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Pathology, pathogenesis and therapy of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary adenomas: technical advances in histochemistry and their contribution.

Osamura RY, Egashira N, Kajiya H, Takei M, Tobita M, Miyakoshi T, Inomoto C, Takekoshi S, Teramoto A - Acta Histochem Cytochem (2009)

Bottom Line: Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals.Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy.In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara-city, Kanagawa 259-1193, Japan. osamura@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Growth hormone (GH)-producing adenomas (GHomas) are one of the most frequently-occurring pituitary adenomas. Differentiation of hormone-producing cells in the pituitary gland is regulated by transcription factors and co-factors. The transcription factors include Pit-1, Prop-1, NeuroD1, Tpit, GATA-2, SF-1. Aberrant expression of transcription factors such as Pit-1 results in translineage expression of GH in adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenomas (ACTHomas). This situation has been substantiated by GFP-Pit-1 transfection expression in the AtT20 cell line. Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy. In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental induction of GH by GFP-Pit-1 gene transfection in AtT20 cells. The cells with nuclear fluorescence were collected in “live state” by laser microdissection (PALM Carl Zeiss). Compared with those having cytoplasmic fluorescence, the cells with nuclear fluorescence (yellow star) demonstrated exclusive expression of Pit-1mRNA and GHmRNA by quantitative RT-PCR (upper panel).
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Figure 6: Experimental induction of GH by GFP-Pit-1 gene transfection in AtT20 cells. The cells with nuclear fluorescence were collected in “live state” by laser microdissection (PALM Carl Zeiss). Compared with those having cytoplasmic fluorescence, the cells with nuclear fluorescence (yellow star) demonstrated exclusive expression of Pit-1mRNA and GHmRNA by quantitative RT-PCR (upper panel).

Mentions: In order to reproduce the human condition of the aberrant expression of GH in ACTH adenomas, an in vitro experimental model was designed by transfecting a Pit1-GFP construct into the Pit-1-negative/GH negative AtT20 cell line [10]. AtT20 cells with nuclear GFP expression showed Pit-1 mRNA and GH mRNA by RT-PCR indicating that Pit-1 binding to DNA induced GH expression (Fig. 6).


Pathology, pathogenesis and therapy of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary adenomas: technical advances in histochemistry and their contribution.

Osamura RY, Egashira N, Kajiya H, Takei M, Tobita M, Miyakoshi T, Inomoto C, Takekoshi S, Teramoto A - Acta Histochem Cytochem (2009)

Experimental induction of GH by GFP-Pit-1 gene transfection in AtT20 cells. The cells with nuclear fluorescence were collected in “live state” by laser microdissection (PALM Carl Zeiss). Compared with those having cytoplasmic fluorescence, the cells with nuclear fluorescence (yellow star) demonstrated exclusive expression of Pit-1mRNA and GHmRNA by quantitative RT-PCR (upper panel).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2742723&req=5

Figure 6: Experimental induction of GH by GFP-Pit-1 gene transfection in AtT20 cells. The cells with nuclear fluorescence were collected in “live state” by laser microdissection (PALM Carl Zeiss). Compared with those having cytoplasmic fluorescence, the cells with nuclear fluorescence (yellow star) demonstrated exclusive expression of Pit-1mRNA and GHmRNA by quantitative RT-PCR (upper panel).
Mentions: In order to reproduce the human condition of the aberrant expression of GH in ACTH adenomas, an in vitro experimental model was designed by transfecting a Pit1-GFP construct into the Pit-1-negative/GH negative AtT20 cell line [10]. AtT20 cells with nuclear GFP expression showed Pit-1 mRNA and GH mRNA by RT-PCR indicating that Pit-1 binding to DNA induced GH expression (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals.Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy.In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara-city, Kanagawa 259-1193, Japan. osamura@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Growth hormone (GH)-producing adenomas (GHomas) are one of the most frequently-occurring pituitary adenomas. Differentiation of hormone-producing cells in the pituitary gland is regulated by transcription factors and co-factors. The transcription factors include Pit-1, Prop-1, NeuroD1, Tpit, GATA-2, SF-1. Aberrant expression of transcription factors such as Pit-1 results in translineage expression of GH in adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenomas (ACTHomas). This situation has been substantiated by GFP-Pit-1 transfection expression in the AtT20 cell line. Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy. In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus