Limits...
PESTICIDES: toward DDT-free malaria control.

Burton A - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

An increased international effort to reduce the incidence of malaria around the globe while reducing reliance on DDT was announced 6 May 2009 at the fourth meeting of the Conference to the Parties to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)... With funding of more than US$70 million, the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Health Organization have launched 10 projects to help test integrated vector management (IVM) systems for malaria control... These systems could provide sustainable, effective, and cost-effective alternatives to reliance on DDT... The aim is to reduce DDT application by 30% over current usage by 2014, with a complete phaseout by the early 2020s... This practice, known as indoor residual spraying (IRS), is increasingly relied upon in Africa and Asia, given the resurgence in malaria in recent decades... Reports also exist that, on occasions, some developing countries contravene the Stockholm Convention and on a larger scale. growing evidence resistance to DDT as well as adverse human health effects has prompted a search for alternatives. “There is a large and growing body of literature on the potential human health effects of DDT,” says Brenda Eskenazi, a professor of epidemiology and maternal and child health at the University of California, Berkeley. “Evidence suggests that exposure to DDT and its breakdown product DDE at levels substantially lower than that experienced in communities that use IRS may be associated with breast cancer, diabetes, spontaneous abortions, decreased semen quality, and impaired child neurodevelopment. ” Great care is taken and safeguards followed in the new projects—which involve 40 countries across Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia—to ensure that malaria incidence does not increase in the project areas, says Laurent Granier, coordinator of the Chemicals Cluster for the GEF... In a project being undertaken in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, researchers from Duke University are developing the Malaria Decision Analysis Support Tool (MDAST), which applies existing knowledge and evidence about specific malaria interventions to help officials predict the probable outcomes of different combinations of malaria control strategies and weigh the risks and benefits... They can then make the best choices for disease management and vector control given the environmental and societal parameters of specific situations. “Controlling malaria requires a coordinated adaptive decision-making approach based on the best available evidence from the field,” explains MDAST developer Randall Kramer, a professor of resource and environmental economics at Duke... Kramer and colleagues described the MDAST in an article published 6 April 2009 ahead of print in Health Policy... A potential problem faced by IVM is the lack of sustained interest by communities that are responsible for the maintenance of IVM strategies—for instance, ensuring that water does not re-collect in ditches... But properly implemented IRS strategies also require sustained input as well as an expensive-to-maintain infrastructure... Hopefully, the results of these projects will allow developing countries to reduce their dependence on DDT, thus avoiding its potentially harmful effects on human health and the environment, while reducing the prevalence of malaria—a disease that has killed five children in the time it took you to read this article.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Kerfi, eastern Chad (inset: P. falciparum). Treated bed nets are one potentially safer alternative to DDT in fighting malaria.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2721887&req=5

f1-ehp-117-a344: Kerfi, eastern Chad (inset: P. falciparum). Treated bed nets are one potentially safer alternative to DDT in fighting malaria.


PESTICIDES: toward DDT-free malaria control.

Burton A - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Kerfi, eastern Chad (inset: P. falciparum). Treated bed nets are one potentially safer alternative to DDT in fighting malaria.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2721887&req=5

f1-ehp-117-a344: Kerfi, eastern Chad (inset: P. falciparum). Treated bed nets are one potentially safer alternative to DDT in fighting malaria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

An increased international effort to reduce the incidence of malaria around the globe while reducing reliance on DDT was announced 6 May 2009 at the fourth meeting of the Conference to the Parties to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)... With funding of more than US$70 million, the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Health Organization have launched 10 projects to help test integrated vector management (IVM) systems for malaria control... These systems could provide sustainable, effective, and cost-effective alternatives to reliance on DDT... The aim is to reduce DDT application by 30% over current usage by 2014, with a complete phaseout by the early 2020s... This practice, known as indoor residual spraying (IRS), is increasingly relied upon in Africa and Asia, given the resurgence in malaria in recent decades... Reports also exist that, on occasions, some developing countries contravene the Stockholm Convention and on a larger scale. growing evidence resistance to DDT as well as adverse human health effects has prompted a search for alternatives. “There is a large and growing body of literature on the potential human health effects of DDT,” says Brenda Eskenazi, a professor of epidemiology and maternal and child health at the University of California, Berkeley. “Evidence suggests that exposure to DDT and its breakdown product DDE at levels substantially lower than that experienced in communities that use IRS may be associated with breast cancer, diabetes, spontaneous abortions, decreased semen quality, and impaired child neurodevelopment. ” Great care is taken and safeguards followed in the new projects—which involve 40 countries across Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia—to ensure that malaria incidence does not increase in the project areas, says Laurent Granier, coordinator of the Chemicals Cluster for the GEF... In a project being undertaken in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, researchers from Duke University are developing the Malaria Decision Analysis Support Tool (MDAST), which applies existing knowledge and evidence about specific malaria interventions to help officials predict the probable outcomes of different combinations of malaria control strategies and weigh the risks and benefits... They can then make the best choices for disease management and vector control given the environmental and societal parameters of specific situations. “Controlling malaria requires a coordinated adaptive decision-making approach based on the best available evidence from the field,” explains MDAST developer Randall Kramer, a professor of resource and environmental economics at Duke... Kramer and colleagues described the MDAST in an article published 6 April 2009 ahead of print in Health Policy... A potential problem faced by IVM is the lack of sustained interest by communities that are responsible for the maintenance of IVM strategies—for instance, ensuring that water does not re-collect in ditches... But properly implemented IRS strategies also require sustained input as well as an expensive-to-maintain infrastructure... Hopefully, the results of these projects will allow developing countries to reduce their dependence on DDT, thus avoiding its potentially harmful effects on human health and the environment, while reducing the prevalence of malaria—a disease that has killed five children in the time it took you to read this article.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus