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Where do students in the health professions want to work?

Schofield D, Fletcher S, Fuller J, Birden H, Page S - Hum Resour Health (2009)

Bottom Line: The type of work available in rural areas was found to be the factor most likely to encourage students to practice rurally, followed by career opportunities and challenge.The decision to practise rurally is the result of a complex interaction between a number of factors including ethnicity, discipline, age and sex, among others.Incentives that aim to entice all students to rural practice while considering only one of these variables are likely to be inadequate.

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Affiliation: Northern Rivers University Department of Rural Health, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Lismore, Australia. deborah.schofield@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. While a number of schemes have been developed to improve recruitment to and retention of the rural health workforce, they will be effective only if appropriately targeted. This study examines the factors that most encourage students attending rural clinical placements to work in rural Australia, and the regions they prefer.

Methods: The Careers in Rural Health Tracking Survey was used to examine the factors that most influence medical, nursing and allied health students' preference for practice locations and the locations preferred.

Results: Students showed a preference for working in large urban centres within one year, but would consider moving to a more rural location later in life. Only 10% of students surveyed said they would never work in a rural community with a population of less than 10,000. Almost half the sample (45%) reported wanting to work overseas within five years. The type of work available in rural areas was found to be the factor most likely to encourage students to practice rurally, followed by career opportunities and challenge.

Conclusion: The decision to practise rurally is the result of a complex interaction between a number of factors including ethnicity, discipline, age and sex, among others. Incentives that aim to entice all students to rural practice while considering only one of these variables are likely to be inadequate.

No MeSH data available.


Student location preferences.
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Figure 2: Student location preferences.

Mentions: Figure 2 indicates that 40% of students want to work in larger centres within one year, while small rural communities appear to be more attractive than cities in the longer term (17% compared to 13% for capital cities, in 5+ years). Few students indicated that they would never want to work in a rural area (10%). A large number of students were unsure about working rurally (23% in a small town and 28% in a rural community). Nearly half the students (45%) were looking to work overseas within the next five years. (It should be noted that students could select each period more than once, e.g. happy to work in a capital city, major urban centre or overseas in the next year. Therefore, percentages within each category along the x-axis do not add to 100. Percentages within each location do, however.)


Where do students in the health professions want to work?

Schofield D, Fletcher S, Fuller J, Birden H, Page S - Hum Resour Health (2009)

Student location preferences.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2746176&req=5

Figure 2: Student location preferences.
Mentions: Figure 2 indicates that 40% of students want to work in larger centres within one year, while small rural communities appear to be more attractive than cities in the longer term (17% compared to 13% for capital cities, in 5+ years). Few students indicated that they would never want to work in a rural area (10%). A large number of students were unsure about working rurally (23% in a small town and 28% in a rural community). Nearly half the students (45%) were looking to work overseas within the next five years. (It should be noted that students could select each period more than once, e.g. happy to work in a capital city, major urban centre or overseas in the next year. Therefore, percentages within each category along the x-axis do not add to 100. Percentages within each location do, however.)

Bottom Line: The type of work available in rural areas was found to be the factor most likely to encourage students to practice rurally, followed by career opportunities and challenge.The decision to practise rurally is the result of a complex interaction between a number of factors including ethnicity, discipline, age and sex, among others.Incentives that aim to entice all students to rural practice while considering only one of these variables are likely to be inadequate.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Northern Rivers University Department of Rural Health, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Lismore, Australia. deborah.schofield@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. While a number of schemes have been developed to improve recruitment to and retention of the rural health workforce, they will be effective only if appropriately targeted. This study examines the factors that most encourage students attending rural clinical placements to work in rural Australia, and the regions they prefer.

Methods: The Careers in Rural Health Tracking Survey was used to examine the factors that most influence medical, nursing and allied health students' preference for practice locations and the locations preferred.

Results: Students showed a preference for working in large urban centres within one year, but would consider moving to a more rural location later in life. Only 10% of students surveyed said they would never work in a rural community with a population of less than 10,000. Almost half the sample (45%) reported wanting to work overseas within five years. The type of work available in rural areas was found to be the factor most likely to encourage students to practice rurally, followed by career opportunities and challenge.

Conclusion: The decision to practise rurally is the result of a complex interaction between a number of factors including ethnicity, discipline, age and sex, among others. Incentives that aim to entice all students to rural practice while considering only one of these variables are likely to be inadequate.

No MeSH data available.