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Human papilloma virus is associated with breast cancer.

Heng B, Glenn WK, Ye Y, Tran B, Delprado W, Lutze-Mann L, Whitaker NJ, Lawson JS - Br. J. Cancer (2009)

Bottom Line: For example, it is generally accepted that HPV has a role in a significant proportion of head and neck tumours, and it has long been hypothesised that hormone dependent oncogenic viruses, such as HPV may have causal roles in some human breast cancers.In addition, we also show that the oncogenic characteristics of HPV associated breast cancer are very similar to HPV-associated cervical cancer.The above observations indicate a likely causal role for high-risk HPV in human breast cancer and offer the possibility of primary prevention of some breast cancers by vaccination against HPV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is increasing evidence that high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) is involved in cancers in addition to cervical cancer. For example, it is generally accepted that HPV has a role in a significant proportion of head and neck tumours, and it has long been hypothesised that hormone dependent oncogenic viruses, such as HPV may have causal roles in some human breast cancers. A number of reports have identified HPV DNA in breast tissue and breast cancer specimens, but these rely on standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is criticised for its propensity for contamination.

Methods: We have used two different technologies, in situ and standard PCR (with sequencing), and histology based on light microscopy.

Results: We unambiguously demonstrate the presence of high-risk HPV in the cells of breast cancer specimens and breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we also show that the oncogenic characteristics of HPV associated breast cancer are very similar to HPV-associated cervical cancer. Specifically, that putative koilocytes are present in some HPV associated breast cancers.

Interpretation: The above observations indicate a likely causal role for high-risk HPV in human breast cancer and offer the possibility of primary prevention of some breast cancers by vaccination against HPV.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Human papilloma virus (HPV) screen of patient samples using MY and GP primers. Lane M is the Puc/Hinf ladder marker. Lanes 1–7 are patient samples (breast cancer specimens 1–7). Lane 8 is HeLa DNA as the positive control. Lanes 9–11 are negative controls (water in place of DNA in reaction). Lanes 2 (specimen 2), 4 (specimen 4), 5 (specimen 5), 6 (specimen 6) and 7 (specimen 7) show positive bands of 140 bp. Both samples in lanes 1 (specimen 1) and 3 (specimen 3) are negative for HPV.
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fig3: Human papilloma virus (HPV) screen of patient samples using MY and GP primers. Lane M is the Puc/Hinf ladder marker. Lanes 1–7 are patient samples (breast cancer specimens 1–7). Lane 8 is HeLa DNA as the positive control. Lanes 9–11 are negative controls (water in place of DNA in reaction). Lanes 2 (specimen 2), 4 (specimen 4), 5 (specimen 5), 6 (specimen 6) and 7 (specimen 7) show positive bands of 140 bp. Both samples in lanes 1 (specimen 1) and 3 (specimen 3) are negative for HPV.

Mentions: In this study, we demonstrate the application of in situ PCR to identify HPV sequences within breast cancer cells. We initially screened nine breast cancer cell lines (as listed in Materials and Methods) for HPV in situ PCR. High-risk HPV gene sequences were identified in two of the cell lines (MDA-MB-175-VII and SK-BR-3) of the nine lines tested. In situ PCR demonstrated that HPV DNA was confined within the nucleus of the cells (Figure 1). The presence and type (HPV type 18) was confirmed by automated sequencing (Figure 2) of the PCR products shown in Figure 3.


Human papilloma virus is associated with breast cancer.

Heng B, Glenn WK, Ye Y, Tran B, Delprado W, Lutze-Mann L, Whitaker NJ, Lawson JS - Br. J. Cancer (2009)

Human papilloma virus (HPV) screen of patient samples using MY and GP primers. Lane M is the Puc/Hinf ladder marker. Lanes 1–7 are patient samples (breast cancer specimens 1–7). Lane 8 is HeLa DNA as the positive control. Lanes 9–11 are negative controls (water in place of DNA in reaction). Lanes 2 (specimen 2), 4 (specimen 4), 5 (specimen 5), 6 (specimen 6) and 7 (specimen 7) show positive bands of 140 bp. Both samples in lanes 1 (specimen 1) and 3 (specimen 3) are negative for HPV.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2737128&req=5

fig3: Human papilloma virus (HPV) screen of patient samples using MY and GP primers. Lane M is the Puc/Hinf ladder marker. Lanes 1–7 are patient samples (breast cancer specimens 1–7). Lane 8 is HeLa DNA as the positive control. Lanes 9–11 are negative controls (water in place of DNA in reaction). Lanes 2 (specimen 2), 4 (specimen 4), 5 (specimen 5), 6 (specimen 6) and 7 (specimen 7) show positive bands of 140 bp. Both samples in lanes 1 (specimen 1) and 3 (specimen 3) are negative for HPV.
Mentions: In this study, we demonstrate the application of in situ PCR to identify HPV sequences within breast cancer cells. We initially screened nine breast cancer cell lines (as listed in Materials and Methods) for HPV in situ PCR. High-risk HPV gene sequences were identified in two of the cell lines (MDA-MB-175-VII and SK-BR-3) of the nine lines tested. In situ PCR demonstrated that HPV DNA was confined within the nucleus of the cells (Figure 1). The presence and type (HPV type 18) was confirmed by automated sequencing (Figure 2) of the PCR products shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: For example, it is generally accepted that HPV has a role in a significant proportion of head and neck tumours, and it has long been hypothesised that hormone dependent oncogenic viruses, such as HPV may have causal roles in some human breast cancers.In addition, we also show that the oncogenic characteristics of HPV associated breast cancer are very similar to HPV-associated cervical cancer.The above observations indicate a likely causal role for high-risk HPV in human breast cancer and offer the possibility of primary prevention of some breast cancers by vaccination against HPV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is increasing evidence that high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) is involved in cancers in addition to cervical cancer. For example, it is generally accepted that HPV has a role in a significant proportion of head and neck tumours, and it has long been hypothesised that hormone dependent oncogenic viruses, such as HPV may have causal roles in some human breast cancers. A number of reports have identified HPV DNA in breast tissue and breast cancer specimens, but these rely on standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is criticised for its propensity for contamination.

Methods: We have used two different technologies, in situ and standard PCR (with sequencing), and histology based on light microscopy.

Results: We unambiguously demonstrate the presence of high-risk HPV in the cells of breast cancer specimens and breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we also show that the oncogenic characteristics of HPV associated breast cancer are very similar to HPV-associated cervical cancer. Specifically, that putative koilocytes are present in some HPV associated breast cancers.

Interpretation: The above observations indicate a likely causal role for high-risk HPV in human breast cancer and offer the possibility of primary prevention of some breast cancers by vaccination against HPV.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus