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Segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity.

Krienen FM, Buckner RL - Cereb. Cortex (2009)

Bottom Line: The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network.Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions.We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. krienen@wjh.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT
Multiple, segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits have been characterized in nonhuman primates using transneuronal tracing techniques including those that target prefrontal areas. Here, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in humans (n = 40) to identify 4 topographically distinct fronto-cerebellar circuits that target 1) motor cortex, 2) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, 3) medial prefrontal cortex, and 4) anterior prefrontal cortex. All 4 circuits were replicated and dissociated in an independent data set (n = 40). Direct comparison of right- and left-seeded frontal regions revealed contralateral lateralization in the cerebellum for each of the segregated circuits. The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network. Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions. We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

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The cerebellum contains at least 4 distinct zones associated with frontal cortex. To illustrate the presence of multiple fronto-cerebellar circuits, maps from distinct frontal seeds are directly compared. Each panel shows the regions being subtracted (left) and the resulting correlation map (right). Maps are at a threshold of z(r) > 0.1. (A) MOT–DLPFC results in preferential correlations with MOT in lobule V in the anterior hemisphere as well as in lobule VIIIB. Preferentially DLPFC-correlated regions include Crus I, Crus II, VIIB, and IX. (B) DLPFC–MPFC further divides the posterior cerebellum: MPFC has greater correlations with Crus I, whereas DLPFC has relatively greater correlations with Crus II (C) MPFC–APFC dissociates in anterior cerebellum betweeen Crus I and lobule VI, respectively. In ventral cerebellum, MPFC preferentially correlates with IX, whereas APFC correlates with VIIIA. (D) APFC–MOT: APFC preferentially correlates with VI, whereas MOT correlates with lobule V in the anterior lobe. APFC continues to correlate with the extent of VI moving ventrally and also appears to correlate with VIIB–VIIIA and Crus II at the ansoparamedian fissure, whereas MOT retains correlations in VIIIB. Numbers refer to the z coordinate plane of the cerebellar slice.
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fig3: The cerebellum contains at least 4 distinct zones associated with frontal cortex. To illustrate the presence of multiple fronto-cerebellar circuits, maps from distinct frontal seeds are directly compared. Each panel shows the regions being subtracted (left) and the resulting correlation map (right). Maps are at a threshold of z(r) > 0.1. (A) MOT–DLPFC results in preferential correlations with MOT in lobule V in the anterior hemisphere as well as in lobule VIIIB. Preferentially DLPFC-correlated regions include Crus I, Crus II, VIIB, and IX. (B) DLPFC–MPFC further divides the posterior cerebellum: MPFC has greater correlations with Crus I, whereas DLPFC has relatively greater correlations with Crus II (C) MPFC–APFC dissociates in anterior cerebellum betweeen Crus I and lobule VI, respectively. In ventral cerebellum, MPFC preferentially correlates with IX, whereas APFC correlates with VIIIA. (D) APFC–MOT: APFC preferentially correlates with VI, whereas MOT correlates with lobule V in the anterior lobe. APFC continues to correlate with the extent of VI moving ventrally and also appears to correlate with VIIB–VIIIA and Crus II at the ansoparamedian fissure, whereas MOT retains correlations in VIIIB. Numbers refer to the z coordinate plane of the cerebellar slice.

Mentions: Having established that fcMRI can map distinct fronto-cerebellar circuits, we next extended the approach to map the cerebellar targets of 4 separate frontal regions: MOT, DLPFC, MPFC, and APFC. For these analyses, because between-circuit contrasts were the target and not evidence for lateralization, bilateral seeds were used to increase statistical power. Figure 3 displays subtractions between 2 given maps, effectively revealing the relative differences in correlation patterns for different fronto-cerebellar connections.


Segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity.

Krienen FM, Buckner RL - Cereb. Cortex (2009)

The cerebellum contains at least 4 distinct zones associated with frontal cortex. To illustrate the presence of multiple fronto-cerebellar circuits, maps from distinct frontal seeds are directly compared. Each panel shows the regions being subtracted (left) and the resulting correlation map (right). Maps are at a threshold of z(r) > 0.1. (A) MOT–DLPFC results in preferential correlations with MOT in lobule V in the anterior hemisphere as well as in lobule VIIIB. Preferentially DLPFC-correlated regions include Crus I, Crus II, VIIB, and IX. (B) DLPFC–MPFC further divides the posterior cerebellum: MPFC has greater correlations with Crus I, whereas DLPFC has relatively greater correlations with Crus II (C) MPFC–APFC dissociates in anterior cerebellum betweeen Crus I and lobule VI, respectively. In ventral cerebellum, MPFC preferentially correlates with IX, whereas APFC correlates with VIIIA. (D) APFC–MOT: APFC preferentially correlates with VI, whereas MOT correlates with lobule V in the anterior lobe. APFC continues to correlate with the extent of VI moving ventrally and also appears to correlate with VIIB–VIIIA and Crus II at the ansoparamedian fissure, whereas MOT retains correlations in VIIIB. Numbers refer to the z coordinate plane of the cerebellar slice.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2742600&req=5

fig3: The cerebellum contains at least 4 distinct zones associated with frontal cortex. To illustrate the presence of multiple fronto-cerebellar circuits, maps from distinct frontal seeds are directly compared. Each panel shows the regions being subtracted (left) and the resulting correlation map (right). Maps are at a threshold of z(r) > 0.1. (A) MOT–DLPFC results in preferential correlations with MOT in lobule V in the anterior hemisphere as well as in lobule VIIIB. Preferentially DLPFC-correlated regions include Crus I, Crus II, VIIB, and IX. (B) DLPFC–MPFC further divides the posterior cerebellum: MPFC has greater correlations with Crus I, whereas DLPFC has relatively greater correlations with Crus II (C) MPFC–APFC dissociates in anterior cerebellum betweeen Crus I and lobule VI, respectively. In ventral cerebellum, MPFC preferentially correlates with IX, whereas APFC correlates with VIIIA. (D) APFC–MOT: APFC preferentially correlates with VI, whereas MOT correlates with lobule V in the anterior lobe. APFC continues to correlate with the extent of VI moving ventrally and also appears to correlate with VIIB–VIIIA and Crus II at the ansoparamedian fissure, whereas MOT retains correlations in VIIIB. Numbers refer to the z coordinate plane of the cerebellar slice.
Mentions: Having established that fcMRI can map distinct fronto-cerebellar circuits, we next extended the approach to map the cerebellar targets of 4 separate frontal regions: MOT, DLPFC, MPFC, and APFC. For these analyses, because between-circuit contrasts were the target and not evidence for lateralization, bilateral seeds were used to increase statistical power. Figure 3 displays subtractions between 2 given maps, effectively revealing the relative differences in correlation patterns for different fronto-cerebellar connections.

Bottom Line: The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network.Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions.We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. krienen@wjh.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT
Multiple, segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits have been characterized in nonhuman primates using transneuronal tracing techniques including those that target prefrontal areas. Here, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in humans (n = 40) to identify 4 topographically distinct fronto-cerebellar circuits that target 1) motor cortex, 2) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, 3) medial prefrontal cortex, and 4) anterior prefrontal cortex. All 4 circuits were replicated and dissociated in an independent data set (n = 40). Direct comparison of right- and left-seeded frontal regions revealed contralateral lateralization in the cerebellum for each of the segregated circuits. The presence of circuits that involve prefrontal regions confirms that the cerebellum participates in networks important to cognition including a specific fronto-cerebellar circuit that interacts with the default network. Overall, the extent of the cerebellum associated with prefrontal cortex included a large portion of the posterior hemispheres consistent with a prominent role of the cerebellum in nonmotor functions. We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex.

Show MeSH