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Serum selenium concentrations and diabetes in U.S. adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004.

Laclaustra M, Navas-Acien A, Stranges S, Ordovas JM, Guallar E - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Bottom Line: We used a cross-sectional analysis of 917 adults > or = 40 years of age who had a fasting morning blood sample in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004.The corresponding average differences (95% CI) in fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were 9.5 mg/dL (3.4-15.6 mg/dL) and 0.30% (0.14-0.46%), respectively.In spline regression models, the prevalence of diabetes as well as glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels increased with increasing selenium concentrations up to 160 microg/L.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Increasing evidence suggests that high selenium levels are associated with diabetes and other cardiometabolic risk factors.

Objectives: We evaluated the association of serum selenium concentrations with fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, and diabetes in the most recently available representative sample of the U.S. population.

Methods: We used a cross-sectional analysis of 917 adults > or = 40 years of age who had a fasting morning blood sample in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. We evaluated the association of serum selenium, measured by inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry, and diabetes, defined as a self-report of current use of hypoglycemic agents or insulin or as fasting plasma glucose > or = 126 mg/dL.

Results: Mean serum selenium was 137.1 microg/L. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] for diabetes comparing the highest quartile of serum selenium (> or = 147 microg/L) with the lowest (< 124 microg/L) was 7.64 (3.34-17.46). The corresponding average differences (95% CI) in fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were 9.5 mg/dL (3.4-15.6 mg/dL) and 0.30% (0.14-0.46%), respectively. In spline regression models, the prevalence of diabetes as well as glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels increased with increasing selenium concentrations up to 160 microg/L.

Conclusions: In U.S. adults, high serum selenium concentrations were associated with higher prevalence of diabetes and higher fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Given high selenium intake in the U.S. population, further research is needed to determine the role of excess selenium levels in the development or the progression of diabetes.

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Adjusted ORs (curves) and 95% CIs (gray shading) for diabetes (A) and adjusted differences (and 95% CI) in fasting glucose (B) and glycosylated hemoglobin (C) by serum selenium concentration. Serum selenium was modeled as restricted quadratic splines with nodes at the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentiles. The multivariable linear regression models were adjusted for sex, age, race, education, BMI, smoking, cotinine, postmenopausal status, and use of vitamin and mineral supplements (model 3). The odds for diabetes and the values of the continuous variables at the 20th percentile (122 μg/L) of the serum selenium distribution were used as reference. The histogram shows the distribution of selenium concentrations in the study population.
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f1-ehp-117-1409: Adjusted ORs (curves) and 95% CIs (gray shading) for diabetes (A) and adjusted differences (and 95% CI) in fasting glucose (B) and glycosylated hemoglobin (C) by serum selenium concentration. Serum selenium was modeled as restricted quadratic splines with nodes at the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentiles. The multivariable linear regression models were adjusted for sex, age, race, education, BMI, smoking, cotinine, postmenopausal status, and use of vitamin and mineral supplements (model 3). The odds for diabetes and the values of the continuous variables at the 20th percentile (122 μg/L) of the serum selenium distribution were used as reference. The histogram shows the distribution of selenium concentrations in the study population.

Mentions: Mean serum selenium concentrations were higher in participants with diabetes compared with those without it (143.7 vs. 136.4 μg/L, p = 0.001). The multivariable adjusted OR [95% confidence interval (CI)] for diabetes comparing the highest selenium quartile (≥ 147 μg/L) with the lowest (< 124 μg/L) was 7.64 (95% CI, 3.34–17.46) (Table 3, model 3). In spline regression models, the prevalence of diabetes increased with increasing selenium concentrations up to 160 μg/L (Figure 1, left). Adjusted ORs for diabetes comparing the 80th percentile (150 μg/L) with the 20th (122 μg/L) percentile of the selenium distribution showed consistent findings across clinically relevant subgroups (Figure 2).


Serum selenium concentrations and diabetes in U.S. adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004.

Laclaustra M, Navas-Acien A, Stranges S, Ordovas JM, Guallar E - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Adjusted ORs (curves) and 95% CIs (gray shading) for diabetes (A) and adjusted differences (and 95% CI) in fasting glucose (B) and glycosylated hemoglobin (C) by serum selenium concentration. Serum selenium was modeled as restricted quadratic splines with nodes at the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentiles. The multivariable linear regression models were adjusted for sex, age, race, education, BMI, smoking, cotinine, postmenopausal status, and use of vitamin and mineral supplements (model 3). The odds for diabetes and the values of the continuous variables at the 20th percentile (122 μg/L) of the serum selenium distribution were used as reference. The histogram shows the distribution of selenium concentrations in the study population.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2737018&req=5

f1-ehp-117-1409: Adjusted ORs (curves) and 95% CIs (gray shading) for diabetes (A) and adjusted differences (and 95% CI) in fasting glucose (B) and glycosylated hemoglobin (C) by serum selenium concentration. Serum selenium was modeled as restricted quadratic splines with nodes at the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentiles. The multivariable linear regression models were adjusted for sex, age, race, education, BMI, smoking, cotinine, postmenopausal status, and use of vitamin and mineral supplements (model 3). The odds for diabetes and the values of the continuous variables at the 20th percentile (122 μg/L) of the serum selenium distribution were used as reference. The histogram shows the distribution of selenium concentrations in the study population.
Mentions: Mean serum selenium concentrations were higher in participants with diabetes compared with those without it (143.7 vs. 136.4 μg/L, p = 0.001). The multivariable adjusted OR [95% confidence interval (CI)] for diabetes comparing the highest selenium quartile (≥ 147 μg/L) with the lowest (< 124 μg/L) was 7.64 (95% CI, 3.34–17.46) (Table 3, model 3). In spline regression models, the prevalence of diabetes increased with increasing selenium concentrations up to 160 μg/L (Figure 1, left). Adjusted ORs for diabetes comparing the 80th percentile (150 μg/L) with the 20th (122 μg/L) percentile of the selenium distribution showed consistent findings across clinically relevant subgroups (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We used a cross-sectional analysis of 917 adults > or = 40 years of age who had a fasting morning blood sample in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004.The corresponding average differences (95% CI) in fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were 9.5 mg/dL (3.4-15.6 mg/dL) and 0.30% (0.14-0.46%), respectively.In spline regression models, the prevalence of diabetes as well as glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels increased with increasing selenium concentrations up to 160 microg/L.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Increasing evidence suggests that high selenium levels are associated with diabetes and other cardiometabolic risk factors.

Objectives: We evaluated the association of serum selenium concentrations with fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, and diabetes in the most recently available representative sample of the U.S. population.

Methods: We used a cross-sectional analysis of 917 adults > or = 40 years of age who had a fasting morning blood sample in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. We evaluated the association of serum selenium, measured by inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry, and diabetes, defined as a self-report of current use of hypoglycemic agents or insulin or as fasting plasma glucose > or = 126 mg/dL.

Results: Mean serum selenium was 137.1 microg/L. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] for diabetes comparing the highest quartile of serum selenium (> or = 147 microg/L) with the lowest (< 124 microg/L) was 7.64 (3.34-17.46). The corresponding average differences (95% CI) in fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were 9.5 mg/dL (3.4-15.6 mg/dL) and 0.30% (0.14-0.46%), respectively. In spline regression models, the prevalence of diabetes as well as glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels increased with increasing selenium concentrations up to 160 microg/L.

Conclusions: In U.S. adults, high serum selenium concentrations were associated with higher prevalence of diabetes and higher fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Given high selenium intake in the U.S. population, further research is needed to determine the role of excess selenium levels in the development or the progression of diabetes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus