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Salt stress-induced alterations in the root proteome of barley genotypes with contrasting response towards salinity.

Witzel K, Weidner A, Surabhi GK, Börner A, Mock HP - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Bottom Line: Multivariate analysis of the resulting protein patterns revealed cultivar-specific and salt stress-responsive protein expression.Hierarchical clustering was applied to detect similar protein expression patterns.This study emphasizes the role of proteins involved in ROS detoxification during salinity stress, and identified potential candidates for increasing salt tolerance in barley.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Corrensstrasse 3, D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In addition to drought and extreme temperatures, soil salinity represents a growing threat to crop productivity. Among the cereal crops, barley is considered as notably salt tolerant, and cultivars show considerable variation for tolerance towards salinity stress. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying salt stress tolerance and to utilize the natural genetic variation of barley accessions, a series of hydroponics-based salinity stress experiments was conducted using two genetic mapping parents, cvs Steptoe and Morex, which display contrasting levels of salinity tolerance. The proteome of roots from both genotypes was investigated as displayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and comparisons were made between plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions. Multivariate analysis of the resulting protein patterns revealed cultivar-specific and salt stress-responsive protein expression. Mass spectrometry-based identification was successful for 26 out of 39 selected protein spots. Hierarchical clustering was applied to detect similar protein expression patterns. Among those, two proteins involved in the glutathione-based detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were more abundant in the tolerant genotype, while proteins involved in iron uptake were expressed at a higher level in the sensitive one. This study emphasizes the role of proteins involved in ROS detoxification during salinity stress, and identified potential candidates for increasing salt tolerance in barley.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Coomassie-stained 2-D gels from root samples of cvs Morex (left) and Steptoe (right) show the position of the spots listed in Table 1. The spot is indicated in the genotype where its expression was highest.
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fig4: Coomassie-stained 2-D gels from root samples of cvs Morex (left) and Steptoe (right) show the position of the spots listed in Table 1. The spot is indicated in the genotype where its expression was highest.

Mentions: Protein spots detected as differentially expressed were excised manually from 2-D gels for tryptic digest and subjected to mass spectrometry. In order to verify their identity, protein spots were analysed from all genotypes, treatments, and two biological experiments. When the identification could not be confirmed under all conditions or failed completely due to the limited number of entries for barley in protein or EST databases, the respective protein spot was rejected from the data set. Hence, mass spectrometry analysis allowed the identity of 26 out of the 39 differentially expressed proteins. The gel migration points of these are shown in Fig. 4 and the results of the comparative proteome analysis are presented in Table 1. Detailed information relating to peptide mass fingerprinting and de novo sequencing data are provided in Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online.


Salt stress-induced alterations in the root proteome of barley genotypes with contrasting response towards salinity.

Witzel K, Weidner A, Surabhi GK, Börner A, Mock HP - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Coomassie-stained 2-D gels from root samples of cvs Morex (left) and Steptoe (right) show the position of the spots listed in Table 1. The spot is indicated in the genotype where its expression was highest.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2724703&req=5

fig4: Coomassie-stained 2-D gels from root samples of cvs Morex (left) and Steptoe (right) show the position of the spots listed in Table 1. The spot is indicated in the genotype where its expression was highest.
Mentions: Protein spots detected as differentially expressed were excised manually from 2-D gels for tryptic digest and subjected to mass spectrometry. In order to verify their identity, protein spots were analysed from all genotypes, treatments, and two biological experiments. When the identification could not be confirmed under all conditions or failed completely due to the limited number of entries for barley in protein or EST databases, the respective protein spot was rejected from the data set. Hence, mass spectrometry analysis allowed the identity of 26 out of the 39 differentially expressed proteins. The gel migration points of these are shown in Fig. 4 and the results of the comparative proteome analysis are presented in Table 1. Detailed information relating to peptide mass fingerprinting and de novo sequencing data are provided in Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online.

Bottom Line: Multivariate analysis of the resulting protein patterns revealed cultivar-specific and salt stress-responsive protein expression.Hierarchical clustering was applied to detect similar protein expression patterns.This study emphasizes the role of proteins involved in ROS detoxification during salinity stress, and identified potential candidates for increasing salt tolerance in barley.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Corrensstrasse 3, D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In addition to drought and extreme temperatures, soil salinity represents a growing threat to crop productivity. Among the cereal crops, barley is considered as notably salt tolerant, and cultivars show considerable variation for tolerance towards salinity stress. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying salt stress tolerance and to utilize the natural genetic variation of barley accessions, a series of hydroponics-based salinity stress experiments was conducted using two genetic mapping parents, cvs Steptoe and Morex, which display contrasting levels of salinity tolerance. The proteome of roots from both genotypes was investigated as displayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and comparisons were made between plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions. Multivariate analysis of the resulting protein patterns revealed cultivar-specific and salt stress-responsive protein expression. Mass spectrometry-based identification was successful for 26 out of 39 selected protein spots. Hierarchical clustering was applied to detect similar protein expression patterns. Among those, two proteins involved in the glutathione-based detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were more abundant in the tolerant genotype, while proteins involved in iron uptake were expressed at a higher level in the sensitive one. This study emphasizes the role of proteins involved in ROS detoxification during salinity stress, and identified potential candidates for increasing salt tolerance in barley.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus