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Surveillance and monitoring. Toxics report improves, but data still limited.

Weinhold B - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

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The Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) has taken a small step toward filling this void by assembling selected basic toxics data for North America with the 10 June 2009 release of its 12th annual report, Taking Stock: 2005 North American Pollutant Releases and Transfers... The available data show that the continent’s air, water, surface, and subsurface received at least 8,484 billion kg of greenhouse gases, 32 billion kg of criteria air pollutants, and 5.5 billion kg of potentially toxic releases and transfers in 2005... In all 3 countries, large quantities of releases and transfers were reported for the chemicals manufacturing and transportation equipment manufacturing sectors... However, inconsistent reporting requirements—including nomenclature differences—preclude continent-wide comparisons of industries... TEP calculations were derived through a method developed at the University of California, Berkeley, that expresses a chemical’s developmental/reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity in terms of comparable amounts of toluene and benzene, respectively... The Berkeley method is just one of many such methods, each of which can lead to very different risk findings... TEP calculations in this report apply only to air and water releases and do not provide calculations for other health end points, such as respiratory, cardiovascular, neurologic, or immunologic damage... Of the substances reported, the CEC determined that mercury and its compounds posed by far the greatest potential health threat, with a TEP for developmental/reproductive risk equivalent to 975.2 billion kg for air releases and 187.5 billion kg for water releases... Next in terms of potential developmental/reproductive toxicity were lead and its compounds, copper and its compounds, arsenic and its compounds, and hydrochloric acid... In addition to its reproductive/developmental effects, air releases of arsenic and its compounds topped the list of carcinogens with a TEP risk equivalent of 947.0 million kg, along with 313.0 million kg for water releases... Mexican officials are reviewing health and toxicity data for some pollutants, says Orlando Cabrera-Rivera, the CEC’s program manager for air quality and PRTR... Tracking all the substances in this year’s report captures less than 0.5% of the 239,000 substances that are regulated or included in inventories worldwide and just 3% of the 30,000 chemicals that are most widely used commercially in Canada and the United States... However, points out Cabrera-Rivera, “While it would be important to include some other pollutants on the PRTR lists, this should be done by prioritizing based on sector pollutant profiles, as well as the potential risk posed by pollutants of concern, since all pollutants are not equal. ” Identifying all toxics in the environment, their by-products, and their adverse health effects remains a daunting challenge... But the obstacles to be overcome are disarmingly simple: “Time, resources, and quality of data,” Valentinetti says.

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Largest Releases/Transfers by Industry in North America
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f1-ehp-117-a390: Largest Releases/Transfers by Industry in North America


Surveillance and monitoring. Toxics report improves, but data still limited.

Weinhold B - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Largest Releases/Transfers by Industry in North America
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2737037&req=5

f1-ehp-117-a390: Largest Releases/Transfers by Industry in North America

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) has taken a small step toward filling this void by assembling selected basic toxics data for North America with the 10 June 2009 release of its 12th annual report, Taking Stock: 2005 North American Pollutant Releases and Transfers... The available data show that the continent’s air, water, surface, and subsurface received at least 8,484 billion kg of greenhouse gases, 32 billion kg of criteria air pollutants, and 5.5 billion kg of potentially toxic releases and transfers in 2005... In all 3 countries, large quantities of releases and transfers were reported for the chemicals manufacturing and transportation equipment manufacturing sectors... However, inconsistent reporting requirements—including nomenclature differences—preclude continent-wide comparisons of industries... TEP calculations were derived through a method developed at the University of California, Berkeley, that expresses a chemical’s developmental/reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity in terms of comparable amounts of toluene and benzene, respectively... The Berkeley method is just one of many such methods, each of which can lead to very different risk findings... TEP calculations in this report apply only to air and water releases and do not provide calculations for other health end points, such as respiratory, cardiovascular, neurologic, or immunologic damage... Of the substances reported, the CEC determined that mercury and its compounds posed by far the greatest potential health threat, with a TEP for developmental/reproductive risk equivalent to 975.2 billion kg for air releases and 187.5 billion kg for water releases... Next in terms of potential developmental/reproductive toxicity were lead and its compounds, copper and its compounds, arsenic and its compounds, and hydrochloric acid... In addition to its reproductive/developmental effects, air releases of arsenic and its compounds topped the list of carcinogens with a TEP risk equivalent of 947.0 million kg, along with 313.0 million kg for water releases... Mexican officials are reviewing health and toxicity data for some pollutants, says Orlando Cabrera-Rivera, the CEC’s program manager for air quality and PRTR... Tracking all the substances in this year’s report captures less than 0.5% of the 239,000 substances that are regulated or included in inventories worldwide and just 3% of the 30,000 chemicals that are most widely used commercially in Canada and the United States... However, points out Cabrera-Rivera, “While it would be important to include some other pollutants on the PRTR lists, this should be done by prioritizing based on sector pollutant profiles, as well as the potential risk posed by pollutants of concern, since all pollutants are not equal. ” Identifying all toxics in the environment, their by-products, and their adverse health effects remains a daunting challenge... But the obstacles to be overcome are disarmingly simple: “Time, resources, and quality of data,” Valentinetti says.

Show MeSH