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The mycobacterial glycolipid glucose monomycolate induces a memory T cell response comparable to a model protein antigen and no B cell response upon experimental vaccination of cattle.

Nguyen TK, Koets AP, Santema WJ, van Eden W, Rutten VP, Van Rhijn I - Vaccine (2009)

Bottom Line: Glycolipids are presented to T cells by human group 1 CD1 proteins, but are not used as subunit vaccines yet.Also, KLH induced strong antibody responses whereas GMM did not.These data suggest that non-overlapping T cell populations are targeted and demonstrate the potential of glycolipids as a special class of subunit vaccine candidates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Glycolipids are presented to T cells by human group 1 CD1 proteins, but are not used as subunit vaccines yet. Experimental immunizations with pure mycobacterial glucose monomycolate (GMM) and keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) in cattle, a species which, unlike mice, expresses group 1 CD1, showed that GMM was equally efficient as KLH in generating T cell responses in blood, but not in the draining lymph node. Also, KLH induced strong antibody responses whereas GMM did not. These data suggest that non-overlapping T cell populations are targeted and demonstrate the potential of glycolipids as a special class of subunit vaccine candidates.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison between T cell responses in draining lymph nodes and PBMC. T cell proliferation assays were performed 4.5 months after the second set of GMM/KLH immunizations using cell suspensions from the left (KLH immunization side) and right (GMM immunization side) prescapular lymph nodes (A), and from PBMC (B). The results shown here were obtained with material from one animal. Highly comparable results were obtained in a second animal (not shown).
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fig4: Comparison between T cell responses in draining lymph nodes and PBMC. T cell proliferation assays were performed 4.5 months after the second set of GMM/KLH immunizations using cell suspensions from the left (KLH immunization side) and right (GMM immunization side) prescapular lymph nodes (A), and from PBMC (B). The results shown here were obtained with material from one animal. Highly comparable results were obtained in a second animal (not shown).

Mentions: Protein-specific T cells can readily be detected in lymph nodes, where they can provide help to B cells, and they are usually highly abundant in the lymph nodes that drain an area of immunization or infection. To assess whether this is also the case for CD1-presented lipid antigen, the left and right prescapular lymph nodes that drained the area of immunization of two GMM/KLH-immunized animals that were euthanized at the end of the experiment were collected and used for T cell proliferation assays. As expected, a very strong anti-KLH response was elicited in both lymph nodes. The response in the left lymph node, where the KLH immunizations were applied, was stronger than in the right lymph node. Interestingly, no anti-GMM T cell response could be detected at all in any of the lymph nodes (Fig. 4A). An experiment performed on the same day on PBMC from the same animals showed clear T cell responses against KLH and GMM of comparable strength, though lower than the KLH responses measured in lymph nodes (Fig. 4B).


The mycobacterial glycolipid glucose monomycolate induces a memory T cell response comparable to a model protein antigen and no B cell response upon experimental vaccination of cattle.

Nguyen TK, Koets AP, Santema WJ, van Eden W, Rutten VP, Van Rhijn I - Vaccine (2009)

Comparison between T cell responses in draining lymph nodes and PBMC. T cell proliferation assays were performed 4.5 months after the second set of GMM/KLH immunizations using cell suspensions from the left (KLH immunization side) and right (GMM immunization side) prescapular lymph nodes (A), and from PBMC (B). The results shown here were obtained with material from one animal. Highly comparable results were obtained in a second animal (not shown).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2719691&req=5

fig4: Comparison between T cell responses in draining lymph nodes and PBMC. T cell proliferation assays were performed 4.5 months after the second set of GMM/KLH immunizations using cell suspensions from the left (KLH immunization side) and right (GMM immunization side) prescapular lymph nodes (A), and from PBMC (B). The results shown here were obtained with material from one animal. Highly comparable results were obtained in a second animal (not shown).
Mentions: Protein-specific T cells can readily be detected in lymph nodes, where they can provide help to B cells, and they are usually highly abundant in the lymph nodes that drain an area of immunization or infection. To assess whether this is also the case for CD1-presented lipid antigen, the left and right prescapular lymph nodes that drained the area of immunization of two GMM/KLH-immunized animals that were euthanized at the end of the experiment were collected and used for T cell proliferation assays. As expected, a very strong anti-KLH response was elicited in both lymph nodes. The response in the left lymph node, where the KLH immunizations were applied, was stronger than in the right lymph node. Interestingly, no anti-GMM T cell response could be detected at all in any of the lymph nodes (Fig. 4A). An experiment performed on the same day on PBMC from the same animals showed clear T cell responses against KLH and GMM of comparable strength, though lower than the KLH responses measured in lymph nodes (Fig. 4B).

Bottom Line: Glycolipids are presented to T cells by human group 1 CD1 proteins, but are not used as subunit vaccines yet.Also, KLH induced strong antibody responses whereas GMM did not.These data suggest that non-overlapping T cell populations are targeted and demonstrate the potential of glycolipids as a special class of subunit vaccine candidates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Glycolipids are presented to T cells by human group 1 CD1 proteins, but are not used as subunit vaccines yet. Experimental immunizations with pure mycobacterial glucose monomycolate (GMM) and keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) in cattle, a species which, unlike mice, expresses group 1 CD1, showed that GMM was equally efficient as KLH in generating T cell responses in blood, but not in the draining lymph node. Also, KLH induced strong antibody responses whereas GMM did not. These data suggest that non-overlapping T cell populations are targeted and demonstrate the potential of glycolipids as a special class of subunit vaccine candidates.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus