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Effects of bladder training and/or tolterodine in female patients with overactive bladder syndrome: a prospective, randomized study.

Song C, Park JT, Heo KO, Lee KS, Choo MS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: The decrease in frequency was significantly greater in the Co group than in the BT group (p<0.05).Mean urgency score decreased by 44.8%, 62.2% and 60.2% in the BT, To, and Co groups, respectively, and the improvement was significantly greater in the To and Co groups than in the BT group (p<0.05 for each).Although BT, To and their combination were all effective in controlling OAB symptoms, combination therapy was more effective than either method alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Poongnapdong, Songpa-Gu, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We compared the effects of bladder training and/or tolterodine as first line treatment in female patients with overactive bladder (OAB). One hundred and thirty-nine female patients with OAB were randomized to treatment with bladder training (BT), tolterodine (To, 2 mg twice daily) or both (Co) for 12 weeks. Treatment efficacy was measured by micturition diary, urgency scores and patients' subjective assessment of their bladder condition. Mean frequency and nocturia significantly decreased in all treatment groups, declining 25.9% and 56.1%, respectively, in the BT group; 30.2% and 65.4%, respectively, in the To group; and 33.5% and 66.3%, respectively in the Co group (p<0.05 for each). The decrease in frequency was significantly greater in the Co group than in the BT group (p<0.05). Mean urgency score decreased by 44.8%, 62.2% and 60.2% in the BT, To, and Co groups, respectively, and the improvement was significantly greater in the To and Co groups than in the BT group (p<0.05 for each). Although BT, To and their combination were all effective in controlling OAB symptoms, combination therapy was more effective than either method alone. Tolterodine alone may be instituted as a first-line therapy, but may be more effective when combined with bladder training.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in nocturia after 12 weeks of treatment (*p<0.05). Changes in nocturia did not differ among the groups.
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Figure 2: Changes in nocturia after 12 weeks of treatment (*p<0.05). Changes in nocturia did not differ among the groups.

Mentions: At 12 weeks, 26 patients (56.5%) in the BT group, 32 (68.1 %) in the To group, and 31 (67.4%) in the Co group had completed the protocol. Mean frequency in the three groups decreased significantly, from 10.9 to 8.1 (25.9%) in the BT group, from 11.6 to 8.1 (30.2%) in the To group, and from 11.9 to 7.9 (33.5%) in the Co group (p<0.05 each) (Fig. 1). Nocturia also decreased significantly in the three groups, from 1.5 to 0.6 per night (56.1%) in the BT group, from 1.7 to 0.6 (65.4%) in the To group, and from 2.0 to 0.6 (66.3%) in the Co group (p<0.05 each) (Fig. 2), as did urgency scores, from 2.6 to 1.4 (44.8%) in the BT group, from 2.8 to 1.1 (62.2%) in the To group, and from 3.0 to 1.2 (60.2%) in the Co group (p<0.05 each) (Fig. 3). When we compared these changes among the three groups, we found that patients in the Co group showed greater improvements in frequency and urgency scores than did patients in the BT group (p<0.05 each), and that urgency scores in the To and Co groups showed significantly greater improvement than in the BT group (p=0.017 and p=0.021, respectively). No difference was observed between the To and Co groups.


Effects of bladder training and/or tolterodine in female patients with overactive bladder syndrome: a prospective, randomized study.

Song C, Park JT, Heo KO, Lee KS, Choo MS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2006)

Changes in nocturia after 12 weeks of treatment (*p<0.05). Changes in nocturia did not differ among the groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2721929&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in nocturia after 12 weeks of treatment (*p<0.05). Changes in nocturia did not differ among the groups.
Mentions: At 12 weeks, 26 patients (56.5%) in the BT group, 32 (68.1 %) in the To group, and 31 (67.4%) in the Co group had completed the protocol. Mean frequency in the three groups decreased significantly, from 10.9 to 8.1 (25.9%) in the BT group, from 11.6 to 8.1 (30.2%) in the To group, and from 11.9 to 7.9 (33.5%) in the Co group (p<0.05 each) (Fig. 1). Nocturia also decreased significantly in the three groups, from 1.5 to 0.6 per night (56.1%) in the BT group, from 1.7 to 0.6 (65.4%) in the To group, and from 2.0 to 0.6 (66.3%) in the Co group (p<0.05 each) (Fig. 2), as did urgency scores, from 2.6 to 1.4 (44.8%) in the BT group, from 2.8 to 1.1 (62.2%) in the To group, and from 3.0 to 1.2 (60.2%) in the Co group (p<0.05 each) (Fig. 3). When we compared these changes among the three groups, we found that patients in the Co group showed greater improvements in frequency and urgency scores than did patients in the BT group (p<0.05 each), and that urgency scores in the To and Co groups showed significantly greater improvement than in the BT group (p=0.017 and p=0.021, respectively). No difference was observed between the To and Co groups.

Bottom Line: The decrease in frequency was significantly greater in the Co group than in the BT group (p<0.05).Mean urgency score decreased by 44.8%, 62.2% and 60.2% in the BT, To, and Co groups, respectively, and the improvement was significantly greater in the To and Co groups than in the BT group (p<0.05 for each).Although BT, To and their combination were all effective in controlling OAB symptoms, combination therapy was more effective than either method alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Poongnapdong, Songpa-Gu, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We compared the effects of bladder training and/or tolterodine as first line treatment in female patients with overactive bladder (OAB). One hundred and thirty-nine female patients with OAB were randomized to treatment with bladder training (BT), tolterodine (To, 2 mg twice daily) or both (Co) for 12 weeks. Treatment efficacy was measured by micturition diary, urgency scores and patients' subjective assessment of their bladder condition. Mean frequency and nocturia significantly decreased in all treatment groups, declining 25.9% and 56.1%, respectively, in the BT group; 30.2% and 65.4%, respectively, in the To group; and 33.5% and 66.3%, respectively in the Co group (p<0.05 for each). The decrease in frequency was significantly greater in the Co group than in the BT group (p<0.05). Mean urgency score decreased by 44.8%, 62.2% and 60.2% in the BT, To, and Co groups, respectively, and the improvement was significantly greater in the To and Co groups than in the BT group (p<0.05 for each). Although BT, To and their combination were all effective in controlling OAB symptoms, combination therapy was more effective than either method alone. Tolterodine alone may be instituted as a first-line therapy, but may be more effective when combined with bladder training.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus