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Development of SSR markers and analysis of diversity in Turkish populations of Brachypodium distachyon.

Vogel JP, Tuna M, Budak H, Huo N, Gu YQ, Steinwand MA - BMC Plant Biol. (2009)

Bottom Line: Phenotypic analysis of this new germplasm resource revealed considerable variation in flowering time, seed size, and plant architecture.Taken together, the inbreeding nature and genotypic diversity observed at individual locations suggest a significant amount of long-distance seed dispersal.The resources developed in this study are freely available to the research community and will facilitate experimental applications based on natural diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS, Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA, USA. john.vogel@ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT

Background: Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is rapidly emerging as a powerful model system to facilitate research aimed at improving grass crops for grain, forage and energy production. To characterize the natural diversity of Brachypodium and provide a valuable new tool to the growing list of resources available to Brachypodium researchers, we created and characterized a large, diverse collection of inbred lines.

Results: We developed 84 inbred lines from eight locations in Turkey. To enable genotypic characterization of this collection, we created 398 SSR markers from BAC end and EST sequences. An analysis of 187 diploid lines from 56 locations with 43 SSR markers showed considerable genotypic diversity. There was some correlation between SSR genotypes and broad geographic regions, but there was also a high level of genotypic diversity at individual locations. Phenotypic analysis of this new germplasm resource revealed considerable variation in flowering time, seed size, and plant architecture. The inbreeding nature of Brachypodium was confirmed by an extremely high level of homozygosity in wild plants and a lack of cross-pollination under laboratory conditions.

Conclusion: Taken together, the inbreeding nature and genotypic diversity observed at individual locations suggest a significant amount of long-distance seed dispersal. The resources developed in this study are freely available to the research community and will facilitate experimental applications based on natural diversity.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of collection sites in Turkey. Numbers correspond to the location numbers listed in additional file 3. Collections made by HB are designated by red dots and collections made by MT are designated by blue squares.
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Figure 2: Location of collection sites in Turkey. Numbers correspond to the location numbers listed in additional file 3. Collections made by HB are designated by red dots and collections made by MT are designated by blue squares.

Mentions: Two new collections of Brachypodium accessions were used in this study. The first collection was made by MT between June 6 and July 10, 2006 from eight locations in Turkey (Figure 2). For three locations (Adiyaman, Gaziantep, Tekirdag) an area of ~10,000 m2 was sampled by collecting seed from individual plants scattered across the site. Bulk collections of several plants at different sub-sites were also made. Inbred lines were made from each of the different individual plants that were collected. From five sites (Balli, Bismil, Iskenderun, Kahta, Kozluk) only one bulk collection from plants growing in small area of a few square meters was made. For these locations eight inbred lines were made by sub-sampling the bulk seed. All sites except Tekirdag were overgrazed hilly pasture with continental climate (very dry with hot summers and cold winters). Tekirdag lies near the Marmara Sea and so has a more maritime climate (higher humidity, more precipitation, relatively cooler summer and warmer winters). The Tekirdag site is also forested and so was shaded and not subject to grazing. The 84 inbred lines developed from material collected by MT were named using the first three letters of a nearby town as the prefix. The locations and other details of these collections are summarized in additional file 3. These lines were inbred for two generations.


Development of SSR markers and analysis of diversity in Turkish populations of Brachypodium distachyon.

Vogel JP, Tuna M, Budak H, Huo N, Gu YQ, Steinwand MA - BMC Plant Biol. (2009)

Location of collection sites in Turkey. Numbers correspond to the location numbers listed in additional file 3. Collections made by HB are designated by red dots and collections made by MT are designated by blue squares.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2719641&req=5

Figure 2: Location of collection sites in Turkey. Numbers correspond to the location numbers listed in additional file 3. Collections made by HB are designated by red dots and collections made by MT are designated by blue squares.
Mentions: Two new collections of Brachypodium accessions were used in this study. The first collection was made by MT between June 6 and July 10, 2006 from eight locations in Turkey (Figure 2). For three locations (Adiyaman, Gaziantep, Tekirdag) an area of ~10,000 m2 was sampled by collecting seed from individual plants scattered across the site. Bulk collections of several plants at different sub-sites were also made. Inbred lines were made from each of the different individual plants that were collected. From five sites (Balli, Bismil, Iskenderun, Kahta, Kozluk) only one bulk collection from plants growing in small area of a few square meters was made. For these locations eight inbred lines were made by sub-sampling the bulk seed. All sites except Tekirdag were overgrazed hilly pasture with continental climate (very dry with hot summers and cold winters). Tekirdag lies near the Marmara Sea and so has a more maritime climate (higher humidity, more precipitation, relatively cooler summer and warmer winters). The Tekirdag site is also forested and so was shaded and not subject to grazing. The 84 inbred lines developed from material collected by MT were named using the first three letters of a nearby town as the prefix. The locations and other details of these collections are summarized in additional file 3. These lines were inbred for two generations.

Bottom Line: Phenotypic analysis of this new germplasm resource revealed considerable variation in flowering time, seed size, and plant architecture.Taken together, the inbreeding nature and genotypic diversity observed at individual locations suggest a significant amount of long-distance seed dispersal.The resources developed in this study are freely available to the research community and will facilitate experimental applications based on natural diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS, Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA, USA. john.vogel@ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT

Background: Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is rapidly emerging as a powerful model system to facilitate research aimed at improving grass crops for grain, forage and energy production. To characterize the natural diversity of Brachypodium and provide a valuable new tool to the growing list of resources available to Brachypodium researchers, we created and characterized a large, diverse collection of inbred lines.

Results: We developed 84 inbred lines from eight locations in Turkey. To enable genotypic characterization of this collection, we created 398 SSR markers from BAC end and EST sequences. An analysis of 187 diploid lines from 56 locations with 43 SSR markers showed considerable genotypic diversity. There was some correlation between SSR genotypes and broad geographic regions, but there was also a high level of genotypic diversity at individual locations. Phenotypic analysis of this new germplasm resource revealed considerable variation in flowering time, seed size, and plant architecture. The inbreeding nature of Brachypodium was confirmed by an extremely high level of homozygosity in wild plants and a lack of cross-pollination under laboratory conditions.

Conclusion: Taken together, the inbreeding nature and genotypic diversity observed at individual locations suggest a significant amount of long-distance seed dispersal. The resources developed in this study are freely available to the research community and will facilitate experimental applications based on natural diversity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus