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Haematological effects of multimicronutrient supplementation in non-pregnant Gambian women.

Gulati R, Bailey R, Prentice AM, Brabin BJ, Owens S - Eur J Clin Nutr (2009)

Bottom Line: The objective of the study was to evaluate haematological outcomes in non-pregnant, rural Gambian women of reproductive age, receiving daily MMN supplements for 1 year.Anaemic subjects at baseline showed an increase in mean haemoglobin from 10.6 g per 100 ml to 11.8 g/l (P<0.001) after MMN supplementation.MMN supplementation should be considered as a strategy for improving the micronutrient and haematological status of non-pregnant women of reproductive age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child and Reproductive Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background/objectives: The use of multimicronutrient (MMN) supplementation to reduce the burden of anaemia in non-pregnant women of reproductive age has been little studied, particularly in Africa. The objective of the study was to evaluate haematological outcomes in non-pregnant, rural Gambian women of reproductive age, receiving daily MMN supplements for 1 year.

Subjects/methods: The study in 293 women aged from 17 to 45 years old was nested within a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial of periconceptional MMN supplementation [ISRCTN 13687662], using the United Nations International Multiple Micronutrient Preparation (UNIMMAP), received daily for 1 year or until conception. Red cell parameters and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration were measured at baseline and after 12 months in those women who did not conceive.

Results: Anaemic women (haemoglobin concentration <12 g per 100 ml) were more likely to be older and in economic deficit at baseline. Mean change in haemoglobin concentration was +0.6+/-1.4 g per 100 ml in the intervention arm and -0.2+/-1.2 g per 100 ml in the placebo arm (P<0.001). After supplementation with MMN, the relative risk of anaemia (<12 g per 100 ml) was 0.59 (0.46, 0.76) compared with placebo. Anaemic subjects at baseline showed an increase in mean haemoglobin from 10.6 g per 100 ml to 11.8 g/l (P<0.001) after MMN supplementation.

Conclusions: MMN supplementation should be considered as a strategy for improving the micronutrient and haematological status of non-pregnant women of reproductive age.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Trial Profile: subjects entering PMMST and further enrolment into the haematological sub-study
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Trial Profile: subjects entering PMMST and further enrolment into the haematological sub-study

Mentions: Of 1156 women recruited for the original trial 421 were considered to be eligible for the current study according to the criteria above. Of these 293 subjects were identified and recruited (Figure 1). Subjects who could not be traced by the field teams or who did not attend after direct invitation were not recruited (n=128). Baseline characteristics of recruited (n=293) and non-recruited (n=128) women are summarised in Table 2. Untraced women were more likely to be iparous, to have lower mean anthropometric indices and were more likely to have received formal schooling. There were no differences in haematological parameters. Baseline characteristics of the intervention and placebo groups were not different except for total white cell concentration at baseline (Table 3). The estimate of compliance did not differ between treatment groups (MMN: 0.96 ± 0.18; placebo: 0.92 ± 0.19, p=0.15). The mean time of follow up was similar in both groups (MMN: 14.1 ± 1.2 months, placebo 14.0 ± 1.2 months). Baseline predictors of anaemia, after adjustment (Table 4), included older age OR= 2.01 (1.16, 3.48) and economic deficit OR=1.98 (1.21, 3.25).


Haematological effects of multimicronutrient supplementation in non-pregnant Gambian women.

Gulati R, Bailey R, Prentice AM, Brabin BJ, Owens S - Eur J Clin Nutr (2009)

Trial Profile: subjects entering PMMST and further enrolment into the haematological sub-study
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2722583&req=5

Figure 1: Trial Profile: subjects entering PMMST and further enrolment into the haematological sub-study
Mentions: Of 1156 women recruited for the original trial 421 were considered to be eligible for the current study according to the criteria above. Of these 293 subjects were identified and recruited (Figure 1). Subjects who could not be traced by the field teams or who did not attend after direct invitation were not recruited (n=128). Baseline characteristics of recruited (n=293) and non-recruited (n=128) women are summarised in Table 2. Untraced women were more likely to be iparous, to have lower mean anthropometric indices and were more likely to have received formal schooling. There were no differences in haematological parameters. Baseline characteristics of the intervention and placebo groups were not different except for total white cell concentration at baseline (Table 3). The estimate of compliance did not differ between treatment groups (MMN: 0.96 ± 0.18; placebo: 0.92 ± 0.19, p=0.15). The mean time of follow up was similar in both groups (MMN: 14.1 ± 1.2 months, placebo 14.0 ± 1.2 months). Baseline predictors of anaemia, after adjustment (Table 4), included older age OR= 2.01 (1.16, 3.48) and economic deficit OR=1.98 (1.21, 3.25).

Bottom Line: The objective of the study was to evaluate haematological outcomes in non-pregnant, rural Gambian women of reproductive age, receiving daily MMN supplements for 1 year.Anaemic subjects at baseline showed an increase in mean haemoglobin from 10.6 g per 100 ml to 11.8 g/l (P<0.001) after MMN supplementation.MMN supplementation should be considered as a strategy for improving the micronutrient and haematological status of non-pregnant women of reproductive age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child and Reproductive Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background/objectives: The use of multimicronutrient (MMN) supplementation to reduce the burden of anaemia in non-pregnant women of reproductive age has been little studied, particularly in Africa. The objective of the study was to evaluate haematological outcomes in non-pregnant, rural Gambian women of reproductive age, receiving daily MMN supplements for 1 year.

Subjects/methods: The study in 293 women aged from 17 to 45 years old was nested within a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial of periconceptional MMN supplementation [ISRCTN 13687662], using the United Nations International Multiple Micronutrient Preparation (UNIMMAP), received daily for 1 year or until conception. Red cell parameters and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration were measured at baseline and after 12 months in those women who did not conceive.

Results: Anaemic women (haemoglobin concentration <12 g per 100 ml) were more likely to be older and in economic deficit at baseline. Mean change in haemoglobin concentration was +0.6+/-1.4 g per 100 ml in the intervention arm and -0.2+/-1.2 g per 100 ml in the placebo arm (P<0.001). After supplementation with MMN, the relative risk of anaemia (<12 g per 100 ml) was 0.59 (0.46, 0.76) compared with placebo. Anaemic subjects at baseline showed an increase in mean haemoglobin from 10.6 g per 100 ml to 11.8 g/l (P<0.001) after MMN supplementation.

Conclusions: MMN supplementation should be considered as a strategy for improving the micronutrient and haematological status of non-pregnant women of reproductive age.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus