Limits...
Incidence of first primary central nervous system tumors in California, 2001-2005.

Brown M, Schrot R, Bauer K, Letendre D - J. Neurooncol. (2009)

Bottom Line: Hispanics, those with the lowest socioeconomic status, and those who lived in rural California were found to be significantly younger at diagnosis.This study is the first in the US to compare malignant to benign PCNST using a population-based data source.It illustrates the importance of PCNST surveillance in California and in diverse communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Institute/California Department of Public Health, Chronic Disease Surveillance and Research Branch, 1825 Bell Street, Suite 102, Sacramento, CA 95825, USA. MBrown@ccr.ca.gov

ABSTRACT
We examined the incidence of first primary central nervous system tumors (PCNST) in California from 2001-2005. This study period represents the first five years of data collection of benign PCNST by the California Cancer Registry. California's age-adjusted incidence rates (AAIR) for malignant and benign PCNST (5.5 and 8.5 per 100,000, respectively). Malignant PCNST were highest among non-Hispanic white males (7.8 per 100,000). Benign PCNST were highest among African American females (10.5 per 100,000). Hispanics, those with the lowest socioeconomic status, and those who lived in rural California were found to be significantly younger at diagnosis. Glioblastoma was the most frequent malignant histology, while meningioma had the highest incidence among benign histologies (2.6 and 4.5 per 100,000, respectively). This study is the first in the US to compare malignant to benign PCNST using a population-based data source. It illustrates the importance of PCNST surveillance in California and in diverse communities.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific incidence rates (ASIR) of first primary benign and malignant brain and other nervous system tumors by sex, California, 2001–2005
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2724635&req=5

Fig1: Age-specific incidence rates (ASIR) of first primary benign and malignant brain and other nervous system tumors by sex, California, 2001–2005

Mentions: Age-specific incidence of malignant tumors was lowest, for both males and females, in their early 20s. The ASIR for males was higher than the ASIR for females, with the gap increasing between ages 40 and 79. Incidence of malignant tumors peaked for both males and females in their late 70s and decreased thereafter. In contrast to malignant tumors, benign tumors were lowest in childhood and adolescence and increased with increasing age. ASIRs for benign tumors were consistently higher among females for all age groups except ages 10–14 (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Incidence of first primary central nervous system tumors in California, 2001-2005.

Brown M, Schrot R, Bauer K, Letendre D - J. Neurooncol. (2009)

Age-specific incidence rates (ASIR) of first primary benign and malignant brain and other nervous system tumors by sex, California, 2001–2005
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2724635&req=5

Fig1: Age-specific incidence rates (ASIR) of first primary benign and malignant brain and other nervous system tumors by sex, California, 2001–2005
Mentions: Age-specific incidence of malignant tumors was lowest, for both males and females, in their early 20s. The ASIR for males was higher than the ASIR for females, with the gap increasing between ages 40 and 79. Incidence of malignant tumors peaked for both males and females in their late 70s and decreased thereafter. In contrast to malignant tumors, benign tumors were lowest in childhood and adolescence and increased with increasing age. ASIRs for benign tumors were consistently higher among females for all age groups except ages 10–14 (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Hispanics, those with the lowest socioeconomic status, and those who lived in rural California were found to be significantly younger at diagnosis.This study is the first in the US to compare malignant to benign PCNST using a population-based data source.It illustrates the importance of PCNST surveillance in California and in diverse communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Institute/California Department of Public Health, Chronic Disease Surveillance and Research Branch, 1825 Bell Street, Suite 102, Sacramento, CA 95825, USA. MBrown@ccr.ca.gov

ABSTRACT
We examined the incidence of first primary central nervous system tumors (PCNST) in California from 2001-2005. This study period represents the first five years of data collection of benign PCNST by the California Cancer Registry. California's age-adjusted incidence rates (AAIR) for malignant and benign PCNST (5.5 and 8.5 per 100,000, respectively). Malignant PCNST were highest among non-Hispanic white males (7.8 per 100,000). Benign PCNST were highest among African American females (10.5 per 100,000). Hispanics, those with the lowest socioeconomic status, and those who lived in rural California were found to be significantly younger at diagnosis. Glioblastoma was the most frequent malignant histology, while meningioma had the highest incidence among benign histologies (2.6 and 4.5 per 100,000, respectively). This study is the first in the US to compare malignant to benign PCNST using a population-based data source. It illustrates the importance of PCNST surveillance in California and in diverse communities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus