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The area of ground glass opacities of the lungs as a predictive factor in acute paraquat intoxication.

Kim YT, Jou SS, Lee HS, Gil HW, Yang JO, Lee EY, Hong SY - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: The plasma PQ levels were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (2.6+/-4.0 microg/mL vs. 0.2+/-0.4 microg/mL, P=0.02).No patients survived when the area with GGOs was more than 40% but all of the patients survived when the area affected by GGOs was less than 20%.In conclusion, the area of GGOs is a useful predictor of survival in acute PQ intoxication, especially in patients with low plasma PQ levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Even though plasma paraquat (PQ) levels have known to be an informative predictor, many patients succumb at low PQ levels in acute PQ intoxication. This study was designed to see whether the high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) of the lungs would be a predictive measure in acute PQ intoxication. HRCT of the lungs was obtained from 119 patients with acute PQ intoxication on 7 days after PQ ingestion. The areas with ground glass opacities (GGOs) were evaluated at five levels with the area measurement tool of the picture archiving and communication systems. Among 119 patients, 102 survived and 17 died. The plasma PQ levels were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (2.6+/-4.0 microg/mL vs. 0.2+/-0.4 microg/mL, P=0.02). The area with GGOs was 2.0+/-6.4% in the survivors and 73.0+/- 29.9% in the non-survivors (P<0.001). No patients survived when the area with GGOs was more than 40% but all of the patients survived when the area affected by GGOs was less than 20%. In conclusion, the area of GGOs is a useful predictor of survival in acute PQ intoxication, especially in patients with low plasma PQ levels.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The areas of GGO were measured at five locations (the top of aortic arch, AP window, LUL bronchus, right inferior pulmonary vein and the top of left diaphragm respectively) using the measurements of the free-pen tool of PACS. To calculate the percents of lung injury, the sum of the areas of GGO (A) at the five levels were divided by the sum of the area of the total lungs (B) at the respective levels.
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Figure 1: The areas of GGO were measured at five locations (the top of aortic arch, AP window, LUL bronchus, right inferior pulmonary vein and the top of left diaphragm respectively) using the measurements of the free-pen tool of PACS. To calculate the percents of lung injury, the sum of the areas of GGO (A) at the five levels were divided by the sum of the area of the total lungs (B) at the respective levels.

Mentions: The time interval between PQ ingestion and arrival to the IPP was 21.2±30.3 hr.


The area of ground glass opacities of the lungs as a predictive factor in acute paraquat intoxication.

Kim YT, Jou SS, Lee HS, Gil HW, Yang JO, Lee EY, Hong SY - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2009)

The areas of GGO were measured at five locations (the top of aortic arch, AP window, LUL bronchus, right inferior pulmonary vein and the top of left diaphragm respectively) using the measurements of the free-pen tool of PACS. To calculate the percents of lung injury, the sum of the areas of GGO (A) at the five levels were divided by the sum of the area of the total lungs (B) at the respective levels.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2719202&req=5

Figure 1: The areas of GGO were measured at five locations (the top of aortic arch, AP window, LUL bronchus, right inferior pulmonary vein and the top of left diaphragm respectively) using the measurements of the free-pen tool of PACS. To calculate the percents of lung injury, the sum of the areas of GGO (A) at the five levels were divided by the sum of the area of the total lungs (B) at the respective levels.
Mentions: The time interval between PQ ingestion and arrival to the IPP was 21.2±30.3 hr.

Bottom Line: The plasma PQ levels were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (2.6+/-4.0 microg/mL vs. 0.2+/-0.4 microg/mL, P=0.02).No patients survived when the area with GGOs was more than 40% but all of the patients survived when the area affected by GGOs was less than 20%.In conclusion, the area of GGOs is a useful predictor of survival in acute PQ intoxication, especially in patients with low plasma PQ levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Even though plasma paraquat (PQ) levels have known to be an informative predictor, many patients succumb at low PQ levels in acute PQ intoxication. This study was designed to see whether the high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) of the lungs would be a predictive measure in acute PQ intoxication. HRCT of the lungs was obtained from 119 patients with acute PQ intoxication on 7 days after PQ ingestion. The areas with ground glass opacities (GGOs) were evaluated at five levels with the area measurement tool of the picture archiving and communication systems. Among 119 patients, 102 survived and 17 died. The plasma PQ levels were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (2.6+/-4.0 microg/mL vs. 0.2+/-0.4 microg/mL, P=0.02). The area with GGOs was 2.0+/-6.4% in the survivors and 73.0+/- 29.9% in the non-survivors (P<0.001). No patients survived when the area with GGOs was more than 40% but all of the patients survived when the area affected by GGOs was less than 20%. In conclusion, the area of GGOs is a useful predictor of survival in acute PQ intoxication, especially in patients with low plasma PQ levels.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus