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Internationally trained pharmacists in Great Britain: what do registration data tell us about their recruitment?

Schafheutle EI, Hassell K - Hum Resour Health (2009)

Bottom Line: European pharmacists are younger (mean age 31.7) than reciprocal (40.0) or adjudication pharmacists (43.0), and the percentage of women among European-trained pharmacists is much higher (68%) when compared with British-trained pharmacists (56%).They represent a notable proportion of the Register, indicating that British employers are relying on their contribution for the delivery of pharmacy services.With the increasing mobility of health care professionals across geographical borders, it will be important to undertake primary research to gain a better understanding of the expectations, plans and experiences of pharmacists entering from outside Great Britain.

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Affiliation: Centre for Pharmacy Workforce Studies, Workforce Academy, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. ellen.schafheutle@manchester.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Internationally trained health professionals are an important part of the domestic workforce, but little is known about pharmacists who come to work in Great Britain. Recent changes in the registration routes onto the Register of Pharmacists of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain may have affected entries from overseas: reciprocal arrangements for pharmacists from Australia and New Zealand ended in June 2006; 10 new states joined the European Union in 2004 and a further two in 2007, allowing straightforward registration.

Aims: The aims of the paper are to extend our knowledge about the extent to which Great Britain is relying on the contribution of internationally trained pharmacists and to explore their routes of entry and demographic characteristics and compare them to those of pharmacists trained in Great Britain.

Methods: The August 2007 Register of Pharmacists provided the main data for analysis. Register extracts between 2002 and 2005 were also explored, allowing longitudinal comparison, and work pattern data from the 2005 Pharmacist Workforce Census were included.

Results: In 2007, internationally trained pharmacists represented 8.8% of the 43,262 registered pharmacists domiciled in Great Britain. The majority (40.6%) had joined the Register from Europe; 33.6% and 25.8% joined via adjudication and reciprocal arrangements. Until this entry route ended for pharmacists from Australia and New Zealand in 2006, annual numbers of reciprocal pharmacists increased. European pharmacists are younger (mean age 31.7) than reciprocal (40.0) or adjudication pharmacists (43.0), and the percentage of women among European-trained pharmacists is much higher (68%) when compared with British-trained pharmacists (56%). While only 7.1% of pharmacists registered in Great Britain have a London address, this proportion is much higher for European (13.9%), adjudication (19.5%) and reciprocal pharmacists (28.9%). The latter are more likely to work in hospitals than in community pharmacies, and all groups of internationally trained pharmacist are more likely to work full-time than British-trained ones. Adjudication pharmacists appear to stay on the Register longer than their reciprocal and European colleagues.

Conclusion: Analysis of the Register of Pharmacists provides novel insights into the origins, composition and destinations of internationally trained pharmacists. They represent a notable proportion of the Register, indicating that British employers are relying on their contribution for the delivery of pharmacy services. With the increasing mobility of health care professionals across geographical borders, it will be important to undertake primary research to gain a better understanding of the expectations, plans and experiences of pharmacists entering from outside Great Britain.

No MeSH data available.


Entry route for new pharmacist registrants between 2002 and 2007.
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Figure 2: Entry route for new pharmacist registrants between 2002 and 2007.

Mentions: When looking back over the five preceding years, 2007 was the first year since 2002 when the total number of internationally trained pharmacists with an address in Great Britain decreased (n = 3802 versus 3825 in 2006; 3482 in 2005; and 3292 in 2004 – see Figure 1). The percentage of those registered following adjudication has remained relatively constant over this period (between 2.7% and 3.3%), while the proportion of pharmacists entering via the European route has increased both in real and percentage terms. After annual increases in the number of those on the Register via reciprocal arrangements, particularly in 2006 before this entry route ended, their number decreased in 2007 (from 1245 [2.9%] in 2006 to 980 [2.3%] in 2007). These trends find further support when looking only at new registrations in the years from 2002 to 2007 (see Figure 2).


Internationally trained pharmacists in Great Britain: what do registration data tell us about their recruitment?

Schafheutle EI, Hassell K - Hum Resour Health (2009)

Entry route for new pharmacist registrants between 2002 and 2007.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2714492&req=5

Figure 2: Entry route for new pharmacist registrants between 2002 and 2007.
Mentions: When looking back over the five preceding years, 2007 was the first year since 2002 when the total number of internationally trained pharmacists with an address in Great Britain decreased (n = 3802 versus 3825 in 2006; 3482 in 2005; and 3292 in 2004 – see Figure 1). The percentage of those registered following adjudication has remained relatively constant over this period (between 2.7% and 3.3%), while the proportion of pharmacists entering via the European route has increased both in real and percentage terms. After annual increases in the number of those on the Register via reciprocal arrangements, particularly in 2006 before this entry route ended, their number decreased in 2007 (from 1245 [2.9%] in 2006 to 980 [2.3%] in 2007). These trends find further support when looking only at new registrations in the years from 2002 to 2007 (see Figure 2).

Bottom Line: European pharmacists are younger (mean age 31.7) than reciprocal (40.0) or adjudication pharmacists (43.0), and the percentage of women among European-trained pharmacists is much higher (68%) when compared with British-trained pharmacists (56%).They represent a notable proportion of the Register, indicating that British employers are relying on their contribution for the delivery of pharmacy services.With the increasing mobility of health care professionals across geographical borders, it will be important to undertake primary research to gain a better understanding of the expectations, plans and experiences of pharmacists entering from outside Great Britain.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Pharmacy Workforce Studies, Workforce Academy, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. ellen.schafheutle@manchester.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Internationally trained health professionals are an important part of the domestic workforce, but little is known about pharmacists who come to work in Great Britain. Recent changes in the registration routes onto the Register of Pharmacists of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain may have affected entries from overseas: reciprocal arrangements for pharmacists from Australia and New Zealand ended in June 2006; 10 new states joined the European Union in 2004 and a further two in 2007, allowing straightforward registration.

Aims: The aims of the paper are to extend our knowledge about the extent to which Great Britain is relying on the contribution of internationally trained pharmacists and to explore their routes of entry and demographic characteristics and compare them to those of pharmacists trained in Great Britain.

Methods: The August 2007 Register of Pharmacists provided the main data for analysis. Register extracts between 2002 and 2005 were also explored, allowing longitudinal comparison, and work pattern data from the 2005 Pharmacist Workforce Census were included.

Results: In 2007, internationally trained pharmacists represented 8.8% of the 43,262 registered pharmacists domiciled in Great Britain. The majority (40.6%) had joined the Register from Europe; 33.6% and 25.8% joined via adjudication and reciprocal arrangements. Until this entry route ended for pharmacists from Australia and New Zealand in 2006, annual numbers of reciprocal pharmacists increased. European pharmacists are younger (mean age 31.7) than reciprocal (40.0) or adjudication pharmacists (43.0), and the percentage of women among European-trained pharmacists is much higher (68%) when compared with British-trained pharmacists (56%). While only 7.1% of pharmacists registered in Great Britain have a London address, this proportion is much higher for European (13.9%), adjudication (19.5%) and reciprocal pharmacists (28.9%). The latter are more likely to work in hospitals than in community pharmacies, and all groups of internationally trained pharmacist are more likely to work full-time than British-trained ones. Adjudication pharmacists appear to stay on the Register longer than their reciprocal and European colleagues.

Conclusion: Analysis of the Register of Pharmacists provides novel insights into the origins, composition and destinations of internationally trained pharmacists. They represent a notable proportion of the Register, indicating that British employers are relying on their contribution for the delivery of pharmacy services. With the increasing mobility of health care professionals across geographical borders, it will be important to undertake primary research to gain a better understanding of the expectations, plans and experiences of pharmacists entering from outside Great Britain.

No MeSH data available.