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Building research capacity for evidence-informed tobacco control in Canada: a case description.

McDonald PW, Viehbeck S, Robinson SJ, Leatherdale ST, Nykiforuk CI, Jolin MA - Tob Induc Dis (2009)

Bottom Line: This paper outlines a Canadian project to build research capacity, defined as a community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner.An organizing framework, a set of activities to build strategic recruitment, productivity tools, and procedures for enhancing social capital are described.Actions are intended to facilitate better alignment between research and the priorities of policy developers and service providers, enhance the external validity of the work performed, and reduce the time required to inform policy and practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. pwmcdona@uwaterloo.ca.

ABSTRACT
Tobacco use remains the leading cause of death and disability in Canada. Insufficient research capacity can inhibit evidence-informed decision making for tobacco control. This paper outlines a Canadian project to build research capacity, defined as a community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner. A key component is that individuals and teams within the community must mutually engage around common, collectively negotiated goals to address specific practices, policies or programs of research. An organizing framework, a set of activities to build strategic recruitment, productivity tools, and procedures for enhancing social capital are described. Actions are intended to facilitate better alignment between research and the priorities of policy developers and service providers, enhance the external validity of the work performed, and reduce the time required to inform policy and practice.

No MeSH data available.


A representation of nested teams in tobacco control research.
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Figure 1: A representation of nested teams in tobacco control research.

Mentions: The ICE-PRN began by defining research capacity as a research community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner. In this paper, the "research community" refers to individuals affiliated with the ICE-PRN (through events or network activities), while the "tobacco control community" reflects the broader national (and international) community (cf Figure 1). Our project went beyond simply wanting to increase the number of researchers who direct their attention toward a problem and the number of publications they have. Rather, within our framework, capacity has also been regarded as a function of who actively participates in the community (diversity), how they work together (social capital), what tools they have (resources), what they work on (priority setting), and how effectively products are evaluated and shared with each other and those external to the research community (research and knowledge exchange). Therefore, as we will describe later, the process for enhancing research capacity has been regarded as equally important as the products of research that were put forth by the research community (including papers in peer reviewed journals, policy briefs, technical papers, presentations to practitioners and policy developers, assessment devices, monitoring tools, treatment and decision aids, etc.).


Building research capacity for evidence-informed tobacco control in Canada: a case description.

McDonald PW, Viehbeck S, Robinson SJ, Leatherdale ST, Nykiforuk CI, Jolin MA - Tob Induc Dis (2009)

A representation of nested teams in tobacco control research.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2746799&req=5

Figure 1: A representation of nested teams in tobacco control research.
Mentions: The ICE-PRN began by defining research capacity as a research community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner. In this paper, the "research community" refers to individuals affiliated with the ICE-PRN (through events or network activities), while the "tobacco control community" reflects the broader national (and international) community (cf Figure 1). Our project went beyond simply wanting to increase the number of researchers who direct their attention toward a problem and the number of publications they have. Rather, within our framework, capacity has also been regarded as a function of who actively participates in the community (diversity), how they work together (social capital), what tools they have (resources), what they work on (priority setting), and how effectively products are evaluated and shared with each other and those external to the research community (research and knowledge exchange). Therefore, as we will describe later, the process for enhancing research capacity has been regarded as equally important as the products of research that were put forth by the research community (including papers in peer reviewed journals, policy briefs, technical papers, presentations to practitioners and policy developers, assessment devices, monitoring tools, treatment and decision aids, etc.).

Bottom Line: This paper outlines a Canadian project to build research capacity, defined as a community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner.An organizing framework, a set of activities to build strategic recruitment, productivity tools, and procedures for enhancing social capital are described.Actions are intended to facilitate better alignment between research and the priorities of policy developers and service providers, enhance the external validity of the work performed, and reduce the time required to inform policy and practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. pwmcdona@uwaterloo.ca.

ABSTRACT
Tobacco use remains the leading cause of death and disability in Canada. Insufficient research capacity can inhibit evidence-informed decision making for tobacco control. This paper outlines a Canadian project to build research capacity, defined as a community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner. A key component is that individuals and teams within the community must mutually engage around common, collectively negotiated goals to address specific practices, policies or programs of research. An organizing framework, a set of activities to build strategic recruitment, productivity tools, and procedures for enhancing social capital are described. Actions are intended to facilitate better alignment between research and the priorities of policy developers and service providers, enhance the external validity of the work performed, and reduce the time required to inform policy and practice.

No MeSH data available.