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Salter-Harris II injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome: a case report.

Clement ND, Goswami A - J Orthop Surg Res (2009)

Bottom Line: We present a case of a Salter-Harris II injury to the proximal tibia associated with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome.The potential complications of this injury are limb threatening and the neurovasular status of the limb should be continually monitored.Maintaining anatomic reduction is difficult and fixation may be needed to achieve optimal results.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Little France, Edinburgh, EH16 4SU, UK. nickclement@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT
We present a case of a Salter-Harris II injury to the proximal tibia associated with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome. The potential complications of this injury are limb threatening and the neurovasular status of the limb should be continually monitored. Maintaining anatomic reduction is difficult and fixation may be needed to achieve optimal results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immediate post-operative radiographs.
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Figure 2: Immediate post-operative radiographs.

Mentions: Radiographs revealed a Salter-Harris II injury, with a lateral metaphyseal extension and posterior displacement of the tibia (Figure 1). She was then taken to theatre within 5 hours of presentation, however at this time she complained of "pins and needles" over the dorsum of her foot. The pulses were re-examined, and found to be absent. Under general anaesthetic the fracture was reduced. This was achieved with forward traction over the proximal tibia distal to the epiphysis, with the knee flexed to 100 degrees. On reduction the peripheral pulses returned but remained weak. The fracture remained unstable and continued to fall back to its original position with loss of pulses on release of traction. Reduction was held with four Kirschner (K-) wires (Figure 2).


Salter-Harris II injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome: a case report.

Clement ND, Goswami A - J Orthop Surg Res (2009)

Immediate post-operative radiographs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2721829&req=5

Figure 2: Immediate post-operative radiographs.
Mentions: Radiographs revealed a Salter-Harris II injury, with a lateral metaphyseal extension and posterior displacement of the tibia (Figure 1). She was then taken to theatre within 5 hours of presentation, however at this time she complained of "pins and needles" over the dorsum of her foot. The pulses were re-examined, and found to be absent. Under general anaesthetic the fracture was reduced. This was achieved with forward traction over the proximal tibia distal to the epiphysis, with the knee flexed to 100 degrees. On reduction the peripheral pulses returned but remained weak. The fracture remained unstable and continued to fall back to its original position with loss of pulses on release of traction. Reduction was held with four Kirschner (K-) wires (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We present a case of a Salter-Harris II injury to the proximal tibia associated with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome.The potential complications of this injury are limb threatening and the neurovasular status of the limb should be continually monitored.Maintaining anatomic reduction is difficult and fixation may be needed to achieve optimal results.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Little France, Edinburgh, EH16 4SU, UK. nickclement@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT
We present a case of a Salter-Harris II injury to the proximal tibia associated with both vascular compromise and compartment syndrome. The potential complications of this injury are limb threatening and the neurovasular status of the limb should be continually monitored. Maintaining anatomic reduction is difficult and fixation may be needed to achieve optimal results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus