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Making the needed linkages and economic case for continued lead-paint abatement.

Geller AM - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

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The connection between environmental public health regulations, regulatory science, and public health gains can, at times, be difficult to elucidate... In the July 2009 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, used data accumulated over the past decade on the linkage between environmental lead exposures and health effects to present a compelling description of the potential costs and benefits of lead hazard control, concentrating on the residential lead paint hazard... In her analysis, Gould incorporated certain health, social, and behavioral costs and benefits left out of earlier valuation analyses associated with lead arguing, in effect, that these data have reached a level of maturity that permits their inclusion... Abatement is a good indicator of success... The accumulated evidence is clear: Abatement reduces dust-lead loadings when measured as far out as 3 years after treatment... This abatement results in decreases in whole blood lead levels of approximately 20–26% within a year for population samples of children with preabatement levels just above the current intervention level (geometric mean, 11 μg/dL; ) and at higher levels (23 μg/dL; )... Gould’s focus on paint hazard highlights the dramatic decrease in the level of lead exposure and associated biomarker levels due to the reduction of lead content in gasoline, household paint, industrial emissions, drinking water, food canning, and ceramic glazes... These children and others in lead exposure hot spots have not fully shared the benefits of the regulatory and mitigation actions that have brought the national average down to 1.5 μg/dL... The analysis by offers an opportunity in all of these areas by bringing a broad consideration of publicly available medical, economic, and social sciences to bear on the well-developed understanding of the sources and routes of lead exposure... Further, Gould identifies and quantifies the costs and benefits of closing the book on a major remaining facet of our nation’s lead problem... Recent research has identified associations between cumulative lead exposure and cognitive impairment, hypertension, and other health outcomes in older adults... In her analysis, demonstrated significant benefits to improving public health by lead paint remediation or control, adding an economic basis to the health and exposure data that make a process indicator such as paint hazard abatement a reasonable surrogate for exposure and health indicators for children... If the linkages found for children also apply to older adults, it will be important to assess whether additional, economically quantifiable benefit can be gained from remediation aimed at aging adults, the most rapidly growing portion of the U.S. population.

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Andrew M. Geller
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f2-ehp-117-a332: Andrew M. Geller


Making the needed linkages and economic case for continued lead-paint abatement.

Geller AM - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Andrew M. Geller
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2721880&req=5

f2-ehp-117-a332: Andrew M. Geller

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The connection between environmental public health regulations, regulatory science, and public health gains can, at times, be difficult to elucidate... In the July 2009 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, used data accumulated over the past decade on the linkage between environmental lead exposures and health effects to present a compelling description of the potential costs and benefits of lead hazard control, concentrating on the residential lead paint hazard... In her analysis, Gould incorporated certain health, social, and behavioral costs and benefits left out of earlier valuation analyses associated with lead arguing, in effect, that these data have reached a level of maturity that permits their inclusion... Abatement is a good indicator of success... The accumulated evidence is clear: Abatement reduces dust-lead loadings when measured as far out as 3 years after treatment... This abatement results in decreases in whole blood lead levels of approximately 20–26% within a year for population samples of children with preabatement levels just above the current intervention level (geometric mean, 11 μg/dL; ) and at higher levels (23 μg/dL; )... Gould’s focus on paint hazard highlights the dramatic decrease in the level of lead exposure and associated biomarker levels due to the reduction of lead content in gasoline, household paint, industrial emissions, drinking water, food canning, and ceramic glazes... These children and others in lead exposure hot spots have not fully shared the benefits of the regulatory and mitigation actions that have brought the national average down to 1.5 μg/dL... The analysis by offers an opportunity in all of these areas by bringing a broad consideration of publicly available medical, economic, and social sciences to bear on the well-developed understanding of the sources and routes of lead exposure... Further, Gould identifies and quantifies the costs and benefits of closing the book on a major remaining facet of our nation’s lead problem... Recent research has identified associations between cumulative lead exposure and cognitive impairment, hypertension, and other health outcomes in older adults... In her analysis, demonstrated significant benefits to improving public health by lead paint remediation or control, adding an economic basis to the health and exposure data that make a process indicator such as paint hazard abatement a reasonable surrogate for exposure and health indicators for children... If the linkages found for children also apply to older adults, it will be important to assess whether additional, economically quantifiable benefit can be gained from remediation aimed at aging adults, the most rapidly growing portion of the U.S. population.

Show MeSH