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Is the blood B-cell subset profile diagnostic for Sjogren syndrome?

Binard A, Le Pottier L, Devauchelle-Pensec V, Saraux A, Youinou P, Pers JO - Ann. Rheum. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: The percentage of Bm2 and Bm2' cells was increased in the patients with pSS compared with 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (p<0.001 for the two comparisons).In contrast, those of early Bm5 (eBm5) and Bm5 were decreased in patients with pSS, compared with patients with RA and with SLE (p<0.001 for the two comparisons).Given its presentation as a signature for pSS, relative to RA and SLE, such a distribution of B-cell subsets might provide a useful diagnostic tool.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: EA Immunologie et Pathologie, Université Européenne de Bretagne, et Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, et Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Brest, Brest F29609, France.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the relevance of the blood B-cell subset profile for the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome.

Methods: The distribution of mature blood B cells from Bm1 through Bm5 was determined in 161 patients, of whom 25 fulfilled the American-European Consensus Group criteria for primary SS (pSS), and 136 served as disease controls.

Results: The percentage of Bm2 and Bm2' cells was increased in the patients with pSS compared with 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (p<0.001 for the two comparisons). In contrast, those of early Bm5 (eBm5) and Bm5 were decreased in patients with pSS, compared with patients with RA and with SLE (p<0.001 for the two comparisons). The receiver operating characteristic curves allowed for an optimising cut-off value of Bm2+Bm2' cells at 71.1% for 88.0% sensitivity and 83.1% specificity, that of eBm5+Bm5 cells at < or =13.5% for 84.0% sensitivity and 83.1% specificity, and, consequently, that of Bm2+Bm2'/eBm5+Bm5 at > or =5 for 88.0% sensitivity and 84.6% specificity.

Conclusion: Given its presentation as a signature for pSS, relative to RA and SLE, such a distribution of B-cell subsets might provide a useful diagnostic tool.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression of IgD and CD38 distributes mature B (Bm) cells into sequential subsets from Bm1 through Bm5.11 These dot plots are representative examples of fluorescence-activated cell-sorter analysis of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and of normal controls.
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ARD-68-09-1447-f01: Expression of IgD and CD38 distributes mature B (Bm) cells into sequential subsets from Bm1 through Bm5.11 These dot plots are representative examples of fluorescence-activated cell-sorter analysis of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and of normal controls.

Mentions: Distribution of blood B-cell subsets was determined in four groups of subjects (table 2); fig 1 shows representative examples. As described,121315 percentages of circulating Bm2+Bm2′ cells were higher in patients with pSS than in normal controls (mean (SD) 77.7 (13.3)% vs 47.3 (4.5)%: p<0.001). Interestingly, they were also higher than for patients with RA (48.8 (17.5)%: p<0.001) and patients with SLE (56.5 (18.5)%: p<0.001). Therefore, the percentages of memory eBm5+Bm5 were decreased in patients with pSS, relative to normal controls (10.9 (7.2)% vs 28.5 (9.1)%: p<0.001), and to patients with RA and SLE (10.9 (7.2)% vs 27.9 (12.0)% and 24.2 (12.7)%, respectively: p<0.001 for both comparisons).


Is the blood B-cell subset profile diagnostic for Sjogren syndrome?

Binard A, Le Pottier L, Devauchelle-Pensec V, Saraux A, Youinou P, Pers JO - Ann. Rheum. Dis. (2008)

Expression of IgD and CD38 distributes mature B (Bm) cells into sequential subsets from Bm1 through Bm5.11 These dot plots are representative examples of fluorescence-activated cell-sorter analysis of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and of normal controls.
© Copyright Policy - openaccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2719083&req=5

ARD-68-09-1447-f01: Expression of IgD and CD38 distributes mature B (Bm) cells into sequential subsets from Bm1 through Bm5.11 These dot plots are representative examples of fluorescence-activated cell-sorter analysis of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and of normal controls.
Mentions: Distribution of blood B-cell subsets was determined in four groups of subjects (table 2); fig 1 shows representative examples. As described,121315 percentages of circulating Bm2+Bm2′ cells were higher in patients with pSS than in normal controls (mean (SD) 77.7 (13.3)% vs 47.3 (4.5)%: p<0.001). Interestingly, they were also higher than for patients with RA (48.8 (17.5)%: p<0.001) and patients with SLE (56.5 (18.5)%: p<0.001). Therefore, the percentages of memory eBm5+Bm5 were decreased in patients with pSS, relative to normal controls (10.9 (7.2)% vs 28.5 (9.1)%: p<0.001), and to patients with RA and SLE (10.9 (7.2)% vs 27.9 (12.0)% and 24.2 (12.7)%, respectively: p<0.001 for both comparisons).

Bottom Line: The percentage of Bm2 and Bm2' cells was increased in the patients with pSS compared with 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (p<0.001 for the two comparisons).In contrast, those of early Bm5 (eBm5) and Bm5 were decreased in patients with pSS, compared with patients with RA and with SLE (p<0.001 for the two comparisons).Given its presentation as a signature for pSS, relative to RA and SLE, such a distribution of B-cell subsets might provide a useful diagnostic tool.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: EA Immunologie et Pathologie, Université Européenne de Bretagne, et Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, et Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Brest, Brest F29609, France.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the relevance of the blood B-cell subset profile for the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome.

Methods: The distribution of mature blood B cells from Bm1 through Bm5 was determined in 161 patients, of whom 25 fulfilled the American-European Consensus Group criteria for primary SS (pSS), and 136 served as disease controls.

Results: The percentage of Bm2 and Bm2' cells was increased in the patients with pSS compared with 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (p<0.001 for the two comparisons). In contrast, those of early Bm5 (eBm5) and Bm5 were decreased in patients with pSS, compared with patients with RA and with SLE (p<0.001 for the two comparisons). The receiver operating characteristic curves allowed for an optimising cut-off value of Bm2+Bm2' cells at 71.1% for 88.0% sensitivity and 83.1% specificity, that of eBm5+Bm5 cells at < or =13.5% for 84.0% sensitivity and 83.1% specificity, and, consequently, that of Bm2+Bm2'/eBm5+Bm5 at > or =5 for 88.0% sensitivity and 84.6% specificity.

Conclusion: Given its presentation as a signature for pSS, relative to RA and SLE, such a distribution of B-cell subsets might provide a useful diagnostic tool.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus