Limits...
The role of sonography in patients with breast cancer presenting as an axillary mass.

Park SY, Kim EK, Oh KK, Lee KS, Park BW - Korean J Radiol (2002 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: In three of these four detected cases, fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast parenchyma was present; in one, the parenchyma was dense.Final pathologic examination indicated that all breast lesions except one, which was a ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion, were infiltrating ductal carcinomas whose size ranged from microscopic to greater than 3 cm.At the time of this study, all seven patients were alive and well, having been disease free for up to 61 months after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ekkim@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare sonography and mammography in terms of their diagnostic value in breast cancer cases which initially presented as an axillary mass without a palpable mass or other clinical symptoms.

Materials and methods: Seven patients with enlarged axillary lymph nodes who first presented with no evidence of palpable breast lesions and who underwent both mammography and sonography were enrolled in this study. In six of the seven, the presence of metastatic adenocarcinoma was confirmed preoperatively by axillary needle aspiration biopsy; in four, subsequent sonographically-guided breast core biopsy performed after careful examination of the primary site indicated that primary breast cancer was present. In each case, the radiologic findings were evaluated by both breast sonography and mammography.

Results: Breast lesions were detected mammographically in four of seven cases (57%); in three of the four, the lesion presented as a mass, and in one as microcalcification. In three of these four detected cases, fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast parenchyma was present; in one, the parenchyma was dense. In the three cases in which lesions were not detected, mammography revealed the presence of heterogeneously dense parenchyma. Breast sonography showed that lesions were present in six of seven cases (86%); in the remaining patient, malignant microcalcification was detected at mammography. Final pathologic examination indicated that all breast lesions except one, which was a ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion, were infiltrating ductal carcinomas whose size ranged from microscopic to greater than 3 cm. At the time of this study, all seven patients were alive and well, having been disease free for up to 61 months after surgery.

Conclusion: In women with a palpable axillary mass confirmed as metastatic adenocarcinoma, breast sonography may be a valuable adjunct to mammography.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A 48-year-old-woman with axillary node metastasis.A. Mammography reveals the presence of clustered microcalcifications (arrows), without mass, in the right inner central area. At sonography, however, neither a breast nodule nor the above-mentioned microcalcifications are seen. Surgical excision after needle localization confirmed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion.B. Axillary view depicts multiple hyperdense enlarged lymph nodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713883&req=5

Figure 2: A 48-year-old-woman with axillary node metastasis.A. Mammography reveals the presence of clustered microcalcifications (arrows), without mass, in the right inner central area. At sonography, however, neither a breast nodule nor the above-mentioned microcalcifications are seen. Surgical excision after needle localization confirmed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion.B. Axillary view depicts multiple hyperdense enlarged lymph nodes.

Mentions: The mammographic and sonographic findings are summarized in Table 1. The mammograms optained were suspicious in four cases (57%) [BIRADS category 4 (n=2) and 5 (n=2)] and negative in three. The suspicious mammograms demonstrated a mass in three patients (Fig. 1A) and microcalcification in one (Fig. 2A); fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast parenchyma was present in three, and dense parenchyma in one. In the three non-suspicious cases, mammography demonstrated heterogenously dense breast parenchyma (Fig. 3A).


The role of sonography in patients with breast cancer presenting as an axillary mass.

Park SY, Kim EK, Oh KK, Lee KS, Park BW - Korean J Radiol (2002 Jul-Sep)

A 48-year-old-woman with axillary node metastasis.A. Mammography reveals the presence of clustered microcalcifications (arrows), without mass, in the right inner central area. At sonography, however, neither a breast nodule nor the above-mentioned microcalcifications are seen. Surgical excision after needle localization confirmed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion.B. Axillary view depicts multiple hyperdense enlarged lymph nodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713883&req=5

Figure 2: A 48-year-old-woman with axillary node metastasis.A. Mammography reveals the presence of clustered microcalcifications (arrows), without mass, in the right inner central area. At sonography, however, neither a breast nodule nor the above-mentioned microcalcifications are seen. Surgical excision after needle localization confirmed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion.B. Axillary view depicts multiple hyperdense enlarged lymph nodes.
Mentions: The mammographic and sonographic findings are summarized in Table 1. The mammograms optained were suspicious in four cases (57%) [BIRADS category 4 (n=2) and 5 (n=2)] and negative in three. The suspicious mammograms demonstrated a mass in three patients (Fig. 1A) and microcalcification in one (Fig. 2A); fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast parenchyma was present in three, and dense parenchyma in one. In the three non-suspicious cases, mammography demonstrated heterogenously dense breast parenchyma (Fig. 3A).

Bottom Line: In three of these four detected cases, fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast parenchyma was present; in one, the parenchyma was dense.Final pathologic examination indicated that all breast lesions except one, which was a ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion, were infiltrating ductal carcinomas whose size ranged from microscopic to greater than 3 cm.At the time of this study, all seven patients were alive and well, having been disease free for up to 61 months after surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ekkim@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare sonography and mammography in terms of their diagnostic value in breast cancer cases which initially presented as an axillary mass without a palpable mass or other clinical symptoms.

Materials and methods: Seven patients with enlarged axillary lymph nodes who first presented with no evidence of palpable breast lesions and who underwent both mammography and sonography were enrolled in this study. In six of the seven, the presence of metastatic adenocarcinoma was confirmed preoperatively by axillary needle aspiration biopsy; in four, subsequent sonographically-guided breast core biopsy performed after careful examination of the primary site indicated that primary breast cancer was present. In each case, the radiologic findings were evaluated by both breast sonography and mammography.

Results: Breast lesions were detected mammographically in four of seven cases (57%); in three of the four, the lesion presented as a mass, and in one as microcalcification. In three of these four detected cases, fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast parenchyma was present; in one, the parenchyma was dense. In the three cases in which lesions were not detected, mammography revealed the presence of heterogeneously dense parenchyma. Breast sonography showed that lesions were present in six of seven cases (86%); in the remaining patient, malignant microcalcification was detected at mammography. Final pathologic examination indicated that all breast lesions except one, which was a ductal carcinoma in situ, with microinvasion, were infiltrating ductal carcinomas whose size ranged from microscopic to greater than 3 cm. At the time of this study, all seven patients were alive and well, having been disease free for up to 61 months after surgery.

Conclusion: In women with a palpable axillary mass confirmed as metastatic adenocarcinoma, breast sonography may be a valuable adjunct to mammography.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus