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Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.

Chapman AS, Swerdlow DL, Dato VM, Anderson AD, Moodie CE, Marriott C, Amman B, Hennessey M, Fox P, Green DB, Pegg E, Nicholson WL, Eremeeva ME, Dasch GA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed.Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii.Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.

ABSTRACT
In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Wilderness camp, Pennsylvania, USA, showing areas where flying squirrels were trapped over a 5-day period during March 2006 for Rickettsia prowazekii testing. Cabins and tent sites are designated by letters A, B, C, D, E, F, and Tent. Field sites are designated FS-1 and FS-2.
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Figure 1: Wilderness camp, Pennsylvania, USA, showing areas where flying squirrels were trapped over a 5-day period during March 2006 for Rickettsia prowazekii testing. Cabins and tent sites are designated by letters A, B, C, D, E, F, and Tent. Field sites are designated FS-1 and FS-2.

Mentions: During the winter (October–March), staff and students had lived in 1 of 6 cabins (cabins A–F); during the rest of the year, they had slept in tents (Figure). All 6 cabins were inspected for evidence of animal infestation, including flying squirrels, and for openings where flying squirrels could enter the cabins. In March 2006, baited live trapping using Sherman box traps (H.B. Sherman Traps, Tallahassee, FL, USA) was conducted on 5 consecutive nights throughout the camp. Trapping sites included a tent site occupied only during summer; sites of cabins A, B, and F; and 2 nearby sites not directly associated with the cabins.


Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.

Chapman AS, Swerdlow DL, Dato VM, Anderson AD, Moodie CE, Marriott C, Amman B, Hennessey M, Fox P, Green DB, Pegg E, Nicholson WL, Eremeeva ME, Dasch GA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Wilderness camp, Pennsylvania, USA, showing areas where flying squirrels were trapped over a 5-day period during March 2006 for Rickettsia prowazekii testing. Cabins and tent sites are designated by letters A, B, C, D, E, F, and Tent. Field sites are designated FS-1 and FS-2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2744229&req=5

Figure 1: Wilderness camp, Pennsylvania, USA, showing areas where flying squirrels were trapped over a 5-day period during March 2006 for Rickettsia prowazekii testing. Cabins and tent sites are designated by letters A, B, C, D, E, F, and Tent. Field sites are designated FS-1 and FS-2.
Mentions: During the winter (October–March), staff and students had lived in 1 of 6 cabins (cabins A–F); during the rest of the year, they had slept in tents (Figure). All 6 cabins were inspected for evidence of animal infestation, including flying squirrels, and for openings where flying squirrels could enter the cabins. In March 2006, baited live trapping using Sherman box traps (H.B. Sherman Traps, Tallahassee, FL, USA) was conducted on 5 consecutive nights throughout the camp. Trapping sites included a tent site occupied only during summer; sites of cabins A, B, and F; and 2 nearby sites not directly associated with the cabins.

Bottom Line: All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed.Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii.Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.

ABSTRACT
In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus