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Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms.

Lee SH, Cho JY, Song MJ, Min JY, Han BH, Lee YH, Cho BJ, Kim SH - Korean J Radiol (2002 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination.During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs.We describe their typical ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 100-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
A variety of neoplasms can develop in each fetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplasms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings.

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Prenatal ultrasonographic findings of fetal brain teratoma in a 35-week fetus.A, B. Axial and coronal ultrasonographic images of the fetal head show that a large mass of mixed echogenicity (arrows) has replacednormal brain structures.
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Figure 1: Prenatal ultrasonographic findings of fetal brain teratoma in a 35-week fetus.A, B. Axial and coronal ultrasonographic images of the fetal head show that a large mass of mixed echogenicity (arrows) has replacednormal brain structures.

Mentions: Teratoma is the most common congenital neoplasm composed of tissues originating from all three germinal layers, and may occur in a variety of locations. Fetal brain teratoma usually appears as a large, solid and/or cystic tumor, often replacing normal brain tissue and sometimes eroding the skull (Fig. 1) (1). Associated congenital defects are frequently encountered, and if a fetal teratoma is suspected, a careful US survey should thus be performed (2). Brain teratomas usually cause intrauterine or early neonatal death, and require cesarean section for delivery of an enlarged fetal head (1).


Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms.

Lee SH, Cho JY, Song MJ, Min JY, Han BH, Lee YH, Cho BJ, Kim SH - Korean J Radiol (2002 Jan-Mar)

Prenatal ultrasonographic findings of fetal brain teratoma in a 35-week fetus.A, B. Axial and coronal ultrasonographic images of the fetal head show that a large mass of mixed echogenicity (arrows) has replacednormal brain structures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713989&req=5

Figure 1: Prenatal ultrasonographic findings of fetal brain teratoma in a 35-week fetus.A, B. Axial and coronal ultrasonographic images of the fetal head show that a large mass of mixed echogenicity (arrows) has replacednormal brain structures.
Mentions: Teratoma is the most common congenital neoplasm composed of tissues originating from all three germinal layers, and may occur in a variety of locations. Fetal brain teratoma usually appears as a large, solid and/or cystic tumor, often replacing normal brain tissue and sometimes eroding the skull (Fig. 1) (1). Associated congenital defects are frequently encountered, and if a fetal teratoma is suspected, a careful US survey should thus be performed (2). Brain teratomas usually cause intrauterine or early neonatal death, and require cesarean section for delivery of an enlarged fetal head (1).

Bottom Line: Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination.During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs.We describe their typical ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 100-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
A variety of neoplasms can develop in each fetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplasms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus