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Segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity.

Krienen FM, Buckner RL - Cereb. Cortex (2009)

Bottom Line: The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network.Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions.We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. krienen@wjh.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT
Multiple, segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits have been characterized in nonhuman primates using transneuronal tracing techniques including those that target prefrontal areas. Here, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in humans (n = 40) to identify 4 topographically distinct fronto-cerebellar circuits that target 1) motor cortex, 2) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, 3) medial prefrontal cortex, and 4) anterior prefrontal cortex. All 4 circuits were replicated and dissociated in an independent data set (n = 40). Direct comparison of right- and left-seeded frontal regions revealed contralateral lateralization in the cerebellum for each of the segregated circuits. The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network. Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions. We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

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Fronto-cerebellar circuits in individual subjects. The same comparisons in Figure 3 are computed individually for 3 representative subjects. Results are overlayed on each subject's own anatomical volume. Although the locations of the peak correlations vary somewhat, the overall pattern of functional connectivity is similar to that seen at the group level.
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fig4: Fronto-cerebellar circuits in individual subjects. The same comparisons in Figure 3 are computed individually for 3 representative subjects. Results are overlayed on each subject's own anatomical volume. Although the locations of the peak correlations vary somewhat, the overall pattern of functional connectivity is similar to that seen at the group level.

Mentions: We are cautious about claiming precise anatomical localization of our findings due to the smoothing and averaging of our functional data. However, in addition to the group-averaged maps, we also inspected the maps of individual subjects to determine whether the same general patterns also hold at the single-subject level. Figure 4 shows the results of the above comparisons carried out in 3 subjects projected onto their respective anatomical volumes. The dissociations in the cerebellum are evident even at the individual-subject level.


Segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity.

Krienen FM, Buckner RL - Cereb. Cortex (2009)

Fronto-cerebellar circuits in individual subjects. The same comparisons in Figure 3 are computed individually for 3 representative subjects. Results are overlayed on each subject's own anatomical volume. Although the locations of the peak correlations vary somewhat, the overall pattern of functional connectivity is similar to that seen at the group level.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2742600&req=5

fig4: Fronto-cerebellar circuits in individual subjects. The same comparisons in Figure 3 are computed individually for 3 representative subjects. Results are overlayed on each subject's own anatomical volume. Although the locations of the peak correlations vary somewhat, the overall pattern of functional connectivity is similar to that seen at the group level.
Mentions: We are cautious about claiming precise anatomical localization of our findings due to the smoothing and averaging of our functional data. However, in addition to the group-averaged maps, we also inspected the maps of individual subjects to determine whether the same general patterns also hold at the single-subject level. Figure 4 shows the results of the above comparisons carried out in 3 subjects projected onto their respective anatomical volumes. The dissociations in the cerebellum are evident even at the individual-subject level.

Bottom Line: The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network.Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions.We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. krienen@wjh.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT
Multiple, segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits have been characterized in nonhuman primates using transneuronal tracing techniques including those that target prefrontal areas. Here, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in humans (n = 40) to identify 4 topographically distinct fronto-cerebellar circuits that target 1) motor cortex, 2) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, 3) medial prefrontal cortex, and 4) anterior prefrontal cortex. All 4 circuits were replicated and dissociated in an independent data set (n = 40). Direct comparison of right- and left-seeded frontal regions revealed contralateral lateralization in the cerebellum for each of the segregated circuits. The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network. Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions. We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

Show MeSH