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Epidemiological studies in incidence, prevalence, mortality, and comorbidity of the rheumatic diseases.

Gabriel SE, Michaud K - Arthritis Res. Ther. (2009)

Bottom Line: Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations.These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions--a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors.Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. gabriel.sherine@mayo.edu

ABSTRACT
Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Over the past decade there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the fundamental descriptive epidemiology (levels of disease frequency: incidence and prevalence, comorbidity, mortality, trends over time, geographic distributions, and clinical characteristics) of the rheumatic diseases. This progress is reviewed for the following major rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions--a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors. The past decade has also brought new insights regarding the comorbidity associated with rheumatic diseases. Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population. Taken together, these findings underscore the complexity of the rheumatic diseases and highlight the key role of epidemiological research in understanding these intriguing conditions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mortality in rheumatoid arthritis by sex. Observed mortality in (a) female and (b) male patients with rheumatoid arthritis and expected mortality (based on the Minnesota white population). Observed is solid line, expected is dashed line, and the gray region represents the 95% confidence limits for observed. Reproduced from [25] with permission.
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Figure 2: Mortality in rheumatoid arthritis by sex. Observed mortality in (a) female and (b) male patients with rheumatoid arthritis and expected mortality (based on the Minnesota white population). Observed is solid line, expected is dashed line, and the gray region represents the 95% confidence limits for observed. Reproduced from [25] with permission.

Mentions: Recent studies have demonstrated that RA patients have not experienced the same improvement in survival as the general population, and therefore the mortality gap between RA patients and individuals without RA has widened (Figure 2) [25]. The reasons for this widening mortality gap are unknown. Recent data (Figure 3) [27] suggest a trend toward an increase in RA-associated mortality rates in the older population groups.


Epidemiological studies in incidence, prevalence, mortality, and comorbidity of the rheumatic diseases.

Gabriel SE, Michaud K - Arthritis Res. Ther. (2009)

Mortality in rheumatoid arthritis by sex. Observed mortality in (a) female and (b) male patients with rheumatoid arthritis and expected mortality (based on the Minnesota white population). Observed is solid line, expected is dashed line, and the gray region represents the 95% confidence limits for observed. Reproduced from [25] with permission.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2714099&req=5

Figure 2: Mortality in rheumatoid arthritis by sex. Observed mortality in (a) female and (b) male patients with rheumatoid arthritis and expected mortality (based on the Minnesota white population). Observed is solid line, expected is dashed line, and the gray region represents the 95% confidence limits for observed. Reproduced from [25] with permission.
Mentions: Recent studies have demonstrated that RA patients have not experienced the same improvement in survival as the general population, and therefore the mortality gap between RA patients and individuals without RA has widened (Figure 2) [25]. The reasons for this widening mortality gap are unknown. Recent data (Figure 3) [27] suggest a trend toward an increase in RA-associated mortality rates in the older population groups.

Bottom Line: Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations.These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions--a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors.Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. gabriel.sherine@mayo.edu

ABSTRACT
Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Over the past decade there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the fundamental descriptive epidemiology (levels of disease frequency: incidence and prevalence, comorbidity, mortality, trends over time, geographic distributions, and clinical characteristics) of the rheumatic diseases. This progress is reviewed for the following major rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions--a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors. The past decade has also brought new insights regarding the comorbidity associated with rheumatic diseases. Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population. Taken together, these findings underscore the complexity of the rheumatic diseases and highlight the key role of epidemiological research in understanding these intriguing conditions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus