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Desloratadine for the Relief of Nasal and Non-nasal Allergy Symptoms: An Observational Study.

Aberer W - Arch Drug Inf (2009)

Bottom Line: Second-generation antihistamines have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of symptoms of allergic disease.A significant reduction in severity scores was observed in all symptom subgroups (P < 0.001).Thirty-one subjects (3.2%) experienced adverse events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Dermatology, Medical University of Graz Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
INTRODUCTION: The rates of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and atopic eczema range from 6% to 16% globally. Second-generation antihistamines have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of symptoms of allergic disease. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of desloratadine, a nonsedating second-generation antihistamine, in the treatment of common allergy symptoms. METHODS: In this open-label, uncontrolled, non-randomized, observational study, subjects (N = 973) with allergy symptoms were given desloratadine 5 mg daily for 3 weeks. Nasal, ocular, and dermal symptom severity was rated as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe; changes in the percentage of subjects in each severity category were assessed. Overall efficacy and tolerability of desloratadine treatment were evaluated separately by physicians and subjects. RESULTS: Allergic rhinitis was the most frequent diagnosis, occurring in 59.0% of subjects. Approximately 40% of subjects had received previous treatment with other antihistamines, systemic/topical glucocorticosteroids, or beta-sympathicomimetics. Slightly more than half of subjects received concomitant medication during the study; 263 (53.0%) of those used intranasal steroids. A significant reduction in severity scores was observed in all symptom subgroups (P < 0.001). Desloratadine efficacy was judged to be excellent or good by 90.2% of physicians and 88.6% of subjects; 82.5% of investigators and 80.9% of subjects considered it more effective than previous therapy. The tolerability of desloratadine was rated excellent or good by 97.0% of both groups. Thirty-one subjects (3.2%) experienced adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In an open-label, uncontrolled, non-randomized, observational study allergy symptoms improved significantly in subjects treated with desloratadine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Baseline-to-endpoint changes in severity of nasal symptoms of sneezing/itching (A), rhinorrhea (B), and congestion (C) after 3 weeks of desloratadine treatment. Severity was rated as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe.
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fig01: Baseline-to-endpoint changes in severity of nasal symptoms of sneezing/itching (A), rhinorrhea (B), and congestion (C) after 3 weeks of desloratadine treatment. Severity was rated as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe.

Mentions: The percentage of subjects with no or only mild nasal symptoms increased from 42.9% at baseline to 95.2% after desloratadine treatment for sneezing/itching; from 40.5% to 94.4% for rhinorrhea; and from 33.7% to 90.7% for nasal congestion (Figure 1). The proportion with moderate or severe nasal symptoms decreased from 57.2% at baseline to 4.8% at endpoint in subjects with sneezing/itching; from 59.5% to 5.6% in those with rhinorrhea; and from 66.2% to 9.2% in those with nasal congestion.


Desloratadine for the Relief of Nasal and Non-nasal Allergy Symptoms: An Observational Study.

Aberer W - Arch Drug Inf (2009)

Baseline-to-endpoint changes in severity of nasal symptoms of sneezing/itching (A), rhinorrhea (B), and congestion (C) after 3 weeks of desloratadine treatment. Severity was rated as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2721966&req=5

fig01: Baseline-to-endpoint changes in severity of nasal symptoms of sneezing/itching (A), rhinorrhea (B), and congestion (C) after 3 weeks of desloratadine treatment. Severity was rated as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe.
Mentions: The percentage of subjects with no or only mild nasal symptoms increased from 42.9% at baseline to 95.2% after desloratadine treatment for sneezing/itching; from 40.5% to 94.4% for rhinorrhea; and from 33.7% to 90.7% for nasal congestion (Figure 1). The proportion with moderate or severe nasal symptoms decreased from 57.2% at baseline to 4.8% at endpoint in subjects with sneezing/itching; from 59.5% to 5.6% in those with rhinorrhea; and from 66.2% to 9.2% in those with nasal congestion.

Bottom Line: Second-generation antihistamines have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of symptoms of allergic disease.A significant reduction in severity scores was observed in all symptom subgroups (P < 0.001).Thirty-one subjects (3.2%) experienced adverse events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Dermatology, Medical University of Graz Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
INTRODUCTION: The rates of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and atopic eczema range from 6% to 16% globally. Second-generation antihistamines have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of symptoms of allergic disease. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of desloratadine, a nonsedating second-generation antihistamine, in the treatment of common allergy symptoms. METHODS: In this open-label, uncontrolled, non-randomized, observational study, subjects (N = 973) with allergy symptoms were given desloratadine 5 mg daily for 3 weeks. Nasal, ocular, and dermal symptom severity was rated as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe; changes in the percentage of subjects in each severity category were assessed. Overall efficacy and tolerability of desloratadine treatment were evaluated separately by physicians and subjects. RESULTS: Allergic rhinitis was the most frequent diagnosis, occurring in 59.0% of subjects. Approximately 40% of subjects had received previous treatment with other antihistamines, systemic/topical glucocorticosteroids, or beta-sympathicomimetics. Slightly more than half of subjects received concomitant medication during the study; 263 (53.0%) of those used intranasal steroids. A significant reduction in severity scores was observed in all symptom subgroups (P < 0.001). Desloratadine efficacy was judged to be excellent or good by 90.2% of physicians and 88.6% of subjects; 82.5% of investigators and 80.9% of subjects considered it more effective than previous therapy. The tolerability of desloratadine was rated excellent or good by 97.0% of both groups. Thirty-one subjects (3.2%) experienced adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In an open-label, uncontrolled, non-randomized, observational study allergy symptoms improved significantly in subjects treated with desloratadine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus