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Evaluating Complementary Therapies for Canine Osteoarthritis Part I: Green-lipped Mussel (Perna canaliculus).

Hielm-Björkman A, Tulamo RM, Salonen H, Raekallio M - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

Bottom Line: For the same three, the odds ratio and their confidence interval were over one.The extent of improvement was significantly different between the GLM and the control in veterinary-assessed mobility (P = 0.012) and pain VAS (P = 0.004).In conclusion, GLM alleviated chronic orthopedic pain in dogs although it was not as effective as carprofen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, University of Helsinki, PO Box 57, FI-00014, Finland. anna.hielm-bjorkman@helsinki.fi.

ABSTRACT
A green-lipped mussel (GLM) preparation was evaluated in a randomized, double-controlled and double-blinded clinical trial. It was hypothesized that the treatment effect would be less than that of the positive control (carprofen) but more than that of the negative control (placebo). Forty-five dogs with chronic pain and a radiographic diagnosis of osteoarthritis that were randomly allocated into one of three groups completed the study. All dogs were fed the test products or placebo for 8 weeks. The dogs were evaluated four times, at 4-week intervals. Six different variables were assessed: veterinary-assessed mobility index, two force plate variables, owner-evaluated chronic pain index and pain as well as locomotion visual analogue scales (VASs). Intake of extra carprofen was also evaluated. A chi-squared and a Mann-Whitney test were used to determine significance between groups. When changed to dichotomous variables, there were more dogs in the GLM than in the placebo group that improved, according to veterinary-assessed mobility, owner-evaluated chronic pain index and pain VAS (P = 0.031, P = 0.025, P = 0.011, respectively). For the same three, the odds ratio and their confidence interval were over one. The extent of improvement was significantly different between the GLM and the control in veterinary-assessed mobility (P = 0.012) and pain VAS (P = 0.004). In conclusion, GLM alleviated chronic orthopedic pain in dogs although it was not as effective as carprofen. As no side-effects were detected, GLM may be beneficial in dogs e.g. when non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cannot be used.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

At the end of the treatment period (W8), there was 4/15 dogs in the placebo group given extra carprofen 3–7 days/week (n = number of dogs).
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Figure 1: At the end of the treatment period (W8), there was 4/15 dogs in the placebo group given extra carprofen 3–7 days/week (n = number of dogs).

Mentions: At W−4, before the owners were requested to stop all medication, 14% of the carprofen group, 13% of the GLM group and 8% of the placebo group were given NSAIDs once a week or more. At W8, (Fig. 1) 0, 7 and 27% of the respective groups were given additional carprofen once a week or more. At follow-up (W12), the respective numbers were 33, 14 and 29%. The differences between both GLM and carprofen compared to the placebo group at time W8 were significant (P = 0.021 and P = 0.008, respectively).Figure 1.


Evaluating Complementary Therapies for Canine Osteoarthritis Part I: Green-lipped Mussel (Perna canaliculus).

Hielm-Björkman A, Tulamo RM, Salonen H, Raekallio M - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2007)

At the end of the treatment period (W8), there was 4/15 dogs in the placebo group given extra carprofen 3–7 days/week (n = number of dogs).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2722199&req=5

Figure 1: At the end of the treatment period (W8), there was 4/15 dogs in the placebo group given extra carprofen 3–7 days/week (n = number of dogs).
Mentions: At W−4, before the owners were requested to stop all medication, 14% of the carprofen group, 13% of the GLM group and 8% of the placebo group were given NSAIDs once a week or more. At W8, (Fig. 1) 0, 7 and 27% of the respective groups were given additional carprofen once a week or more. At follow-up (W12), the respective numbers were 33, 14 and 29%. The differences between both GLM and carprofen compared to the placebo group at time W8 were significant (P = 0.021 and P = 0.008, respectively).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: For the same three, the odds ratio and their confidence interval were over one.The extent of improvement was significantly different between the GLM and the control in veterinary-assessed mobility (P = 0.012) and pain VAS (P = 0.004).In conclusion, GLM alleviated chronic orthopedic pain in dogs although it was not as effective as carprofen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, University of Helsinki, PO Box 57, FI-00014, Finland. anna.hielm-bjorkman@helsinki.fi.

ABSTRACT
A green-lipped mussel (GLM) preparation was evaluated in a randomized, double-controlled and double-blinded clinical trial. It was hypothesized that the treatment effect would be less than that of the positive control (carprofen) but more than that of the negative control (placebo). Forty-five dogs with chronic pain and a radiographic diagnosis of osteoarthritis that were randomly allocated into one of three groups completed the study. All dogs were fed the test products or placebo for 8 weeks. The dogs were evaluated four times, at 4-week intervals. Six different variables were assessed: veterinary-assessed mobility index, two force plate variables, owner-evaluated chronic pain index and pain as well as locomotion visual analogue scales (VASs). Intake of extra carprofen was also evaluated. A chi-squared and a Mann-Whitney test were used to determine significance between groups. When changed to dichotomous variables, there were more dogs in the GLM than in the placebo group that improved, according to veterinary-assessed mobility, owner-evaluated chronic pain index and pain VAS (P = 0.031, P = 0.025, P = 0.011, respectively). For the same three, the odds ratio and their confidence interval were over one. The extent of improvement was significantly different between the GLM and the control in veterinary-assessed mobility (P = 0.012) and pain VAS (P = 0.004). In conclusion, GLM alleviated chronic orthopedic pain in dogs although it was not as effective as carprofen. As no side-effects were detected, GLM may be beneficial in dogs e.g. when non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cannot be used.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus