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How Far Can Ki-energy Reach?--A Hypothetical Mechanism for the Generation and Transmission of Ki-energy.

Ohnishi ST, Ohnishi T - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

Bottom Line: 'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects.Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm.All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Philadelphia Biomedical Research Institute, Suite 250, 100 Ross Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0227, USA. stohnishi@aol.com.

ABSTRACT
'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects. Although Ki-energy can play an important role in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as yet it is unknown how Ki-energy is generated, transmitted through air and received by another individual. We previously proposed that Ki-energy may include near-infrared radiation, and that the wavelength was between 800 and 2700 nm. Since Ki-energy is reflected by a mirror, we believe that the 'Ki-beam' has a small divergence angle. It can also be guided in a desired direction. The acrylic mirror reflection experiment suggests that the wavelength may be between 800 and 1600 nm. Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm. We have also observed that 'sensitive' practitioners responded to Ki sent from a distance of 100 m. All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength. Since these properties are characteristics of the laser radiation, we propose a quantum physics-based mechanism of 'Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation' (i.e. LASER) for the generation of Ki-energy. Volunteers responded to Ki even with a blindfold. This suggests that the skin must be detecting Ki-energy. We propose that the detector at the skin level may also have the stimulated emission mechanism, which amplifies the weak incident infrared radiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Simplified explanation for the laser emission. (A) When a photon comes into a material which has two electron levels, lower level (E1) and the excited level (E2), an electron is excited to jump up to the excitation level. (B) When that electron spontaneously returns to the lower level, a photon is emitted. This is called ‘spontaneous emission.’ (C) If a sufficiently high ‘pumping energy’ is supplied to the system, a ‘population inversion’ of electrons takes place where the number of electrons in E2 is greater than that in E1. When a photon is produced by a spontaneous emission (shown by a green arrow), it forces another electron drop to the lower level (shown by a red × symbol), and concomitantly, emit another photon which has the same wavelength and the same phase (shown by a red arrow). This is called ‘stimulated emission.’ The photon thus produced further produces another stimulated emission, and the number of photon is kept increasing as long as we have enough electrons in the excited level. (D) Two mirrors placed on opposite ends of the laser material serve as a ‘light resonator.’ Under a sufficiently strong pump light, the stimulated emission takes place. This light reflects back and forth between these mirrors so that the light becomes intensified and coherent (i.e. all light has the same phase).
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Figure 9: Simplified explanation for the laser emission. (A) When a photon comes into a material which has two electron levels, lower level (E1) and the excited level (E2), an electron is excited to jump up to the excitation level. (B) When that electron spontaneously returns to the lower level, a photon is emitted. This is called ‘spontaneous emission.’ (C) If a sufficiently high ‘pumping energy’ is supplied to the system, a ‘population inversion’ of electrons takes place where the number of electrons in E2 is greater than that in E1. When a photon is produced by a spontaneous emission (shown by a green arrow), it forces another electron drop to the lower level (shown by a red × symbol), and concomitantly, emit another photon which has the same wavelength and the same phase (shown by a red arrow). This is called ‘stimulated emission.’ The photon thus produced further produces another stimulated emission, and the number of photon is kept increasing as long as we have enough electrons in the excited level. (D) Two mirrors placed on opposite ends of the laser material serve as a ‘light resonator.’ Under a sufficiently strong pump light, the stimulated emission takes place. This light reflects back and forth between these mirrors so that the light becomes intensified and coherent (i.e. all light has the same phase).

Mentions: In order to pursue this possibility, let's quickly review the principle of laser radiation. The term ‘laser’ is the abbreviation for ‘Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation.’ Let us assume that the electrons in an appropriate material have two energy levels, the lower level (E1) and the excited level (E2), and that the difference is ΔE. If a photon with the energy given bycomes in, then, quantum physics tells us that an electron in the lower level is excited to jump up to the excited level (Fig. 9A). In this equation, h is the Planck constant and ν the frequency of the light. This electron spontaneously returns to the original lower level, concomitantly emitting a light (Fig. 9B). This is called spontaneous emission. Under normal condition, the number of electron in the excited level is less than that in the lower level. However, if we could ‘pump in’ sufficiently high energy, for example, by applying electric energy or by illuminating the material with very intense light (called a ‘pump light’), then the situation may occur where the number in the excited level becomes larger than that in the lower level. This inverted electron distribution is called ‘population inversion’ (Fig. 9C). Under this condition, when a photon is produced by a ‘spontaneous emission,’ then, the photon thus produced forces another electron to drop from the excited level to the lower level by emitting a photon. This process is called a ‘stimulated emission of radiation,’ in which the emitted light has the same frequency and the same phase as that of the incident light. The stimulated photon causes, in turn, another stimulated emission, and the light is kept being amplified. In a conventional laser, a pair of mirrors (one is a full mirror and the other, a half-mirror) are mounted on the opposite ends of the laser material. The stimulated light is reflected between these mirrors back and forth so that the light intensity is kept amplified, and the phase of the light becomes coherent (Fig. 9D). A certain percentage of the light (normally about a few percent) which comes out through the half mirror is used for the laser experiment. This is the basic principle of laser emission. [For the sake of simplicity, the explanation was somewhat oversimplified. For those who need more information, please see a text book, such as (34)].Figure 9.


How Far Can Ki-energy Reach?--A Hypothetical Mechanism for the Generation and Transmission of Ki-energy.

Ohnishi ST, Ohnishi T - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

Simplified explanation for the laser emission. (A) When a photon comes into a material which has two electron levels, lower level (E1) and the excited level (E2), an electron is excited to jump up to the excitation level. (B) When that electron spontaneously returns to the lower level, a photon is emitted. This is called ‘spontaneous emission.’ (C) If a sufficiently high ‘pumping energy’ is supplied to the system, a ‘population inversion’ of electrons takes place where the number of electrons in E2 is greater than that in E1. When a photon is produced by a spontaneous emission (shown by a green arrow), it forces another electron drop to the lower level (shown by a red × symbol), and concomitantly, emit another photon which has the same wavelength and the same phase (shown by a red arrow). This is called ‘stimulated emission.’ The photon thus produced further produces another stimulated emission, and the number of photon is kept increasing as long as we have enough electrons in the excited level. (D) Two mirrors placed on opposite ends of the laser material serve as a ‘light resonator.’ Under a sufficiently strong pump light, the stimulated emission takes place. This light reflects back and forth between these mirrors so that the light becomes intensified and coherent (i.e. all light has the same phase).
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Figure 9: Simplified explanation for the laser emission. (A) When a photon comes into a material which has two electron levels, lower level (E1) and the excited level (E2), an electron is excited to jump up to the excitation level. (B) When that electron spontaneously returns to the lower level, a photon is emitted. This is called ‘spontaneous emission.’ (C) If a sufficiently high ‘pumping energy’ is supplied to the system, a ‘population inversion’ of electrons takes place where the number of electrons in E2 is greater than that in E1. When a photon is produced by a spontaneous emission (shown by a green arrow), it forces another electron drop to the lower level (shown by a red × symbol), and concomitantly, emit another photon which has the same wavelength and the same phase (shown by a red arrow). This is called ‘stimulated emission.’ The photon thus produced further produces another stimulated emission, and the number of photon is kept increasing as long as we have enough electrons in the excited level. (D) Two mirrors placed on opposite ends of the laser material serve as a ‘light resonator.’ Under a sufficiently strong pump light, the stimulated emission takes place. This light reflects back and forth between these mirrors so that the light becomes intensified and coherent (i.e. all light has the same phase).
Mentions: In order to pursue this possibility, let's quickly review the principle of laser radiation. The term ‘laser’ is the abbreviation for ‘Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation.’ Let us assume that the electrons in an appropriate material have two energy levels, the lower level (E1) and the excited level (E2), and that the difference is ΔE. If a photon with the energy given bycomes in, then, quantum physics tells us that an electron in the lower level is excited to jump up to the excited level (Fig. 9A). In this equation, h is the Planck constant and ν the frequency of the light. This electron spontaneously returns to the original lower level, concomitantly emitting a light (Fig. 9B). This is called spontaneous emission. Under normal condition, the number of electron in the excited level is less than that in the lower level. However, if we could ‘pump in’ sufficiently high energy, for example, by applying electric energy or by illuminating the material with very intense light (called a ‘pump light’), then the situation may occur where the number in the excited level becomes larger than that in the lower level. This inverted electron distribution is called ‘population inversion’ (Fig. 9C). Under this condition, when a photon is produced by a ‘spontaneous emission,’ then, the photon thus produced forces another electron to drop from the excited level to the lower level by emitting a photon. This process is called a ‘stimulated emission of radiation,’ in which the emitted light has the same frequency and the same phase as that of the incident light. The stimulated photon causes, in turn, another stimulated emission, and the light is kept being amplified. In a conventional laser, a pair of mirrors (one is a full mirror and the other, a half-mirror) are mounted on the opposite ends of the laser material. The stimulated light is reflected between these mirrors back and forth so that the light intensity is kept amplified, and the phase of the light becomes coherent (Fig. 9D). A certain percentage of the light (normally about a few percent) which comes out through the half mirror is used for the laser experiment. This is the basic principle of laser emission. [For the sake of simplicity, the explanation was somewhat oversimplified. For those who need more information, please see a text book, such as (34)].Figure 9.

Bottom Line: 'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects.Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm.All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Philadelphia Biomedical Research Institute, Suite 250, 100 Ross Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0227, USA. stohnishi@aol.com.

ABSTRACT
'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects. Although Ki-energy can play an important role in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as yet it is unknown how Ki-energy is generated, transmitted through air and received by another individual. We previously proposed that Ki-energy may include near-infrared radiation, and that the wavelength was between 800 and 2700 nm. Since Ki-energy is reflected by a mirror, we believe that the 'Ki-beam' has a small divergence angle. It can also be guided in a desired direction. The acrylic mirror reflection experiment suggests that the wavelength may be between 800 and 1600 nm. Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm. We have also observed that 'sensitive' practitioners responded to Ki sent from a distance of 100 m. All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength. Since these properties are characteristics of the laser radiation, we propose a quantum physics-based mechanism of 'Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation' (i.e. LASER) for the generation of Ki-energy. Volunteers responded to Ki even with a blindfold. This suggests that the skin must be detecting Ki-energy. We propose that the detector at the skin level may also have the stimulated emission mechanism, which amplifies the weak incident infrared radiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus