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Bioactive and structural metabolites of pseudomonas and burkholderia species causal agents of cultivated mushrooms diseases.

Andolfi A, Cimmino A, Cantore PL, Iacobellis NS, Evidente A - Perspect Medicin Chem (2008)

Bottom Line: In particular, their antimicrobial activity and the alteration of biological and model membranes (red blood cell and liposomes) was established.In the case of tolaasin I interaction with membranes was also related to the tridimensional structure in solution as determined by NMR combined with molecular dynamic calculation techniques.The isolation and structure determination of bioactive metabolites produced by B. gladioli pv. agaricicola are still in progress but preliminary results indicate their peptide nature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta, dell'Ambiente e delle Produzioni Animali, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Pseudomonas tolaasii, P. reactans and Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola, are responsible of diseases on some species of cultivated mushrooms. The main bioactive metabolites produced by both Pseudomonas strains are the lipodepsipeptides (LDPs) tolaasin I and II and the so called White Line Inducing Principle (WLIP), respectively, LDPs which have been extensively studied for their role in the disease process and for their biological properties. In particular, their antimicrobial activity and the alteration of biological and model membranes (red blood cell and liposomes) was established. In the case of tolaasin I interaction with membranes was also related to the tridimensional structure in solution as determined by NMR combined with molecular dynamic calculation techniques. Recently, five news minor tolaasins, tolaasins A-E, were isolated from the culture filtrates of P. tolaasii and their chemical structure was determined by extensive use of NMR and MS spectroscopy. Furthermore, their antimicrobial activity was evaluated on target micro-organisms (fungi-including the cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus spp.-chromista, yeast and bacteria). The Gram positive bacteria resulted the most sensible and a significant structure-activity relationships was apparent. The isolation and structure determination of bioactive metabolites produced by B. gladioli pv. agaricicola are still in progress but preliminary results indicate their peptide nature. Furthermore, the exopolysaccharide (EPS) from the culture filtrates of B. gladioli pv. agaricicola, as well as the O-chain and lipid A, from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the three bacteria, were isolated and the structures determined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of toxins on vesicle size as determined by dynamic light scattering: The treatment of phosphatidylcholine vesicle with tolaasin I (open square) and WLIP (close circle) caused changes in vesicle average size (Δ diameter) which was reported vs the toxin concentration (T), normalized to the vesicle diameter in the absence of toxin. Experiments were obtained at constant lipid concentration (80 μM). The toxin/lipid ratio (T/L) was reported in the upper scale of the same panel. Inset. In this case we analyzed the variation of the scattered light intensity (Δ ILS), normalized to the intensity value in the absence of toxin. Other parameters are as above.
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f13-pmc-2008-081: Effect of toxins on vesicle size as determined by dynamic light scattering: The treatment of phosphatidylcholine vesicle with tolaasin I (open square) and WLIP (close circle) caused changes in vesicle average size (Δ diameter) which was reported vs the toxin concentration (T), normalized to the vesicle diameter in the absence of toxin. Experiments were obtained at constant lipid concentration (80 μM). The toxin/lipid ratio (T/L) was reported in the upper scale of the same panel. Inset. In this case we analyzed the variation of the scattered light intensity (Δ ILS), normalized to the intensity value in the absence of toxin. Other parameters are as above.

Mentions: From the results reported in Figure 13 it was evident that WLIP solution at concentration higher than 27 μM showed a detergent-like activity; in fact, the intensity of the scattered light lowered probably in consequence of vesicles micellization. On the contrary, both LDPs at low concentration (at a LDP to lipid molar ratio up to 0.3) caused an increase of the liposome dimensions and a decrease of the intensity of the diffused light. These effects well correlated with vesicles aggregation, that increased the measured diameters, and with precipitation of vesicle macro-aggregates which caused a decrease of signal intensity through a decrease of the concentration of scattering centres.


Bioactive and structural metabolites of pseudomonas and burkholderia species causal agents of cultivated mushrooms diseases.

Andolfi A, Cimmino A, Cantore PL, Iacobellis NS, Evidente A - Perspect Medicin Chem (2008)

Effect of toxins on vesicle size as determined by dynamic light scattering: The treatment of phosphatidylcholine vesicle with tolaasin I (open square) and WLIP (close circle) caused changes in vesicle average size (Δ diameter) which was reported vs the toxin concentration (T), normalized to the vesicle diameter in the absence of toxin. Experiments were obtained at constant lipid concentration (80 μM). The toxin/lipid ratio (T/L) was reported in the upper scale of the same panel. Inset. In this case we analyzed the variation of the scattered light intensity (Δ ILS), normalized to the intensity value in the absence of toxin. Other parameters are as above.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2746572&req=5

f13-pmc-2008-081: Effect of toxins on vesicle size as determined by dynamic light scattering: The treatment of phosphatidylcholine vesicle with tolaasin I (open square) and WLIP (close circle) caused changes in vesicle average size (Δ diameter) which was reported vs the toxin concentration (T), normalized to the vesicle diameter in the absence of toxin. Experiments were obtained at constant lipid concentration (80 μM). The toxin/lipid ratio (T/L) was reported in the upper scale of the same panel. Inset. In this case we analyzed the variation of the scattered light intensity (Δ ILS), normalized to the intensity value in the absence of toxin. Other parameters are as above.
Mentions: From the results reported in Figure 13 it was evident that WLIP solution at concentration higher than 27 μM showed a detergent-like activity; in fact, the intensity of the scattered light lowered probably in consequence of vesicles micellization. On the contrary, both LDPs at low concentration (at a LDP to lipid molar ratio up to 0.3) caused an increase of the liposome dimensions and a decrease of the intensity of the diffused light. These effects well correlated with vesicles aggregation, that increased the measured diameters, and with precipitation of vesicle macro-aggregates which caused a decrease of signal intensity through a decrease of the concentration of scattering centres.

Bottom Line: In particular, their antimicrobial activity and the alteration of biological and model membranes (red blood cell and liposomes) was established.In the case of tolaasin I interaction with membranes was also related to the tridimensional structure in solution as determined by NMR combined with molecular dynamic calculation techniques.The isolation and structure determination of bioactive metabolites produced by B. gladioli pv. agaricicola are still in progress but preliminary results indicate their peptide nature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta, dell'Ambiente e delle Produzioni Animali, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Pseudomonas tolaasii, P. reactans and Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola, are responsible of diseases on some species of cultivated mushrooms. The main bioactive metabolites produced by both Pseudomonas strains are the lipodepsipeptides (LDPs) tolaasin I and II and the so called White Line Inducing Principle (WLIP), respectively, LDPs which have been extensively studied for their role in the disease process and for their biological properties. In particular, their antimicrobial activity and the alteration of biological and model membranes (red blood cell and liposomes) was established. In the case of tolaasin I interaction with membranes was also related to the tridimensional structure in solution as determined by NMR combined with molecular dynamic calculation techniques. Recently, five news minor tolaasins, tolaasins A-E, were isolated from the culture filtrates of P. tolaasii and their chemical structure was determined by extensive use of NMR and MS spectroscopy. Furthermore, their antimicrobial activity was evaluated on target micro-organisms (fungi-including the cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus spp.-chromista, yeast and bacteria). The Gram positive bacteria resulted the most sensible and a significant structure-activity relationships was apparent. The isolation and structure determination of bioactive metabolites produced by B. gladioli pv. agaricicola are still in progress but preliminary results indicate their peptide nature. Furthermore, the exopolysaccharide (EPS) from the culture filtrates of B. gladioli pv. agaricicola, as well as the O-chain and lipid A, from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the three bacteria, were isolated and the structures determined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus