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Application of chicken microarrays for gene expression analysis in other avian species.

Crowley TM, Haring VR, Burggraaf S, Moore RJ - BMC Genomics (2009)

Bottom Line: We successfully hybridised a number of different avian species to this array, obtaining reliable signals.Cross species hybridisation using long oligonucleotide microarrays is a powerful tool to study the immune response in avian species with little available genomic information.The present study validated the use of the whole genome long oligonucleotide chicken microarray to investigate gene expression in a range of avian species.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Animal Health Laboratory, CSIRO, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. Tamsyn.Crowley@csiro.au

ABSTRACT

Background: With the threat of emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, whose natural hosts are thought to be a variety of wild water birds including duck, we are armed with very few genomic resources to investigate large scale immunological gene expression studies in avian species. Multiple options exist for conducting large gene expression studies in chickens and in this study we explore the feasibility of using one of these tools to investigate gene expression in other avian species.

Results: In this study we utilised a whole genome long oligonucleotide chicken microarray to assess the utility of cross species hybridisation (CSH). We successfully hybridised a number of different avian species to this array, obtaining reliable signals. We were able to distinguish ducks that were infected with avian influenza from uninfected ducks using this microarray platform. In addition, we were able to detect known chicken immunological genes in all of the hybridised avian species.

Conclusion: Cross species hybridisation using long oligonucleotide microarrays is a powerful tool to study the immune response in avian species with little available genomic information. The present study validated the use of the whole genome long oligonucleotide chicken microarray to investigate gene expression in a range of avian species.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic orders of birds. Phylogenetic tree of all orders of birds displaying the relative evolutionary distance [20]. Red text indicates orders of birds that are represented in this study.
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Figure 1: Phylogenetic orders of birds. Phylogenetic tree of all orders of birds displaying the relative evolutionary distance [20]. Red text indicates orders of birds that are represented in this study.

Mentions: Spleen samples were collected from a wide range of avian species (Figure 1) (Chicken, Gallus gallus; Duck, Anas platyrhynchos; Starling, Sturnus vulgaris; Magpie goose, Anseranas semipalmata; Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae and Tawny frogmouth, Podargus strigoides) and placed into 10 volumes of RNAlater (Ambion, USA) and stored at -20°C until RNA isolation. All control birds were at adult stage and free from clinical disease. Five-week-old Pekin ducks were challenged with a Vietnamese H5N1 strain (A/Muscovy duck/Vietnam/453/2004); each dose contained approximately 107.2 median egg infectious doses (EID50). Spleen samples were collected 2 days post infection. Infected samples were confirmed using viral titres (data not shown).


Application of chicken microarrays for gene expression analysis in other avian species.

Crowley TM, Haring VR, Burggraaf S, Moore RJ - BMC Genomics (2009)

Phylogenetic orders of birds. Phylogenetic tree of all orders of birds displaying the relative evolutionary distance [20]. Red text indicates orders of birds that are represented in this study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713436&req=5

Figure 1: Phylogenetic orders of birds. Phylogenetic tree of all orders of birds displaying the relative evolutionary distance [20]. Red text indicates orders of birds that are represented in this study.
Mentions: Spleen samples were collected from a wide range of avian species (Figure 1) (Chicken, Gallus gallus; Duck, Anas platyrhynchos; Starling, Sturnus vulgaris; Magpie goose, Anseranas semipalmata; Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae and Tawny frogmouth, Podargus strigoides) and placed into 10 volumes of RNAlater (Ambion, USA) and stored at -20°C until RNA isolation. All control birds were at adult stage and free from clinical disease. Five-week-old Pekin ducks were challenged with a Vietnamese H5N1 strain (A/Muscovy duck/Vietnam/453/2004); each dose contained approximately 107.2 median egg infectious doses (EID50). Spleen samples were collected 2 days post infection. Infected samples were confirmed using viral titres (data not shown).

Bottom Line: We successfully hybridised a number of different avian species to this array, obtaining reliable signals.Cross species hybridisation using long oligonucleotide microarrays is a powerful tool to study the immune response in avian species with little available genomic information.The present study validated the use of the whole genome long oligonucleotide chicken microarray to investigate gene expression in a range of avian species.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Animal Health Laboratory, CSIRO, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. Tamsyn.Crowley@csiro.au

ABSTRACT

Background: With the threat of emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, whose natural hosts are thought to be a variety of wild water birds including duck, we are armed with very few genomic resources to investigate large scale immunological gene expression studies in avian species. Multiple options exist for conducting large gene expression studies in chickens and in this study we explore the feasibility of using one of these tools to investigate gene expression in other avian species.

Results: In this study we utilised a whole genome long oligonucleotide chicken microarray to assess the utility of cross species hybridisation (CSH). We successfully hybridised a number of different avian species to this array, obtaining reliable signals. We were able to distinguish ducks that were infected with avian influenza from uninfected ducks using this microarray platform. In addition, we were able to detect known chicken immunological genes in all of the hybridised avian species.

Conclusion: Cross species hybridisation using long oligonucleotide microarrays is a powerful tool to study the immune response in avian species with little available genomic information. The present study validated the use of the whole genome long oligonucleotide chicken microarray to investigate gene expression in a range of avian species.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus