Limits...
Transcriptome analysis of the venom gland of the scorpion Scorpiops jendeki: implication for the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal.

Ma Y, Zhao R, He Y, Li S, Liu J, Wu Y, Cao Z, Li W - BMC Genomics (2009)

Bottom Line: This work provides the first set of cDNAs from Scorpiops jendeki, and one of the few transcriptomic analyses from a scorpion.This allows the characterization of a large number of venom molecules, belonging to either known or atypical types of scorpion venom peptides and proteins.Besides, our work could provide some clues to the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by comparison with venom data from other scorpion lineages.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, PR China. mayibao@163.com

ABSTRACT

Background: The family Euscorpiidae, which covers Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, is one of the most widely distributed scorpion groups. However, no studies have been conducted on the venom of a Euscorpiidae species yet. In this work, we performed a transcriptomic approach for characterizing the venom components from a Euscorpiidae scorpion, Scorpiops jendeki.

Results: There are ten known types of venom peptides and proteins obtained from Scorpiops jendeki. Great diversity is observed in primary sequences of most highly expressed types. The most highly expressed types are cytolytic peptides and serine proteases. Neurotoxins specific for sodium channels, which are major groups of venom components from Buthidae scorpions, are not detected in this study. In addition to those known types of venom peptides and proteins, we also obtain nine atypical types of venom molecules which haven't been observed in any other scorpion species studied to date.

Conclusion: This work provides the first set of cDNAs from Scorpiops jendeki, and one of the few transcriptomic analyses from a scorpion. This allows the characterization of a large number of venom molecules, belonging to either known or atypical types of scorpion venom peptides and proteins. Besides, our work could provide some clues to the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by comparison with venom data from other scorpion lineages.

Show MeSH
Sequence alignment of jendins. SJEs are clusters from this work. The boxed "GKR" part of the translated sequences represents typical processing signal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713264&req=5

Figure 12: Sequence alignment of jendins. SJEs are clusters from this work. The boxed "GKR" part of the translated sequences represents typical processing signal.

Mentions: A highly expressed type of venom peptides was identified to be encoded by clusters SJE002C and SJE021C containing 37 and 22 ESTs each (Figure 12). Here we named them jendins. They have no hit found against any public database, indicating that jendins are an atypical peptide types from scorpion venoms. Jendin precursors consist of a signal sequence of 23 residues and a premature peptide of 37 residues. The premature peptide has a typical processing signal (Gly-Lys-Arg) at positions 14–16[36]. It remains to be explored whether jendins have a similar post-translational processing as cytolytic peptides[34,58]. Furthermore, their biological function remains to be investigated.


Transcriptome analysis of the venom gland of the scorpion Scorpiops jendeki: implication for the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal.

Ma Y, Zhao R, He Y, Li S, Liu J, Wu Y, Cao Z, Li W - BMC Genomics (2009)

Sequence alignment of jendins. SJEs are clusters from this work. The boxed "GKR" part of the translated sequences represents typical processing signal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713264&req=5

Figure 12: Sequence alignment of jendins. SJEs are clusters from this work. The boxed "GKR" part of the translated sequences represents typical processing signal.
Mentions: A highly expressed type of venom peptides was identified to be encoded by clusters SJE002C and SJE021C containing 37 and 22 ESTs each (Figure 12). Here we named them jendins. They have no hit found against any public database, indicating that jendins are an atypical peptide types from scorpion venoms. Jendin precursors consist of a signal sequence of 23 residues and a premature peptide of 37 residues. The premature peptide has a typical processing signal (Gly-Lys-Arg) at positions 14–16[36]. It remains to be explored whether jendins have a similar post-translational processing as cytolytic peptides[34,58]. Furthermore, their biological function remains to be investigated.

Bottom Line: This work provides the first set of cDNAs from Scorpiops jendeki, and one of the few transcriptomic analyses from a scorpion.This allows the characterization of a large number of venom molecules, belonging to either known or atypical types of scorpion venom peptides and proteins.Besides, our work could provide some clues to the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by comparison with venom data from other scorpion lineages.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, PR China. mayibao@163.com

ABSTRACT

Background: The family Euscorpiidae, which covers Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, is one of the most widely distributed scorpion groups. However, no studies have been conducted on the venom of a Euscorpiidae species yet. In this work, we performed a transcriptomic approach for characterizing the venom components from a Euscorpiidae scorpion, Scorpiops jendeki.

Results: There are ten known types of venom peptides and proteins obtained from Scorpiops jendeki. Great diversity is observed in primary sequences of most highly expressed types. The most highly expressed types are cytolytic peptides and serine proteases. Neurotoxins specific for sodium channels, which are major groups of venom components from Buthidae scorpions, are not detected in this study. In addition to those known types of venom peptides and proteins, we also obtain nine atypical types of venom molecules which haven't been observed in any other scorpion species studied to date.

Conclusion: This work provides the first set of cDNAs from Scorpiops jendeki, and one of the few transcriptomic analyses from a scorpion. This allows the characterization of a large number of venom molecules, belonging to either known or atypical types of scorpion venom peptides and proteins. Besides, our work could provide some clues to the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by comparison with venom data from other scorpion lineages.

Show MeSH