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Tumour cell contamination of autologous stem cells grafts in high-risk neuroblastoma: the good news?

Handgretinger R, Leung W, Ihm K, Lang P, Klingebiel T, Niethammer D - Br. J. Cancer (2003)

Bottom Line: We analysed the effect of graft-contaminating tumour cells on the long-term survival of 24 patients with high-risk neuroblastoma and found that patients whose grafts contained detectable neuroblastoma cells had a significantly higher probability of survival than did patients with no detectable tumour cells.Estimated contamination of the graft by more than 2000 tumour cells was associated with a significantly higher probability of survival than contamination with fewer tumour cells.We hypothesise that the presence of a critical number of graft-contaminating neuroblastoma cells can elicit a protective antitumour immune response after autologous transplantation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Stem Cell Transplantation, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Mail stop 321, 332 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38105, USA. Rupert.Handgretinger@stjude.org

ABSTRACT
We analysed the effect of graft-contaminating tumour cells on the long-term survival of 24 patients with high-risk neuroblastoma and found that patients whose grafts contained detectable neuroblastoma cells had a significantly higher probability of survival than did patients with no detectable tumour cells. Estimated contamination of the graft by more than 2000 tumour cells was associated with a significantly higher probability of survival than contamination with fewer tumour cells. We hypothesise that the presence of a critical number of graft-contaminating neuroblastoma cells can elicit a protective antitumour immune response after autologous transplantation.

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(A) Scatterplot analysis comparing the estimated absolute number of neuroblastoma cells in the autografts of patients who did and did not survive (P=0.01). (B) Comparison of relapse-free survival of patients whose autografts were estimated to contain more than 2000 cells or fewer than 2000 cells (P=0.006).
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fig2: (A) Scatterplot analysis comparing the estimated absolute number of neuroblastoma cells in the autografts of patients who did and did not survive (P=0.01). (B) Comparison of relapse-free survival of patients whose autografts were estimated to contain more than 2000 cells or fewer than 2000 cells (P=0.006).

Mentions: In order to estimate whether there would be a threshold number of protective graft-contaminating tumour cells, we calculated on the basis of the lower detection limit of our assay (one tumour cell per 105 transplanted mononuclear cells) the possible absolute number of neuroblastoma cells in the 20 grafts that had no measurable tumour cells. We assumed maximal contamination based on our observation of tumour-cell contamination in 17 of the 22 evaluable unpurged grafts and the fact that more sensitive methods of tumour detection, such as polymerase chain reaction, often reveal the presence of tumour cells after purging (Lode et al, 1997; Leung et al, 1998). This estimation showed that survivors (n=10) had a significantly larger number of tumour cells in their grafts than did patients who died of relapse (n=14) (P=0.01, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, Figure 2AFigure 2


Tumour cell contamination of autologous stem cells grafts in high-risk neuroblastoma: the good news?

Handgretinger R, Leung W, Ihm K, Lang P, Klingebiel T, Niethammer D - Br. J. Cancer (2003)

(A) Scatterplot analysis comparing the estimated absolute number of neuroblastoma cells in the autografts of patients who did and did not survive (P=0.01). (B) Comparison of relapse-free survival of patients whose autografts were estimated to contain more than 2000 cells or fewer than 2000 cells (P=0.006).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2741120&req=5

fig2: (A) Scatterplot analysis comparing the estimated absolute number of neuroblastoma cells in the autografts of patients who did and did not survive (P=0.01). (B) Comparison of relapse-free survival of patients whose autografts were estimated to contain more than 2000 cells or fewer than 2000 cells (P=0.006).
Mentions: In order to estimate whether there would be a threshold number of protective graft-contaminating tumour cells, we calculated on the basis of the lower detection limit of our assay (one tumour cell per 105 transplanted mononuclear cells) the possible absolute number of neuroblastoma cells in the 20 grafts that had no measurable tumour cells. We assumed maximal contamination based on our observation of tumour-cell contamination in 17 of the 22 evaluable unpurged grafts and the fact that more sensitive methods of tumour detection, such as polymerase chain reaction, often reveal the presence of tumour cells after purging (Lode et al, 1997; Leung et al, 1998). This estimation showed that survivors (n=10) had a significantly larger number of tumour cells in their grafts than did patients who died of relapse (n=14) (P=0.01, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, Figure 2AFigure 2

Bottom Line: We analysed the effect of graft-contaminating tumour cells on the long-term survival of 24 patients with high-risk neuroblastoma and found that patients whose grafts contained detectable neuroblastoma cells had a significantly higher probability of survival than did patients with no detectable tumour cells.Estimated contamination of the graft by more than 2000 tumour cells was associated with a significantly higher probability of survival than contamination with fewer tumour cells.We hypothesise that the presence of a critical number of graft-contaminating neuroblastoma cells can elicit a protective antitumour immune response after autologous transplantation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Stem Cell Transplantation, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Mail stop 321, 332 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38105, USA. Rupert.Handgretinger@stjude.org

ABSTRACT
We analysed the effect of graft-contaminating tumour cells on the long-term survival of 24 patients with high-risk neuroblastoma and found that patients whose grafts contained detectable neuroblastoma cells had a significantly higher probability of survival than did patients with no detectable tumour cells. Estimated contamination of the graft by more than 2000 tumour cells was associated with a significantly higher probability of survival than contamination with fewer tumour cells. We hypothesise that the presence of a critical number of graft-contaminating neuroblastoma cells can elicit a protective antitumour immune response after autologous transplantation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus