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How Far Can Ki-energy Reach?--A Hypothetical Mechanism for the Generation and Transmission of Ki-energy.

Ohnishi ST, Ohnishi T - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

Bottom Line: 'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects.Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm.All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Philadelphia Biomedical Research Institute, Suite 250, 100 Ross Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0227, USA. stohnishi@aol.com.

ABSTRACT
'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects. Although Ki-energy can play an important role in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as yet it is unknown how Ki-energy is generated, transmitted through air and received by another individual. We previously proposed that Ki-energy may include near-infrared radiation, and that the wavelength was between 800 and 2700 nm. Since Ki-energy is reflected by a mirror, we believe that the 'Ki-beam' has a small divergence angle. It can also be guided in a desired direction. The acrylic mirror reflection experiment suggests that the wavelength may be between 800 and 1600 nm. Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm. We have also observed that 'sensitive' practitioners responded to Ki sent from a distance of 100 m. All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength. Since these properties are characteristics of the laser radiation, we propose a quantum physics-based mechanism of 'Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation' (i.e. LASER) for the generation of Ki-energy. Volunteers responded to Ki even with a blindfold. This suggests that the skin must be detecting Ki-energy. We propose that the detector at the skin level may also have the stimulated emission mechanism, which amplifies the weak incident infrared radiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Photos show KO's responses toward STO's Ki in the indoor experiments. (For 2 m experiments) A1, before Ki was sent; A2, after Ki was sent. (For 20 m experiments) B1, Ki was sent; B2, after Ki was sent. (For the glass reflection experiments with KO) C1, STO sent Ki toward the mirror; C2, a glass mirror (20 × 30 cm) was fixed on the table; C3, before Ki was sent; C4, after Ki was sent to the mirror. (B) Photos show responses of the Ki-reciever (MH) and the mirror-holder (TM) to STO's Ki. A1, STO on the right side of the picture sent Ki toward an acrylic mirror (40 × 55 cm) held by TM in the middle. The Ki-receiver (MH) is standing on the left; A2, After about 1.8 s, MH lost a balance; A3, MH started running backward; B1, STO sent Ki to the mirror; B2, As long as TM held the mirror, TM did not feel anything even though MH ran backward; B3, If TM did not hold the mirror, TM fell down on the ground when STO sent Ki to TM. In this case, the Ki-receiver, MH, did not feel anything.
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Figure 5: (A) Photos show KO's responses toward STO's Ki in the indoor experiments. (For 2 m experiments) A1, before Ki was sent; A2, after Ki was sent. (For 20 m experiments) B1, Ki was sent; B2, after Ki was sent. (For the glass reflection experiments with KO) C1, STO sent Ki toward the mirror; C2, a glass mirror (20 × 30 cm) was fixed on the table; C3, before Ki was sent; C4, after Ki was sent to the mirror. (B) Photos show responses of the Ki-reciever (MH) and the mirror-holder (TM) to STO's Ki. A1, STO on the right side of the picture sent Ki toward an acrylic mirror (40 × 55 cm) held by TM in the middle. The Ki-receiver (MH) is standing on the left; A2, After about 1.8 s, MH lost a balance; A3, MH started running backward; B1, STO sent Ki to the mirror; B2, As long as TM held the mirror, TM did not feel anything even though MH ran backward; B3, If TM did not hold the mirror, TM fell down on the ground when STO sent Ki to TM. In this case, the Ki-receiver, MH, did not feel anything.

Mentions: As shown in Fig. 5A, KO was very sensitive to STO's Ki. He jumped backward and fell down when he received Ki from distances of both 2 m and 20 m (see Fig. 5A, A1, A2, B1, B2). At 20 m, the use of blindfold slightly elongated the response time from that without blindfold. However, as shown in Table 1, the difference was not statistically significant. The difference between (2 m blindfold) and (20 m blindfold) was not significantly different either. This suggests that Ki-phenomenon is not a hypnotic effect. The result also indicated that Ki-energy does not diverge much with the distance.Figure 5.


How Far Can Ki-energy Reach?--A Hypothetical Mechanism for the Generation and Transmission of Ki-energy.

Ohnishi ST, Ohnishi T - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

(A) Photos show KO's responses toward STO's Ki in the indoor experiments. (For 2 m experiments) A1, before Ki was sent; A2, after Ki was sent. (For 20 m experiments) B1, Ki was sent; B2, after Ki was sent. (For the glass reflection experiments with KO) C1, STO sent Ki toward the mirror; C2, a glass mirror (20 × 30 cm) was fixed on the table; C3, before Ki was sent; C4, after Ki was sent to the mirror. (B) Photos show responses of the Ki-reciever (MH) and the mirror-holder (TM) to STO's Ki. A1, STO on the right side of the picture sent Ki toward an acrylic mirror (40 × 55 cm) held by TM in the middle. The Ki-receiver (MH) is standing on the left; A2, After about 1.8 s, MH lost a balance; A3, MH started running backward; B1, STO sent Ki to the mirror; B2, As long as TM held the mirror, TM did not feel anything even though MH ran backward; B3, If TM did not hold the mirror, TM fell down on the ground when STO sent Ki to TM. In this case, the Ki-receiver, MH, did not feel anything.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2722212&req=5

Figure 5: (A) Photos show KO's responses toward STO's Ki in the indoor experiments. (For 2 m experiments) A1, before Ki was sent; A2, after Ki was sent. (For 20 m experiments) B1, Ki was sent; B2, after Ki was sent. (For the glass reflection experiments with KO) C1, STO sent Ki toward the mirror; C2, a glass mirror (20 × 30 cm) was fixed on the table; C3, before Ki was sent; C4, after Ki was sent to the mirror. (B) Photos show responses of the Ki-reciever (MH) and the mirror-holder (TM) to STO's Ki. A1, STO on the right side of the picture sent Ki toward an acrylic mirror (40 × 55 cm) held by TM in the middle. The Ki-receiver (MH) is standing on the left; A2, After about 1.8 s, MH lost a balance; A3, MH started running backward; B1, STO sent Ki to the mirror; B2, As long as TM held the mirror, TM did not feel anything even though MH ran backward; B3, If TM did not hold the mirror, TM fell down on the ground when STO sent Ki to TM. In this case, the Ki-receiver, MH, did not feel anything.
Mentions: As shown in Fig. 5A, KO was very sensitive to STO's Ki. He jumped backward and fell down when he received Ki from distances of both 2 m and 20 m (see Fig. 5A, A1, A2, B1, B2). At 20 m, the use of blindfold slightly elongated the response time from that without blindfold. However, as shown in Table 1, the difference was not statistically significant. The difference between (2 m blindfold) and (20 m blindfold) was not significantly different either. This suggests that Ki-phenomenon is not a hypnotic effect. The result also indicated that Ki-energy does not diverge much with the distance.Figure 5.

Bottom Line: 'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects.Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm.All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Philadelphia Biomedical Research Institute, Suite 250, 100 Ross Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0227, USA. stohnishi@aol.com.

ABSTRACT
'Ki-energy', which can be enhanced through the practice of Nishino Breathing Method, was reported to have beneficial health effects. Although Ki-energy can play an important role in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as yet it is unknown how Ki-energy is generated, transmitted through air and received by another individual. We previously proposed that Ki-energy may include near-infrared radiation, and that the wavelength was between 800 and 2700 nm. Since Ki-energy is reflected by a mirror, we believe that the 'Ki-beam' has a small divergence angle. It can also be guided in a desired direction. The acrylic mirror reflection experiment suggests that the wavelength may be between 800 and 1600 nm. Using a linear variable interference filter, we found that Ki-energy may have a peak around 1000 nm. We have also observed that 'sensitive' practitioners responded to Ki sent from a distance of 100 m. All of these results suggest that (i) Ki-energy can be guided as a directional 'beam' with a small divergence angle; (ii) the beam can be reflected by a mirror and (iii) Ki-energy may have a specific wavelength. Since these properties are characteristics of the laser radiation, we propose a quantum physics-based mechanism of 'Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation' (i.e. LASER) for the generation of Ki-energy. Volunteers responded to Ki even with a blindfold. This suggests that the skin must be detecting Ki-energy. We propose that the detector at the skin level may also have the stimulated emission mechanism, which amplifies the weak incident infrared radiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus