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Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived tissue oxygen saturation in battlefield injuries: a case series report.

Beilman GJ, Blondet JJ - World J Emerg Surg (2009)

Bottom Line: During the above time period, 161 patients were evaluated at the CSH as a result of traumatic injury and the device was placed on approximately 40 patients.In most patients, StO2 readings of greater than 70% were noted during the initial evaluation.In 8 patients, convenience samples of StO2 data were collected along with pertinent physiologic data.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgical Critical Care/Trauma, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, MMC 11, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. blond006@umn.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Near-infrared spectroscopy technology has been utilized to monitor perfusion status in animal models of hemorrhagic shock and in human traumatic injury. To observe the effectiveness of such a device in a combat setting, an FDA-approved device was used in conjunction with standard resuscitation and therapy of wounded patients presenting to the 228th Combat Support Hospital (CSH), Company B, over a three-month period.

Materials and methods: These observations were performed on patients presenting to the 228th CSH, Co B, at Forward Operating Base Speicher, outside of Tikrit, Iraq, between the dates of June 15 and September 11, 2005. We utilized the Inspectra 325 tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) monitor (Hutchinson Technology, Inc; Hutchinson, MN, USA) with the probe placed on the thenar eminence or on another appropriate muscle bed, and used to monitor StO2 during early resuscitation and stabilization of patients.

Results: During the above time period, 161 patients were evaluated at the CSH as a result of traumatic injury and the device was placed on approximately 40 patients. In most patients, StO2 readings of greater than 70% were noted during the initial evaluation. No further information was collected from these patients. In 8 patients, convenience samples of StO2 data were collected along with pertinent physiologic data. In these patients, StO2 levels of below 70% tracked with hypotension, tachycardia, and clinical shock resulted in increases in StO2 after resuscitation maneuvers.

Conclusion: Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived StO2 reflected and tracked the resuscitation status of our patients with battlefield injuries. StO2 has significant potential for use in resuscitation and care of patients with battlefield injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The non-invasive StO2 probe is placed directly over the thenar eminence of the patient. The device will continuously generate StO2 readings every 4 seconds.
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Figure 2: The non-invasive StO2 probe is placed directly over the thenar eminence of the patient. The device will continuously generate StO2 readings every 4 seconds.

Mentions: These observations were performed on patients presenting to the 228th Combat Support Hospital (CSH), Company B, at Forward Operating Base Speicher, outside of Tikrit, Iraq, between the dates of June 15 and September 11, 2005. These observations were performed during use of the Inspectra™ 325 as a clinical monitor (Figure 2). The Brooke Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board waived the need for informed consent. The Inspectra™ StO2 tissue oxygenation monitor (Hutchinson Technology, Inc; Hutchinson, MN, USA) is currently FDA-approved for use in monitoring patients continuously during circulatory or perfusion examinations of skeletal muscle, or when there is a suspicion of compromised circulation. A recent large observational and descriptive study found a mean thenar StO2 of 87 ± 6% in 707 normal human volunteers [9]. In the present observations, a 70% cutoff value of StO2 was selected to screen for patients to be followed in time because data obtained from severely injured trauma patients has verified that a StO2 value of less than 75% is predictive of multiple organ failure and mortality [10].


Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived tissue oxygen saturation in battlefield injuries: a case series report.

Beilman GJ, Blondet JJ - World J Emerg Surg (2009)

The non-invasive StO2 probe is placed directly over the thenar eminence of the patient. The device will continuously generate StO2 readings every 4 seconds.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2714076&req=5

Figure 2: The non-invasive StO2 probe is placed directly over the thenar eminence of the patient. The device will continuously generate StO2 readings every 4 seconds.
Mentions: These observations were performed on patients presenting to the 228th Combat Support Hospital (CSH), Company B, at Forward Operating Base Speicher, outside of Tikrit, Iraq, between the dates of June 15 and September 11, 2005. These observations were performed during use of the Inspectra™ 325 as a clinical monitor (Figure 2). The Brooke Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board waived the need for informed consent. The Inspectra™ StO2 tissue oxygenation monitor (Hutchinson Technology, Inc; Hutchinson, MN, USA) is currently FDA-approved for use in monitoring patients continuously during circulatory or perfusion examinations of skeletal muscle, or when there is a suspicion of compromised circulation. A recent large observational and descriptive study found a mean thenar StO2 of 87 ± 6% in 707 normal human volunteers [9]. In the present observations, a 70% cutoff value of StO2 was selected to screen for patients to be followed in time because data obtained from severely injured trauma patients has verified that a StO2 value of less than 75% is predictive of multiple organ failure and mortality [10].

Bottom Line: During the above time period, 161 patients were evaluated at the CSH as a result of traumatic injury and the device was placed on approximately 40 patients.In most patients, StO2 readings of greater than 70% were noted during the initial evaluation.In 8 patients, convenience samples of StO2 data were collected along with pertinent physiologic data.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgical Critical Care/Trauma, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, MMC 11, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. blond006@umn.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Near-infrared spectroscopy technology has been utilized to monitor perfusion status in animal models of hemorrhagic shock and in human traumatic injury. To observe the effectiveness of such a device in a combat setting, an FDA-approved device was used in conjunction with standard resuscitation and therapy of wounded patients presenting to the 228th Combat Support Hospital (CSH), Company B, over a three-month period.

Materials and methods: These observations were performed on patients presenting to the 228th CSH, Co B, at Forward Operating Base Speicher, outside of Tikrit, Iraq, between the dates of June 15 and September 11, 2005. We utilized the Inspectra 325 tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) monitor (Hutchinson Technology, Inc; Hutchinson, MN, USA) with the probe placed on the thenar eminence or on another appropriate muscle bed, and used to monitor StO2 during early resuscitation and stabilization of patients.

Results: During the above time period, 161 patients were evaluated at the CSH as a result of traumatic injury and the device was placed on approximately 40 patients. In most patients, StO2 readings of greater than 70% were noted during the initial evaluation. No further information was collected from these patients. In 8 patients, convenience samples of StO2 data were collected along with pertinent physiologic data. In these patients, StO2 levels of below 70% tracked with hypotension, tachycardia, and clinical shock resulted in increases in StO2 after resuscitation maneuvers.

Conclusion: Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived StO2 reflected and tracked the resuscitation status of our patients with battlefield injuries. StO2 has significant potential for use in resuscitation and care of patients with battlefield injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus