular capacity. Younger workers who participated in sports frequently had the best muscular capacity. For aging workers, moderate sports participation seems to be effective in keeping them suitable for the relatively growing work demands.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cross-sectional regression functions of baseline static muscle endurance time of the back muscles (a), the neck muscles (b) and the shoulder muscles (c) by age. Stratified for sports participation: never (continuous lines), >0 and <3 h per week (large dotted lined), and ≥3 h per week (small dotted lines)
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Fig3: Cross-sectional regression functions of baseline static muscle endurance time of the back muscles (a), the neck muscles (b) and the shoulder muscles (c) by age. Stratified for sports participation: never (continuous lines), >0 and <3 h per week (large dotted lined), and ≥3 h per week (small dotted lines)

Mentions: Figure 3 shows baseline static muscle endurance time by age stratified for sports participation. It can be seen that there were only small differences between the sports participation groups. Younger workers who participated in sports for at least 3 h per week had the longest endurance time. There are only small differences between workers who participate in sports for fewer hours per week or not at all. For older workers, either frequently sporting workers (for the back muscles) or moderate frequently sporting workers (for the shoulder muscles) had the longest endurance time or the endurance time is equal for sporting or not sporting workers (for the neck muscles). Ten percent or less of the variation in static endurance time can be explained by age (R2 between 0.001 and 0.10).Fig. 3


Age-related differences in muscular capacity among workers.

Hamberg-van Reenen HH, van der Beek AJ, Blatter BM, van Mechelen W, Bongers PM - Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2009)

Cross-sectional regression functions of baseline static muscle endurance time of the back muscles (a), the neck muscles (b) and the shoulder muscles (c) by age. Stratified for sports participation: never (continuous lines), >0 and <3 h per week (large dotted lined), and ≥3 h per week (small dotted lines)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2746892&req=5

Fig3: Cross-sectional regression functions of baseline static muscle endurance time of the back muscles (a), the neck muscles (b) and the shoulder muscles (c) by age. Stratified for sports participation: never (continuous lines), >0 and <3 h per week (large dotted lined), and ≥3 h per week (small dotted lines)
Mentions: Figure 3 shows baseline static muscle endurance time by age stratified for sports participation. It can be seen that there were only small differences between the sports participation groups. Younger workers who participated in sports for at least 3 h per week had the longest endurance time. There are only small differences between workers who participate in sports for fewer hours per week or not at all. For older workers, either frequently sporting workers (for the back muscles) or moderate frequently sporting workers (for the shoulder muscles) had the longest endurance time or the endurance time is equal for sporting or not sporting workers (for the neck muscles). Ten percent or less of the variation in static endurance time can be explained by age (R2 between 0.001 and 0.10).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Cross-sectionally, static endurance of the neck/shoulder muscles was highest among older workers, but decreased longitudinally among all age groups.Younger workers who participated in sports frequently had the best muscular capacity.For aging workers, moderate sports participation seems to be effective in keeping them suitable for the relatively growing work demands.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, Work and Health, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To quantify the age-related changes in muscular capacity in a working population, and to investigate whether these changes are dependent on sports participation.

Methods: Data were used from the longitudinal study on musculoskeletal disorders, absenteeism, stress and health (n = 1,800). At baseline, isokinetic lifting strength and static muscle endurance were assessed, and endurance measurements were repeated after 3 years of follow-up. Sports participation was assessed using a questionnaire.

Results: Cross-sectionally, static endurance of the neck/shoulder muscles was highest among older workers, but decreased longitudinally among all age groups. Younger workers who participated in sports 3 h per week or more had the best performance, but older workers who participated between 0 and 3 h per week had better performance than those who participated in sports more frequently.

Conclusions: There were age-related differences on muscular capacity. Younger workers who participated in sports frequently had the best muscular capacity. For aging workers, moderate sports participation seems to be effective in keeping them suitable for the relatively growing work demands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus