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Oncoproteomic profiling with antibody microarrays.

Alhamdani MS, Schröder C, Hoheisel JD - Genome Med (2009)

Bottom Line: The incidence of cancer and its associated mortality are increasing globally, indicating an urgent need to develop even more effective and sensitive sets of biomarkers that could help in early diagnosis and consequent intervention.Given that many cellular processes are carried out by proteins, cancer research has recently shifted toward an exploration of the full proteome for such discovery.Among the advanced methodologies that are being developed for analyzing the proteome, antibody microarrays have become a prominent tool for gathering the information required for a better understanding of disease biology, early detection, discrimination of tumors and monitoring of disease progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Functional Genome Analysis, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. m.alhamdani@dkfz-heidelberg.de.

ABSTRACT
The incidence of cancer and its associated mortality are increasing globally, indicating an urgent need to develop even more effective and sensitive sets of biomarkers that could help in early diagnosis and consequent intervention. Given that many cellular processes are carried out by proteins, cancer research has recently shifted toward an exploration of the full proteome for such discovery. Among the advanced methodologies that are being developed for analyzing the proteome, antibody microarrays have become a prominent tool for gathering the information required for a better understanding of disease biology, early detection, discrimination of tumors and monitoring of disease progression. Here, we review the technical aspects and challenges in the development and use of antibody microarray assays and examine recently reported applications in oncoproteomics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram of the basic processes of analyzing protein extracts on antibody microarrays. Although many details such as the binder type, the protein labeling, the surface structure of the solid support or the detection procedure may change considerably, the principal components and steps of the assay remain the same.
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Figure 1: Schematic diagram of the basic processes of analyzing protein extracts on antibody microarrays. Although many details such as the binder type, the protein labeling, the surface structure of the solid support or the detection procedure may change considerably, the principal components and steps of the assay remain the same.

Mentions: Antibody microarrays are miniaturized analytical systems generated by spatially arraying small amounts (volumes at a picoliter scale or less) of individual capture molecules, mostly antibodies, onto a solid support (Figure 1) [10-14]. So far, the number of antibodies has varied from a few to several hundred. Upon incubation with a protein sample, bound antigens are detected by fluorescence detection or surface plasmon resonance, for example. The acquired signal intensity images are converted to numerical values reflecting the protein profiles within the samples. Assay sensitivities in the picomole to femtomole range have been reported [15,16]. Although antibody microarrays were introduced after DNA microarrays, the feasibility of miniaturized and multiplexed immunoassays was first reported and discussed by Ekins in the late 1980s [17,18]. The technical factors that determine the set-up of a high-performing antibody microarray are the array surface, the antibodies, sample processing, incubation and signal generation and data analysis.


Oncoproteomic profiling with antibody microarrays.

Alhamdani MS, Schröder C, Hoheisel JD - Genome Med (2009)

Schematic diagram of the basic processes of analyzing protein extracts on antibody microarrays. Although many details such as the binder type, the protein labeling, the surface structure of the solid support or the detection procedure may change considerably, the principal components and steps of the assay remain the same.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2717394&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic diagram of the basic processes of analyzing protein extracts on antibody microarrays. Although many details such as the binder type, the protein labeling, the surface structure of the solid support or the detection procedure may change considerably, the principal components and steps of the assay remain the same.
Mentions: Antibody microarrays are miniaturized analytical systems generated by spatially arraying small amounts (volumes at a picoliter scale or less) of individual capture molecules, mostly antibodies, onto a solid support (Figure 1) [10-14]. So far, the number of antibodies has varied from a few to several hundred. Upon incubation with a protein sample, bound antigens are detected by fluorescence detection or surface plasmon resonance, for example. The acquired signal intensity images are converted to numerical values reflecting the protein profiles within the samples. Assay sensitivities in the picomole to femtomole range have been reported [15,16]. Although antibody microarrays were introduced after DNA microarrays, the feasibility of miniaturized and multiplexed immunoassays was first reported and discussed by Ekins in the late 1980s [17,18]. The technical factors that determine the set-up of a high-performing antibody microarray are the array surface, the antibodies, sample processing, incubation and signal generation and data analysis.

Bottom Line: The incidence of cancer and its associated mortality are increasing globally, indicating an urgent need to develop even more effective and sensitive sets of biomarkers that could help in early diagnosis and consequent intervention.Given that many cellular processes are carried out by proteins, cancer research has recently shifted toward an exploration of the full proteome for such discovery.Among the advanced methodologies that are being developed for analyzing the proteome, antibody microarrays have become a prominent tool for gathering the information required for a better understanding of disease biology, early detection, discrimination of tumors and monitoring of disease progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Functional Genome Analysis, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. m.alhamdani@dkfz-heidelberg.de.

ABSTRACT
The incidence of cancer and its associated mortality are increasing globally, indicating an urgent need to develop even more effective and sensitive sets of biomarkers that could help in early diagnosis and consequent intervention. Given that many cellular processes are carried out by proteins, cancer research has recently shifted toward an exploration of the full proteome for such discovery. Among the advanced methodologies that are being developed for analyzing the proteome, antibody microarrays have become a prominent tool for gathering the information required for a better understanding of disease biology, early detection, discrimination of tumors and monitoring of disease progression. Here, we review the technical aspects and challenges in the development and use of antibody microarray assays and examine recently reported applications in oncoproteomics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus