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Anticomplement therapy.

Kulkarni PA, Afshar-Kharghan V - Biologics (2008)

Bottom Line: The complement system is an important part of innate immunity; however, as with other parts of the immune system, the complement system can become pathologically activated and create or worsen disease.Anticomplement reagents have been studied for several years, but only recently have they emerged as a viable therapeutic tool.Specifically, we will discuss the role of anticomplement therapy in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, glomerulonephritis, and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and coronary revascularization procedures such as percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA;

ABSTRACT
The complement system is an important part of innate immunity; however, as with other parts of the immune system, the complement system can become pathologically activated and create or worsen disease. Anticomplement reagents have been studied for several years, but only recently have they emerged as a viable therapeutic tool. Here, we describe the role of the complement system in a wide array of diseases, as well as the use of anticomplement therapy as treatment for these diseases in animal models and in human clinical trials. Specifically, we will discuss the role of anticomplement therapy in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, glomerulonephritis, and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and coronary revascularization procedures such as percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The complement system and its effectors.
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f2-btt-2-671: The complement system and its effectors.

Mentions: The complement system comprises more than 30 plasma proteins, most of which are synthesized by the liver. The complement system acts through three major pathways, the classical pathway, activated by antigen-antibody complexes; the alternative pathway, activated spontaneously by attachment of C3b to a particular surface; and the lectin pathway, activated by the binding of mannan-binding lectins to carbohydrate ligands on the surface of pathogens (Figure 1) (Janeway et al 1999; Qin and Gao 2006; Cummings et al 2007; Oksjoki et al 2007). The central convergence point of all three pathways is the formation of a C3 convertase on the surface of a particular cell. With the formation of a functioning C3 convertase, complement is able to carry out its effector functions (Figure 2).


Anticomplement therapy.

Kulkarni PA, Afshar-Kharghan V - Biologics (2008)

The complement system and its effectors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2727911&req=5

f2-btt-2-671: The complement system and its effectors.
Mentions: The complement system comprises more than 30 plasma proteins, most of which are synthesized by the liver. The complement system acts through three major pathways, the classical pathway, activated by antigen-antibody complexes; the alternative pathway, activated spontaneously by attachment of C3b to a particular surface; and the lectin pathway, activated by the binding of mannan-binding lectins to carbohydrate ligands on the surface of pathogens (Figure 1) (Janeway et al 1999; Qin and Gao 2006; Cummings et al 2007; Oksjoki et al 2007). The central convergence point of all three pathways is the formation of a C3 convertase on the surface of a particular cell. With the formation of a functioning C3 convertase, complement is able to carry out its effector functions (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The complement system is an important part of innate immunity; however, as with other parts of the immune system, the complement system can become pathologically activated and create or worsen disease.Anticomplement reagents have been studied for several years, but only recently have they emerged as a viable therapeutic tool.Specifically, we will discuss the role of anticomplement therapy in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, glomerulonephritis, and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and coronary revascularization procedures such as percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA;

ABSTRACT
The complement system is an important part of innate immunity; however, as with other parts of the immune system, the complement system can become pathologically activated and create or worsen disease. Anticomplement reagents have been studied for several years, but only recently have they emerged as a viable therapeutic tool. Here, we describe the role of the complement system in a wide array of diseases, as well as the use of anticomplement therapy as treatment for these diseases in animal models and in human clinical trials. Specifically, we will discuss the role of anticomplement therapy in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, glomerulonephritis, and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and coronary revascularization procedures such as percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus