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Computer-based quality of life questionnaires may contribute to doctor-patient interactions in oncology.

Velikova G, Brown JM, Smith AB, Selby PJ - Br. J. Cancer (2002)

Bottom Line: The intervention consisted of completion of quality of life questionnaires before the consultations and informing clinicians of the results.When clinicians had the quality of life results they enquired more often about daily activities (Z= -2.71, P=0.007), emotional problems (Z= -2.11, P=0.035) and work related issues (Z= -1.89, P=0.058).Having symptoms and functional problems expressed quantitatively on a scale was useful for detection of change over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Imperial Cancer Research Fund Cancer Medicine Research Unit, St James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. csjgv@leeds.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
It is well recognized that oncologists should consider patients' quality of life and functioning when planning and delivering anticancer treatment, but a comprehensive assessment of how a patient feels requires a thorough inquiry. A standardized measurement of patients' quality of life may support clinicians in identifying important problems for discussion during the limited time of the medical consultations. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of computer-administered individual quality of life measurements in oncology clinics with immediate feedback of results to clinicians and to examine the impact of the information on consultations. The study employed a prospective non-randomized design with pre-test post-test within subjects comparisons and involved three medical oncologists and 28 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of completion of quality of life questionnaires before the consultations and informing clinicians of the results. The main outcome measures were patients' perceptions of the content of baseline and intervention consultations and satisfaction with communication. A qualitative analysis of clinicians' interviews was performed. When clinicians had the quality of life results they enquired more often about daily activities (Z= -2.71, P=0.007), emotional problems (Z= -2.11, P=0.035) and work related issues (Z= -1.89, P=0.058). There was an increase in the number of issues discussed during the intervention consultation (Z= -1.89, P=0.059). Patients were highly satisfied with both consultations. The computer measurement was well accepted by patients who felt that the questionnaires were a useful tool to tell the doctors about their problems. The clinicians perceived that the quality of life data broadened the range of the clinical inquiry and helped them identify issues for discussion. Having symptoms and functional problems expressed quantitatively on a scale was useful for detection of change over time.

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Example of the graphic print-out of the quality of life results.
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fig1: Example of the graphic print-out of the quality of life results.

Mentions: Both questionnaires were administered in electronic format using computers with touch-screen monitors (the software was developed by AB Smith and can be obtained by writing to the author). The responses were scored immediately and the results were printed in two different formats – numerical (only present results) and graphical (incorporating present and previous results) (Figure 1Figure 1


Computer-based quality of life questionnaires may contribute to doctor-patient interactions in oncology.

Velikova G, Brown JM, Smith AB, Selby PJ - Br. J. Cancer (2002)

Example of the graphic print-out of the quality of life results.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2746549&req=5

fig1: Example of the graphic print-out of the quality of life results.
Mentions: Both questionnaires were administered in electronic format using computers with touch-screen monitors (the software was developed by AB Smith and can be obtained by writing to the author). The responses were scored immediately and the results were printed in two different formats – numerical (only present results) and graphical (incorporating present and previous results) (Figure 1Figure 1

Bottom Line: The intervention consisted of completion of quality of life questionnaires before the consultations and informing clinicians of the results.When clinicians had the quality of life results they enquired more often about daily activities (Z= -2.71, P=0.007), emotional problems (Z= -2.11, P=0.035) and work related issues (Z= -1.89, P=0.058).Having symptoms and functional problems expressed quantitatively on a scale was useful for detection of change over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Imperial Cancer Research Fund Cancer Medicine Research Unit, St James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. csjgv@leeds.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
It is well recognized that oncologists should consider patients' quality of life and functioning when planning and delivering anticancer treatment, but a comprehensive assessment of how a patient feels requires a thorough inquiry. A standardized measurement of patients' quality of life may support clinicians in identifying important problems for discussion during the limited time of the medical consultations. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of computer-administered individual quality of life measurements in oncology clinics with immediate feedback of results to clinicians and to examine the impact of the information on consultations. The study employed a prospective non-randomized design with pre-test post-test within subjects comparisons and involved three medical oncologists and 28 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of completion of quality of life questionnaires before the consultations and informing clinicians of the results. The main outcome measures were patients' perceptions of the content of baseline and intervention consultations and satisfaction with communication. A qualitative analysis of clinicians' interviews was performed. When clinicians had the quality of life results they enquired more often about daily activities (Z= -2.71, P=0.007), emotional problems (Z= -2.11, P=0.035) and work related issues (Z= -1.89, P=0.058). There was an increase in the number of issues discussed during the intervention consultation (Z= -1.89, P=0.059). Patients were highly satisfied with both consultations. The computer measurement was well accepted by patients who felt that the questionnaires were a useful tool to tell the doctors about their problems. The clinicians perceived that the quality of life data broadened the range of the clinical inquiry and helped them identify issues for discussion. Having symptoms and functional problems expressed quantitatively on a scale was useful for detection of change over time.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus