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Evaluation of the Wound-healing Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Morinda citrifolia L. Leaf.

Nayak BS, Sandiford S, Maxwell A - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

Bottom Line: The primary indigenous use of this plant appears to be of the leaves, as a topical treatment for wound healing.On day 11, the extract-treated animals exhibited 71% reduction in the wound area when compared with controls which exhibited 57%.The granulation tissue weight and hydroxyproline content in the dead space wounds were also increased significantly in noni-treated animals compared with controls (P < 0.002).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pre clinical Sciences, Biochemistry unit, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad. shiv25@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Morinda citrifolia L. (noni) is one of the most important traditional Polynesian medicinal plants. The primary indigenous use of this plant appears to be of the leaves, as a topical treatment for wound healing. The ethanol extract of noni leaves (150 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was used to evaluate the wound-healing activity on rats, using excision and dead space wound models. Animals were randomly divided into two groups of six for each model. Test group animals in each model were treated with the ethanol extract of noni orally by mixing in drinking water and the control group animals were maintained with plain drinking water. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, time until complete epithelialization, granulation tissue weight and hydoxyproline content. On day 11, the extract-treated animals exhibited 71% reduction in the wound area when compared with controls which exhibited 57%. The granulation tissue weight and hydroxyproline content in the dead space wounds were also increased significantly in noni-treated animals compared with controls (P < 0.002). Enhanced wound contraction, decreased epithelialization time, increased hydroxyproline content and histological characteristics suggest that noni leaf extract may have therapeutic benefits in wound healing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histology of the granulation tissue obtained from the test group rats treated with noni extract (Van Gieson stain), a: macrophages, b: fibroblasts, c: collagen fibres.
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Figure 4: Histology of the granulation tissue obtained from the test group rats treated with noni extract (Van Gieson stain), a: macrophages, b: fibroblasts, c: collagen fibres.

Mentions: Histological sections of granulation tissue from extract-treated rats showed increased and well-organized bands of collagen, more fibroblasts and few inflammatory cells (Fig. 4). Granulation tissue sections obtained from control rats revealed more inflammatory cells and less collagen fibers and fibroblasts (Fig. 5).Figure 4.


Evaluation of the Wound-healing Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Morinda citrifolia L. Leaf.

Nayak BS, Sandiford S, Maxwell A - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

Histology of the granulation tissue obtained from the test group rats treated with noni extract (Van Gieson stain), a: macrophages, b: fibroblasts, c: collagen fibres.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2722214&req=5

Figure 4: Histology of the granulation tissue obtained from the test group rats treated with noni extract (Van Gieson stain), a: macrophages, b: fibroblasts, c: collagen fibres.
Mentions: Histological sections of granulation tissue from extract-treated rats showed increased and well-organized bands of collagen, more fibroblasts and few inflammatory cells (Fig. 4). Granulation tissue sections obtained from control rats revealed more inflammatory cells and less collagen fibers and fibroblasts (Fig. 5).Figure 4.

Bottom Line: The primary indigenous use of this plant appears to be of the leaves, as a topical treatment for wound healing.On day 11, the extract-treated animals exhibited 71% reduction in the wound area when compared with controls which exhibited 57%.The granulation tissue weight and hydroxyproline content in the dead space wounds were also increased significantly in noni-treated animals compared with controls (P < 0.002).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pre clinical Sciences, Biochemistry unit, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad. shiv25@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Morinda citrifolia L. (noni) is one of the most important traditional Polynesian medicinal plants. The primary indigenous use of this plant appears to be of the leaves, as a topical treatment for wound healing. The ethanol extract of noni leaves (150 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was used to evaluate the wound-healing activity on rats, using excision and dead space wound models. Animals were randomly divided into two groups of six for each model. Test group animals in each model were treated with the ethanol extract of noni orally by mixing in drinking water and the control group animals were maintained with plain drinking water. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, time until complete epithelialization, granulation tissue weight and hydoxyproline content. On day 11, the extract-treated animals exhibited 71% reduction in the wound area when compared with controls which exhibited 57%. The granulation tissue weight and hydroxyproline content in the dead space wounds were also increased significantly in noni-treated animals compared with controls (P < 0.002). Enhanced wound contraction, decreased epithelialization time, increased hydroxyproline content and histological characteristics suggest that noni leaf extract may have therapeutic benefits in wound healing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus