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Development of physical and mental health summary scores from the patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) global items.

Hays RD, Bjorner JB, Revicki DA, Spritzer KL, Cella D - Qual Life Res (2009)

Bottom Line: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a two-factor model.Two dimensions representing physical and mental health underlie the global health items in PROMIS.These global health scales can be used to efficiently summarize physical and mental health in patient-reported outcome studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. hays@rand.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The use of global health items permits an efficient way of gathering general perceptions of health. These items provide useful summary information about health and are predictive of health care utilization and subsequent mortality.

Methods: Analyses of 10 self-reported global health items obtained from an internet survey as part of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) project. We derived summary scores from the global health items. We estimated the associations of the summary scores with the EQ-5D index score and the PROMIS physical function, pain, fatigue, emotional distress, and social health domain scores.

Results: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a two-factor model. Global physical health (GPH; 4 items on overall physical health, physical function, pain, and fatigue) and global mental health (GMH; 4 items on quality of life, mental health, satisfaction with social activities, and emotional problems) scales were created. The scales had internal consistency reliability coefficients of 0.81 and 0.86, respectively. GPH correlated more strongly with the EQ-5D than did GMH (r = 0.76 vs. 0.59). GPH correlated most strongly with pain impact (r = -0.75) whereas GMH correlated most strongly with depressive symptoms (r = -0.71).

Conclusions: Two dimensions representing physical and mental health underlie the global health items in PROMIS. These global health scales can be used to efficiently summarize physical and mental health in patient-reported outcome studies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

PROMIS data collection (n = 21,133)
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Fig1: PROMIS data collection (n = 21,133)

Mentions: Because of the number of item banks being tested, we employed a complex data collection strategy. This strategy included two arms and a total sample size of 21,133 (see Fig. 1). Polimetrix recruited a total of 19,601 subjects; we recruited the remaining 1,532 subjects from the PROMIS research sites. In the full bank testing arm, we administered 2 item banks (56 item per bank) to 7,005 persons. In the second arm, we administered randomly selected 7-item blocks from each of the 14 hypothesized PROMIS sub-domains to 14,128 individuals. The PROMIS research sites and the Polimetrix sample included both community and clinical samples. The clinical samples included persons with heart disease (n = 1,156), cancer (n = 1,754), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 557), osteoarthritis (n = 918), psychiatric disorders (n = 1,193), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 1,214), spinal cord injury (n = 531), and other conditions (n = 560).Fig. 1


Development of physical and mental health summary scores from the patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) global items.

Hays RD, Bjorner JB, Revicki DA, Spritzer KL, Cella D - Qual Life Res (2009)

PROMIS data collection (n = 21,133)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2724630&req=5

Fig1: PROMIS data collection (n = 21,133)
Mentions: Because of the number of item banks being tested, we employed a complex data collection strategy. This strategy included two arms and a total sample size of 21,133 (see Fig. 1). Polimetrix recruited a total of 19,601 subjects; we recruited the remaining 1,532 subjects from the PROMIS research sites. In the full bank testing arm, we administered 2 item banks (56 item per bank) to 7,005 persons. In the second arm, we administered randomly selected 7-item blocks from each of the 14 hypothesized PROMIS sub-domains to 14,128 individuals. The PROMIS research sites and the Polimetrix sample included both community and clinical samples. The clinical samples included persons with heart disease (n = 1,156), cancer (n = 1,754), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 557), osteoarthritis (n = 918), psychiatric disorders (n = 1,193), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 1,214), spinal cord injury (n = 531), and other conditions (n = 560).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a two-factor model.Two dimensions representing physical and mental health underlie the global health items in PROMIS.These global health scales can be used to efficiently summarize physical and mental health in patient-reported outcome studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. hays@rand.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The use of global health items permits an efficient way of gathering general perceptions of health. These items provide useful summary information about health and are predictive of health care utilization and subsequent mortality.

Methods: Analyses of 10 self-reported global health items obtained from an internet survey as part of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) project. We derived summary scores from the global health items. We estimated the associations of the summary scores with the EQ-5D index score and the PROMIS physical function, pain, fatigue, emotional distress, and social health domain scores.

Results: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a two-factor model. Global physical health (GPH; 4 items on overall physical health, physical function, pain, and fatigue) and global mental health (GMH; 4 items on quality of life, mental health, satisfaction with social activities, and emotional problems) scales were created. The scales had internal consistency reliability coefficients of 0.81 and 0.86, respectively. GPH correlated more strongly with the EQ-5D than did GMH (r = 0.76 vs. 0.59). GPH correlated most strongly with pain impact (r = -0.75) whereas GMH correlated most strongly with depressive symptoms (r = -0.71).

Conclusions: Two dimensions representing physical and mental health underlie the global health items in PROMIS. These global health scales can be used to efficiently summarize physical and mental health in patient-reported outcome studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus