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Calcitonin gene-related peptide and thermal injury: review of literature.

Gherardini G, Curinga G, Colella G, Freda N, Rauso R - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: CGRP is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide, primarily released from sensory nerves and is well known as the most potent and long-lasting microvascular vasodilator in vitro and hypotensive agents in vivo.A wide range of proinflammatory stimuli can induce the release of neuropeptides from cutaneous sensory nerves, including heat, physical trauma, UV radiation, and irritant chemicals.These proinflammatory stimuli are known to induce the release of CGRP from cutaneous sensory nerves.The anti-inflammatory effects of CGRP in a range of species and in human clinical conditions are detailed, and potential therapeutic applications based on the use of antagonists and gene targeting of agonists are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery-Burn Unit, Civico and Benfratelli Hospital, Palermo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this review article is to report about the anti-inflammatory properties of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in burns. CGRP is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide, primarily released from sensory nerves and is well known as the most potent and long-lasting microvascular vasodilator in vitro and hypotensive agents in vivo.A wide range of proinflammatory stimuli can induce the release of neuropeptides from cutaneous sensory nerves, including heat, physical trauma, UV radiation, and irritant chemicals. These proinflammatory stimuli are known to induce the release of CGRP from cutaneous sensory nerves. The anti-inflammatory effects of CGRP in a range of species and in human clinical conditions are detailed, and potential therapeutic applications based on the use of antagonists and gene targeting of agonists are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The CGRP gene is expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and is upregulated by factors that include nerve growth factor (NGF) and tissue inflammation. CGRP is released from nerves in response to several stimuli, such as capsaicin and low pH, proteinase-activated receptor (PAR activation), and mediators (eg, kinins and prostaglandins [PG]). Opioids can inhibit the release of CGRP. The response to CGRP is inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonists
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Figure 2: The CGRP gene is expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and is upregulated by factors that include nerve growth factor (NGF) and tissue inflammation. CGRP is released from nerves in response to several stimuli, such as capsaicin and low pH, proteinase-activated receptor (PAR activation), and mediators (eg, kinins and prostaglandins [PG]). Opioids can inhibit the release of CGRP. The response to CGRP is inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonists

Mentions: CGRP was identified in 1982 when Rosenfeld et al4 showed that alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene generated mRNAs encoding a peptide they named CGRP. It is highly expressed in certain nerves and is now known to belong to a family that includes the more recently discovered peptides adrenomedullin and amylin. This group belongs to a larger family of peptides that includes calcitonin. Calcitonin is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption, acting via receptor-mediated inhibition of osteoclast function.69 The overall effect of CGRP on bone resorption is unclear, although it can inhibit osteoclast activity,70 but it is best known for its potent cardiovascular effects.71 CGRP is distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems and exhibits a range of biological effects on tissues including those associated with gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, and central nervous systems (Fig 2).63,72–78


Calcitonin gene-related peptide and thermal injury: review of literature.

Gherardini G, Curinga G, Colella G, Freda N, Rauso R - Eplasty (2009)

The CGRP gene is expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and is upregulated by factors that include nerve growth factor (NGF) and tissue inflammation. CGRP is released from nerves in response to several stimuli, such as capsaicin and low pH, proteinase-activated receptor (PAR activation), and mediators (eg, kinins and prostaglandins [PG]). Opioids can inhibit the release of CGRP. The response to CGRP is inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonists
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2719469&req=5

Figure 2: The CGRP gene is expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and is upregulated by factors that include nerve growth factor (NGF) and tissue inflammation. CGRP is released from nerves in response to several stimuli, such as capsaicin and low pH, proteinase-activated receptor (PAR activation), and mediators (eg, kinins and prostaglandins [PG]). Opioids can inhibit the release of CGRP. The response to CGRP is inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonists
Mentions: CGRP was identified in 1982 when Rosenfeld et al4 showed that alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene generated mRNAs encoding a peptide they named CGRP. It is highly expressed in certain nerves and is now known to belong to a family that includes the more recently discovered peptides adrenomedullin and amylin. This group belongs to a larger family of peptides that includes calcitonin. Calcitonin is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption, acting via receptor-mediated inhibition of osteoclast function.69 The overall effect of CGRP on bone resorption is unclear, although it can inhibit osteoclast activity,70 but it is best known for its potent cardiovascular effects.71 CGRP is distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems and exhibits a range of biological effects on tissues including those associated with gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, and central nervous systems (Fig 2).63,72–78

Bottom Line: CGRP is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide, primarily released from sensory nerves and is well known as the most potent and long-lasting microvascular vasodilator in vitro and hypotensive agents in vivo.A wide range of proinflammatory stimuli can induce the release of neuropeptides from cutaneous sensory nerves, including heat, physical trauma, UV radiation, and irritant chemicals.These proinflammatory stimuli are known to induce the release of CGRP from cutaneous sensory nerves.The anti-inflammatory effects of CGRP in a range of species and in human clinical conditions are detailed, and potential therapeutic applications based on the use of antagonists and gene targeting of agonists are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery-Burn Unit, Civico and Benfratelli Hospital, Palermo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this review article is to report about the anti-inflammatory properties of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in burns. CGRP is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide, primarily released from sensory nerves and is well known as the most potent and long-lasting microvascular vasodilator in vitro and hypotensive agents in vivo.A wide range of proinflammatory stimuli can induce the release of neuropeptides from cutaneous sensory nerves, including heat, physical trauma, UV radiation, and irritant chemicals. These proinflammatory stimuli are known to induce the release of CGRP from cutaneous sensory nerves. The anti-inflammatory effects of CGRP in a range of species and in human clinical conditions are detailed, and potential therapeutic applications based on the use of antagonists and gene targeting of agonists are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus