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Physical activity patterns and prevention of weight gain in premenopausal women.

Mekary RA, Feskanich D, Malspeis S, Hu FB, Willett WC, Field AE - Int J Obes (Lond) (2009)

Bottom Line: Greater duration of PA was associated with progressively less weight gain, but even an 11-20 min d(-1) increase was beneficial; the benefits appeared stronger among those who were initially overweight.Sustained PA for at least 30 min d(-1), particularly if more intense, is associated with a reduction in long-term weight gain, and greater duration is associated with less weight gain.Sedentary women of any baseline weight who increase their PA will benefit, but overweight women appear to benefit the most.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 2115, USA. Rmekary@hsph.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies of the association between physical activity (PA) and weight maintenance have been inconsistent.

Methods: We prospectively examined the association between PA patterns and prevention of weight gain among 46 754 healthy premenopausal women, aged 25-43 years in 1989. Participants reported their PA and weight in 1989 and 1997. The primary outcome was gaining >5% of baseline weight by 1997 (62% of the population).

Results: Compared with women who maintained <30 min d(-1) of total discretionary activity over 8 years, women were less likely to gain weight if they sustained 30+ min d(-1) (odds ratio (OR)=0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.73) or increased to 30+ min d(-1) in 1997 (OR=0.64, 95%CI=0.60-0.68). Among women whose only reported activity was walking, risk of gaining weight was lower in those who sustained 30+ min d(-1) over 8 years (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.49-0.91), and brisk walking pace independently predicted less weight gain. For a 30 min d(-1) increase between 1989 and 1997, jogging/running was associated with less weight gain than brisk walking or other activities. Greater duration of PA was associated with progressively less weight gain, but even an 11-20 min d(-1) increase was beneficial; the benefits appeared stronger among those who were initially overweight. Sedentary behavior independently predicted weight gain.

Conclusions: Sustained PA for at least 30 min d(-1), particularly if more intense, is associated with a reduction in long-term weight gain, and greater duration is associated with less weight gain. Sedentary women of any baseline weight who increase their PA will benefit, but overweight women appear to benefit the most.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Figures 1A–B–C. The reference category (Ref) reflects women who were initially low in physical activity in 1989 and who remained in this low category in 1997.
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Figure 1: Figures 1A–B–C. The reference category (Ref) reflects women who were initially low in physical activity in 1989 and who remained in this low category in 1997.

Mentions: In logistic models evaluating changes in min/d of activity types between 1989 and 1997, odds of weight gain were somewhat elevated for those who were highly active in 1989 (60–240 min/d) but decreased their PA in 1997 to 0–10 min/d (OR=1.23, 95%CI=1.06–1.41), or to 11–20 min/d (OR=1.21, 95%CI=1.04–1.40), but not to 21–30 min/d (OR=0.97, 95%CI=0.84–1.12). Furthermore, even a small increase in total discretionary activity to 11–20 min/d in 1997 was associated with reduced odds of weight gain (OR=0.75, 95%CI=0.68–0.83), compared with the reference category (lo89lo97). There was a significant overall trend of lower odds of weight gain with increased PA over time (overall P for trend <0.001), and a similar inverse dose-response relationship was seen at all levels of baseline activity (figure 1A). A similar pattern for weight gain was seen with changes in walking (figure 1B, overall p for trend<0.001) or jogging/running (figure 1C, overall p for trend<0.001), with no apparent threshold.


Physical activity patterns and prevention of weight gain in premenopausal women.

Mekary RA, Feskanich D, Malspeis S, Hu FB, Willett WC, Field AE - Int J Obes (Lond) (2009)

Figures 1A–B–C. The reference category (Ref) reflects women who were initially low in physical activity in 1989 and who remained in this low category in 1997.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2746452&req=5

Figure 1: Figures 1A–B–C. The reference category (Ref) reflects women who were initially low in physical activity in 1989 and who remained in this low category in 1997.
Mentions: In logistic models evaluating changes in min/d of activity types between 1989 and 1997, odds of weight gain were somewhat elevated for those who were highly active in 1989 (60–240 min/d) but decreased their PA in 1997 to 0–10 min/d (OR=1.23, 95%CI=1.06–1.41), or to 11–20 min/d (OR=1.21, 95%CI=1.04–1.40), but not to 21–30 min/d (OR=0.97, 95%CI=0.84–1.12). Furthermore, even a small increase in total discretionary activity to 11–20 min/d in 1997 was associated with reduced odds of weight gain (OR=0.75, 95%CI=0.68–0.83), compared with the reference category (lo89lo97). There was a significant overall trend of lower odds of weight gain with increased PA over time (overall P for trend <0.001), and a similar inverse dose-response relationship was seen at all levels of baseline activity (figure 1A). A similar pattern for weight gain was seen with changes in walking (figure 1B, overall p for trend<0.001) or jogging/running (figure 1C, overall p for trend<0.001), with no apparent threshold.

Bottom Line: Greater duration of PA was associated with progressively less weight gain, but even an 11-20 min d(-1) increase was beneficial; the benefits appeared stronger among those who were initially overweight.Sustained PA for at least 30 min d(-1), particularly if more intense, is associated with a reduction in long-term weight gain, and greater duration is associated with less weight gain.Sedentary women of any baseline weight who increase their PA will benefit, but overweight women appear to benefit the most.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 2115, USA. Rmekary@hsph.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies of the association between physical activity (PA) and weight maintenance have been inconsistent.

Methods: We prospectively examined the association between PA patterns and prevention of weight gain among 46 754 healthy premenopausal women, aged 25-43 years in 1989. Participants reported their PA and weight in 1989 and 1997. The primary outcome was gaining >5% of baseline weight by 1997 (62% of the population).

Results: Compared with women who maintained <30 min d(-1) of total discretionary activity over 8 years, women were less likely to gain weight if they sustained 30+ min d(-1) (odds ratio (OR)=0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.73) or increased to 30+ min d(-1) in 1997 (OR=0.64, 95%CI=0.60-0.68). Among women whose only reported activity was walking, risk of gaining weight was lower in those who sustained 30+ min d(-1) over 8 years (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.49-0.91), and brisk walking pace independently predicted less weight gain. For a 30 min d(-1) increase between 1989 and 1997, jogging/running was associated with less weight gain than brisk walking or other activities. Greater duration of PA was associated with progressively less weight gain, but even an 11-20 min d(-1) increase was beneficial; the benefits appeared stronger among those who were initially overweight. Sedentary behavior independently predicted weight gain.

Conclusions: Sustained PA for at least 30 min d(-1), particularly if more intense, is associated with a reduction in long-term weight gain, and greater duration is associated with less weight gain. Sedentary women of any baseline weight who increase their PA will benefit, but overweight women appear to benefit the most.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus