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Spatial and temporal dynamics of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in wild rodents, northern Italy.

Tagliapietra V, Rosà R, Hauffe HC, Laakkonen J, Voutilainen L, Vapalahti O, Vaheri A, Henttonen H, Rizzoli A - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: LCMV is circulating among the most widespread and common wild rodent species in this area (Apodemus flavicollis, Myodes glareolus, and Microtus arvalis); overall prevalence is 6.8%.At the individual level, weight and sex appeared to correlate with antibody prevalence, which suggests that horizontal transmission of LCMV occurs principally among heavier, older males and occurs during fighting.Isolation and genetic characterization of this virus will be the crucial next steps for a better understanding of its ecology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Edmund Mach Foundation-Istituto Agrario di San Michele all'Adige, San Michele all'Adige, Italy. tagliapietra@cealp.it

ABSTRACT
We determined the prevalence of infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) among small mammals in northern Italy and analyzed long-term dynamics of LCMV in a rodent population in the province of Trento. LCMV is circulating among the most widespread and common wild rodent species in this area (Apodemus flavicollis, Myodes glareolus, and Microtus arvalis); overall prevalence is 6.8%. During 2000-2006, intensive monitoring of LCMV in a population of yellow-necked mice (A. flavicollis) showed a positive correlation between prevalence of infection and rodent density. At the individual level, weight and sex appeared to correlate with antibody prevalence, which suggests that horizontal transmission of LCMV occurs principally among heavier, older males and occurs during fighting. Isolation and genetic characterization of this virus will be the crucial next steps for a better understanding of its ecology.

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Monthly number of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus–positive animals and mean rodent density per month (pooled data), northern Italy, 2000–2006.
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Figure 4: Monthly number of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus–positive animals and mean rodent density per month (pooled data), northern Italy, 2000–2006.

Mentions: The model that best explains the difference in LCMV seroprevalence at the population level includes trapping year and rodent density. Specifically, model coefficients showed a significant difference in prevalence among trapping years (F6,1579 = 15.13, p<0.001) and a positive correlation with rodent density (F1,1579 = 68.36, p<0.001) (Figures 3, 4).


Spatial and temporal dynamics of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in wild rodents, northern Italy.

Tagliapietra V, Rosà R, Hauffe HC, Laakkonen J, Voutilainen L, Vapalahti O, Vaheri A, Henttonen H, Rizzoli A - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Monthly number of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus–positive animals and mean rodent density per month (pooled data), northern Italy, 2000–2006.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2744257&req=5

Figure 4: Monthly number of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus–positive animals and mean rodent density per month (pooled data), northern Italy, 2000–2006.
Mentions: The model that best explains the difference in LCMV seroprevalence at the population level includes trapping year and rodent density. Specifically, model coefficients showed a significant difference in prevalence among trapping years (F6,1579 = 15.13, p<0.001) and a positive correlation with rodent density (F1,1579 = 68.36, p<0.001) (Figures 3, 4).

Bottom Line: LCMV is circulating among the most widespread and common wild rodent species in this area (Apodemus flavicollis, Myodes glareolus, and Microtus arvalis); overall prevalence is 6.8%.At the individual level, weight and sex appeared to correlate with antibody prevalence, which suggests that horizontal transmission of LCMV occurs principally among heavier, older males and occurs during fighting.Isolation and genetic characterization of this virus will be the crucial next steps for a better understanding of its ecology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Edmund Mach Foundation-Istituto Agrario di San Michele all'Adige, San Michele all'Adige, Italy. tagliapietra@cealp.it

ABSTRACT
We determined the prevalence of infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) among small mammals in northern Italy and analyzed long-term dynamics of LCMV in a rodent population in the province of Trento. LCMV is circulating among the most widespread and common wild rodent species in this area (Apodemus flavicollis, Myodes glareolus, and Microtus arvalis); overall prevalence is 6.8%. During 2000-2006, intensive monitoring of LCMV in a population of yellow-necked mice (A. flavicollis) showed a positive correlation between prevalence of infection and rodent density. At the individual level, weight and sex appeared to correlate with antibody prevalence, which suggests that horizontal transmission of LCMV occurs principally among heavier, older males and occurs during fighting. Isolation and genetic characterization of this virus will be the crucial next steps for a better understanding of its ecology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus