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Testing for the dual-route cascade reading model in the brain: an fMRI effective connectivity account of an efficient reading style.

Levy J, Pernet C, Treserras S, Boulanouar K, Aubry F, Démonet JF, Celsis P - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Functionality of regions together with neural network dissociations between words and pseudowords corroborate the existing neuroanatomical view on the DRC and provide a novel outlook on the sub-regions involved.In a similar vein, congruent (or incongruent) reliance of pathways, that is reliance on the word (or pseudoword) pathway during word reading and on the pseudoword (or word) pathway during pseudoword reading predicted good (or poor) reading performance as assessed by out-of-magnet reading tests.Finally, inter-individual analysis unraveled an efficient reading style mirroring pathway reliance as a function of the fingerprint of the stimulus to be read, suggesting an optimal pattern of cerebral information trafficking which leads to high reading performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Imagerie Cérébrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, CHU Purpan, Toulouse, France. yoni.levy@fcdonders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Neuropsychological data about the forms of acquired reading impairment provide a strong basis for the theoretical framework of the dual-route cascade (DRC) model which is predictive of reading performance. However, lesions are often extensive and heterogeneous, thus making it difficult to establish precise functional anatomical correlates. Here, we provide a connective neural account in the aim of accommodating the main principles of the DRC framework and to make predictions on reading skill. We located prominent reading areas using fMRI and applied structural equation modeling to pinpoint distinct neural pathways. Functionality of regions together with neural network dissociations between words and pseudowords corroborate the existing neuroanatomical view on the DRC and provide a novel outlook on the sub-regions involved. In a similar vein, congruent (or incongruent) reliance of pathways, that is reliance on the word (or pseudoword) pathway during word reading and on the pseudoword (or word) pathway during pseudoword reading predicted good (or poor) reading performance as assessed by out-of-magnet reading tests. Finally, inter-individual analysis unraveled an efficient reading style mirroring pathway reliance as a function of the fingerprint of the stimulus to be read, suggesting an optimal pattern of cerebral information trafficking which leads to high reading performance.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlations pathway coefficient/reading performance.Significant (FDR corrected or uncorrected) Spearman positive (full arrows) or negative (hashed arrows) correlation coefficients between off-line reading tests (WRT, PWRT, CTL) and effective connectivity values of on-line word (blue) and pseudoword (red) reading. WRT, Word reading Response Time test; PWRT, Pseudoword reading Response Time test; CTL, speed and precision index used in the “Alouette-R” test. L-MOG, left middle occipital gyrus; LOT, left occipito-temporal junction; LP, left parietal cortex; L-IFG, left inferior frontal gyrus.
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pone-0006675-g002: Correlations pathway coefficient/reading performance.Significant (FDR corrected or uncorrected) Spearman positive (full arrows) or negative (hashed arrows) correlation coefficients between off-line reading tests (WRT, PWRT, CTL) and effective connectivity values of on-line word (blue) and pseudoword (red) reading. WRT, Word reading Response Time test; PWRT, Pseudoword reading Response Time test; CTL, speed and precision index used in the “Alouette-R” test. L-MOG, left middle occipital gyrus; LOT, left occipito-temporal junction; LP, left parietal cortex; L-IFG, left inferior frontal gyrus.

Mentions: Testing for the correlations between path coefficients and reading performances, we observed that connectivity coefficients associated with pseudoword reading appraised during (on-line) word reading, negatively correlated with the performance on the WRT (r = −0.70, corrected for false discovery rate p = 0.002 for MOG→LOT and r = −0.56, corrected p = 0.015 for LOT→LP) and on the PWRT (r = −0.50, corrected p = 0.029 for MOG→LOT and r = −0.60, corrected p = 0.009 for LOT→LP) collected out of the scanner (Figure 2, blue hashed arrows). This shows that participants relying on the (posterior) pseudoword pathway (MOG→LOT, LOT→LP) during word reading had poorer performance in word and pseudoword reading. Conversely, connectivity coefficients of the word pathway (MOG→LP) measured during pseudoword reading, negatively correlated with the performance on the PWRT (r = −0.52, uncorrected p = 0.03) but not the WRT (r = −0.22, p = 0.22 - Figure 2, red hashed arrows). Overall, the findings allege that reliance on a neural pathway incongruent with the stimulus to be read predicts poorer reading performance as reflected by these tests.


Testing for the dual-route cascade reading model in the brain: an fMRI effective connectivity account of an efficient reading style.

Levy J, Pernet C, Treserras S, Boulanouar K, Aubry F, Démonet JF, Celsis P - PLoS ONE (2009)

Correlations pathway coefficient/reading performance.Significant (FDR corrected or uncorrected) Spearman positive (full arrows) or negative (hashed arrows) correlation coefficients between off-line reading tests (WRT, PWRT, CTL) and effective connectivity values of on-line word (blue) and pseudoword (red) reading. WRT, Word reading Response Time test; PWRT, Pseudoword reading Response Time test; CTL, speed and precision index used in the “Alouette-R” test. L-MOG, left middle occipital gyrus; LOT, left occipito-temporal junction; LP, left parietal cortex; L-IFG, left inferior frontal gyrus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2724737&req=5

pone-0006675-g002: Correlations pathway coefficient/reading performance.Significant (FDR corrected or uncorrected) Spearman positive (full arrows) or negative (hashed arrows) correlation coefficients between off-line reading tests (WRT, PWRT, CTL) and effective connectivity values of on-line word (blue) and pseudoword (red) reading. WRT, Word reading Response Time test; PWRT, Pseudoword reading Response Time test; CTL, speed and precision index used in the “Alouette-R” test. L-MOG, left middle occipital gyrus; LOT, left occipito-temporal junction; LP, left parietal cortex; L-IFG, left inferior frontal gyrus.
Mentions: Testing for the correlations between path coefficients and reading performances, we observed that connectivity coefficients associated with pseudoword reading appraised during (on-line) word reading, negatively correlated with the performance on the WRT (r = −0.70, corrected for false discovery rate p = 0.002 for MOG→LOT and r = −0.56, corrected p = 0.015 for LOT→LP) and on the PWRT (r = −0.50, corrected p = 0.029 for MOG→LOT and r = −0.60, corrected p = 0.009 for LOT→LP) collected out of the scanner (Figure 2, blue hashed arrows). This shows that participants relying on the (posterior) pseudoword pathway (MOG→LOT, LOT→LP) during word reading had poorer performance in word and pseudoword reading. Conversely, connectivity coefficients of the word pathway (MOG→LP) measured during pseudoword reading, negatively correlated with the performance on the PWRT (r = −0.52, uncorrected p = 0.03) but not the WRT (r = −0.22, p = 0.22 - Figure 2, red hashed arrows). Overall, the findings allege that reliance on a neural pathway incongruent with the stimulus to be read predicts poorer reading performance as reflected by these tests.

Bottom Line: Functionality of regions together with neural network dissociations between words and pseudowords corroborate the existing neuroanatomical view on the DRC and provide a novel outlook on the sub-regions involved.In a similar vein, congruent (or incongruent) reliance of pathways, that is reliance on the word (or pseudoword) pathway during word reading and on the pseudoword (or word) pathway during pseudoword reading predicted good (or poor) reading performance as assessed by out-of-magnet reading tests.Finally, inter-individual analysis unraveled an efficient reading style mirroring pathway reliance as a function of the fingerprint of the stimulus to be read, suggesting an optimal pattern of cerebral information trafficking which leads to high reading performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Imagerie Cérébrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, CHU Purpan, Toulouse, France. yoni.levy@fcdonders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Neuropsychological data about the forms of acquired reading impairment provide a strong basis for the theoretical framework of the dual-route cascade (DRC) model which is predictive of reading performance. However, lesions are often extensive and heterogeneous, thus making it difficult to establish precise functional anatomical correlates. Here, we provide a connective neural account in the aim of accommodating the main principles of the DRC framework and to make predictions on reading skill. We located prominent reading areas using fMRI and applied structural equation modeling to pinpoint distinct neural pathways. Functionality of regions together with neural network dissociations between words and pseudowords corroborate the existing neuroanatomical view on the DRC and provide a novel outlook on the sub-regions involved. In a similar vein, congruent (or incongruent) reliance of pathways, that is reliance on the word (or pseudoword) pathway during word reading and on the pseudoword (or word) pathway during pseudoword reading predicted good (or poor) reading performance as assessed by out-of-magnet reading tests. Finally, inter-individual analysis unraveled an efficient reading style mirroring pathway reliance as a function of the fingerprint of the stimulus to be read, suggesting an optimal pattern of cerebral information trafficking which leads to high reading performance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus