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Translocation detection in lymphoma diagnosis by split-signal FISH: a standardised approach.

van Rijk A, Mason D, Jones M, Cabeçadas J, Crespo M, Cigudosa JC, Garcia JF, Leoncini L, Cocco M, Hansmann ML, Mottok A, Copie Bergman C, Baia M, Anagnostou D, Pouliou E, Hamilton Dutoit S, Hjøllund Christiansen M, Svenstrup Poulsen T, Hauge Matthiesen S, van Dongen J, van Krieken JH - J Hematop (2008)

Bottom Line: The histopathological diagnosis is generally considered difficult and prone to mistakes.Hence, a split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) procedure would be helpful in discriminating the most difficult classifications.The Euro-FISH programme, a concerted action of nine European laboratories, has validated a robust, standardised protocol to improve the diagnostic approach on lymphoma entities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology-824, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, a.vanrijk@pathol.umcn.nl.

ABSTRACT
Lymphomas originating from the lymphatic system comprise about 30 entities classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The histopathological diagnosis is generally considered difficult and prone to mistakes. Since non-random chromosomal translocations are specifically involved in different lymphoma entities, their detection will be increasingly important. Hence, a split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) procedure would be helpful in discriminating the most difficult classifications. The Euro-FISH programme, a concerted action of nine European laboratories, has validated a robust, standardised protocol to improve the diagnostic approach on lymphoma entities. Therefore, 16 fluorescent probes and 10 WHO entities, supplemented with reactive cases, were selected. The results of the Euro-FISH programme show that all probes were correctly cytogenetically located, that the standardised protocol is robust, resulting in reliable results in approximately 90% of cases, and that the procedure could be implemented in every laboratory, bringing the relatively easy interpretation of split-signal probes within the reach of many pathology laboratories.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of nucleus stained with a fusion probe (a) and a split-signal probe (b) to detect a chromosomal translocation in a tumour cell. aRed and green need to co-localise to detect a known translocation (right-hand side) whereas a split-signal probe (b) detects a break without the need to know the translocation partner (right-hand side)
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Fig1: Schematic representation of nucleus stained with a fusion probe (a) and a split-signal probe (b) to detect a chromosomal translocation in a tumour cell. aRed and green need to co-localise to detect a known translocation (right-hand side) whereas a split-signal probe (b) detects a break without the need to know the translocation partner (right-hand side)

Mentions: To detect a translocation in a tumour cell, one can use probes with different colours on different chromosomes (usually two) in such a way that, in the case of a translocation, a fusion signal occurs (Fig. 1a). This procedure is feasible in cytospins or preparations of isolated nuclei, but more difficult in tissue sections where many nuclei are cut and thus a complete signal is present in a minority of cells, making interpretation cumbersome. Split-signal or break-apart probes use differently coloured probes on both sides of a known breakpoint region, resulting in a fused signal in the normal situation, but single colours when a break in the gene occurs (Fig. 1b). This approach is advantageous in tissue sections since each single coloured signal indicates a specific chromosomal break.Fig. 1


Translocation detection in lymphoma diagnosis by split-signal FISH: a standardised approach.

van Rijk A, Mason D, Jones M, Cabeçadas J, Crespo M, Cigudosa JC, Garcia JF, Leoncini L, Cocco M, Hansmann ML, Mottok A, Copie Bergman C, Baia M, Anagnostou D, Pouliou E, Hamilton Dutoit S, Hjøllund Christiansen M, Svenstrup Poulsen T, Hauge Matthiesen S, van Dongen J, van Krieken JH - J Hematop (2008)

Schematic representation of nucleus stained with a fusion probe (a) and a split-signal probe (b) to detect a chromosomal translocation in a tumour cell. aRed and green need to co-localise to detect a known translocation (right-hand side) whereas a split-signal probe (b) detects a break without the need to know the translocation partner (right-hand side)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713488&req=5

Fig1: Schematic representation of nucleus stained with a fusion probe (a) and a split-signal probe (b) to detect a chromosomal translocation in a tumour cell. aRed and green need to co-localise to detect a known translocation (right-hand side) whereas a split-signal probe (b) detects a break without the need to know the translocation partner (right-hand side)
Mentions: To detect a translocation in a tumour cell, one can use probes with different colours on different chromosomes (usually two) in such a way that, in the case of a translocation, a fusion signal occurs (Fig. 1a). This procedure is feasible in cytospins or preparations of isolated nuclei, but more difficult in tissue sections where many nuclei are cut and thus a complete signal is present in a minority of cells, making interpretation cumbersome. Split-signal or break-apart probes use differently coloured probes on both sides of a known breakpoint region, resulting in a fused signal in the normal situation, but single colours when a break in the gene occurs (Fig. 1b). This approach is advantageous in tissue sections since each single coloured signal indicates a specific chromosomal break.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The histopathological diagnosis is generally considered difficult and prone to mistakes.Hence, a split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) procedure would be helpful in discriminating the most difficult classifications.The Euro-FISH programme, a concerted action of nine European laboratories, has validated a robust, standardised protocol to improve the diagnostic approach on lymphoma entities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology-824, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, a.vanrijk@pathol.umcn.nl.

ABSTRACT
Lymphomas originating from the lymphatic system comprise about 30 entities classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The histopathological diagnosis is generally considered difficult and prone to mistakes. Since non-random chromosomal translocations are specifically involved in different lymphoma entities, their detection will be increasingly important. Hence, a split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) procedure would be helpful in discriminating the most difficult classifications. The Euro-FISH programme, a concerted action of nine European laboratories, has validated a robust, standardised protocol to improve the diagnostic approach on lymphoma entities. Therefore, 16 fluorescent probes and 10 WHO entities, supplemented with reactive cases, were selected. The results of the Euro-FISH programme show that all probes were correctly cytogenetically located, that the standardised protocol is robust, resulting in reliable results in approximately 90% of cases, and that the procedure could be implemented in every laboratory, bringing the relatively easy interpretation of split-signal probes within the reach of many pathology laboratories.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus