Limits...
Extensive ameloblastic fibroma in an adolescent patient: a case report with a follow-up of 4 years.

Pitak-Arnnop P, Chaine A, Dhanuthai K, Bertrand JC, Bertolus C - Eur J Dent (2009)

Bottom Line: The patient has continued to be followed closely and has been disease-free for 4 years.Recent evidence suggests that the recurrent rate of AF is relatively high, and malignant transformation of AF may occur after recurrences or multiple surgeries.A conservative treatment approach with close surveillance is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PhD candidate and resident, Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Formerly, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, AP-HP, Pitié-Salpêtrière University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris 6 (Pierre et Marie Curie), Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Ameloblastic fibroma (AF) is a rare odontogenic tumour of the jaw which usually occurs in the first 2 decades of life. The common clinical manifestation is a slow-growing swelling. We report a case of a 16-year-old male patient presenting with extensive AF of the mandible. He underwent a conservative enucleation. The tumour recurred 2 years after the initial surgery, requiring the second enucleation. The patient has continued to be followed closely and has been disease-free for 4 years. Recent evidence suggests that the recurrent rate of AF is relatively high, and malignant transformation of AF may occur after recurrences or multiple surgeries. A conservative treatment approach with close surveillance is recommended. Anatomical limitations should be taken into account, especially when enucleation of AF in the posterior portion of the jaw is performed. Current surgical pathologic issues of the tumour are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrograph showing cords and islands of odontogenic epithelium in a primitive connective tissue background resembling a dental papilla without the formation of dental hard tissues (Haematoxylin & eosin stain, original magnification 40x).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2741195&req=5

f3-0030224: Photomicrograph showing cords and islands of odontogenic epithelium in a primitive connective tissue background resembling a dental papilla without the formation of dental hard tissues (Haematoxylin & eosin stain, original magnification 40x).

Mentions: Aspiration biopsy was negative, indicating a non-cystic lesion. Histological examination of the incisional biopsy tissue demonstrated strands, cords, and islands of odontogenic epithelium within immature myxoid mesenchymal tissue resembling the dental papilla (Figure 3). The definite diagnosis was AF.


Extensive ameloblastic fibroma in an adolescent patient: a case report with a follow-up of 4 years.

Pitak-Arnnop P, Chaine A, Dhanuthai K, Bertrand JC, Bertolus C - Eur J Dent (2009)

Photomicrograph showing cords and islands of odontogenic epithelium in a primitive connective tissue background resembling a dental papilla without the formation of dental hard tissues (Haematoxylin & eosin stain, original magnification 40x).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2741195&req=5

f3-0030224: Photomicrograph showing cords and islands of odontogenic epithelium in a primitive connective tissue background resembling a dental papilla without the formation of dental hard tissues (Haematoxylin & eosin stain, original magnification 40x).
Mentions: Aspiration biopsy was negative, indicating a non-cystic lesion. Histological examination of the incisional biopsy tissue demonstrated strands, cords, and islands of odontogenic epithelium within immature myxoid mesenchymal tissue resembling the dental papilla (Figure 3). The definite diagnosis was AF.

Bottom Line: The patient has continued to be followed closely and has been disease-free for 4 years.Recent evidence suggests that the recurrent rate of AF is relatively high, and malignant transformation of AF may occur after recurrences or multiple surgeries.A conservative treatment approach with close surveillance is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PhD candidate and resident, Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Formerly, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, AP-HP, Pitié-Salpêtrière University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris 6 (Pierre et Marie Curie), Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Ameloblastic fibroma (AF) is a rare odontogenic tumour of the jaw which usually occurs in the first 2 decades of life. The common clinical manifestation is a slow-growing swelling. We report a case of a 16-year-old male patient presenting with extensive AF of the mandible. He underwent a conservative enucleation. The tumour recurred 2 years after the initial surgery, requiring the second enucleation. The patient has continued to be followed closely and has been disease-free for 4 years. Recent evidence suggests that the recurrent rate of AF is relatively high, and malignant transformation of AF may occur after recurrences or multiple surgeries. A conservative treatment approach with close surveillance is recommended. Anatomical limitations should be taken into account, especially when enucleation of AF in the posterior portion of the jaw is performed. Current surgical pathologic issues of the tumour are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus